Autoimmune Disorder Relief Using Yoga

Befriending the Body: Find Peace and Relief From Autoimmune Disorders Through Yoga

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. In 1996, Hillary Rubin was realizing her goal of working in New York’s fashion business when she was forced to visit the doctor because of persistent numbness in her legs. Multiple sclerosis was diagnosed after a battery of tests revealed that the patient had the autoimmune illness, which can cause damage to the central nervous system. MS, which is the biggest cause of disability among young adults, can affect balance, movement, and even eyesight in certain cases.

Rubin’s yoga practice has helped her to transcend the physical and psychological problems of multiple sclerosis (MS), which currently has no treatment.

Rubin, 37, is now a full-time certified Anusara Yoga teacher based in Los Angeles, and he is symptom-free, having stopped taking medicine.

Her symptoms have been managed with an array of complementary therapies, including acupuncture and dietary modifications, but yoga has been her mainstay—the anchor that not only keeps her symptoms at bay, but also aids her in coming to terms with an unknown future.

The War Within

Rubin is one of 10 million Americans who suffer from an autoimmune disorder, which is a broad phrase that encompasses more than 80 disorders such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and Graves’ disease. The immune system becomes overactive and attacks the exact thing it was supposed to protect: the body, resulting in an autoimmune illness. According to Loren Fishman, MD, co-author of Yoga and Multiple Sclerosis and associate professor at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, “the immune system misidentifies normal cells as invaders, but they are not.” Yoga and Multiple Sclerosis is a book about the relationship between yoga and MS.

  1. “These normal cells may also be found in your nerves, as in multiple sclerosis.” Before roughly 50 years ago, the concept of the body attacking itself was thought absurd.
  2. The immune system’s capacity to discern between what is self and what is not self, we now know, is far from flawless, as we have discovered.
  3. No portion of the body is out of reach for them, from the skin to the joints to the blood vessels and everything in between.
  4. However, autoimmune illnesses frequently travel in groups of two or three, affecting many organs and systems at the same time, necessitating the need for patients to consult multiple experts for therapy.
  5. As a result, a trend among autoimmune specialists is underway to shift the attention away from each disorder’s quirks and toward their shared characteristics, according to Rose.
  6. One of the common characteristics of autoimmune illnesses is that they tend to affect women more frequently than males.
  7. Although it is unclear why women are more susceptible than males, some researchers believe that the complexity of women’s immune systems plays a part in this.
  8. As Fishman puts it, “Females are capable of a genetic accomplishment that no other creature on the planet comes near to,” he argues.
  9. Researchers have discovered a gene cluster that is associated with a tendency to autoimmunity.

Instead, a mix of hereditary and environmental variables are required to bring about the start of the disease.

Tending to Body and Mind

Autoimmunity is a complicated health condition that need a multidisciplinary approach coordinated by health-care specialists to effectively treat. Yoga, although it is not a panacea, can help to alleviate some of the common problems, both physical and mental, that people face. A sense of peace and well-being that comes from moderate exercise such as yoga, according to Fishman, decreases the body’s creation of physical and mental stresses that might weaken the immune system. Practicing yoga on a physical level has been shown to activate the parasympathetic nervous system (which is known for its soothing effect), which in turn helps to lower the body’s stress reaction.

Moreover, recent research has revealed that moderate exercise might help to reduce inflammation in the body, which is associated with autoimmune illness.

However, controlling an autoimmune illness is not as easy as resting or engaging in regular physical activity on a regular basis.

In the words of Gary Kraftsow, founder and director of the American Viniyoga Institute, “One of the most essential gifts that yoga can provide you is an inner connection to the understanding that you are not your diagnosis.” “People who suffer from autoimmune illnesses must move their focus away from the body and onto something more fundamental, something that is unchangeable.

“One of the most important aspects of yoga and meditation practice is knowing how to pick the focus of one’s attention,” explains the author.

In 2000, she was unable to walk without assistance and was confined to her home for over four years as a result of persistent discomfort.

Despite getting back on her feet with the help of pain killers and anti-inflammatory medications, it wasn’t until she discovered yoga that she truly found peace with her body.

“However, it also taught me to realize that sometimes I can only do a little portion of what I’d like to achieve, and that ‘perfect’ is the best you can do on a given day.” The 33-year-old Porter now works as a certified yoga instructor in Singapore, where she instructs a combination of hatha, vinyasa, and Iyengar yoga classes.

“My discomfort develops sharply and startlingly rapidly if I don’t do any activity,” she adds. “What makes yoga perfect is the plethora of variations and adaptations of poses that make them accessible to people of all physical abilities,” says the author.

Living in the Moment

A complicated health condition, autoimmunity requires a multidisciplinary approach coordinated by health-care experts to be effectively treated. Yoga, while not a panacea, can help to alleviate some of the common physical and emotional issues that we all face. A sense of serenity and well-being that comes from moderate exercise such as yoga, according to Fishman, decreases the body’s production of physical and mental stresses that weaken the immune system. Studies have shown that yoga boosts the parasympathetic nervous system (which has a soothing effect), which in turn decreases the body’s response to stress.

Moreover, recent research has demonstrated that moderate exercise might help to reduce inflammation in the body, which is associated with autoimmune illness.

Nonetheless, controlling an autoimmune illness is not as easy as resting or engaging in regular physical activity on a consistent basis.

As Gary Kraftsow, the founder and director of the American Viniyoga Institute, explains, “One of the most essential gifts of yoga is an inner connection to the understanding that you are not your diagnosis.” “People who suffer from autoimmune illnesses must change their focus away from the body and onto something more profound, something that is unchanging.

  • “Learning how to pick the focus of your attention is a key element of yoga and meditation practice,” she explains.
  • In the instance of Kate Porter, this was the situation.
  • Lupus, an inflammatory condition characterized by an inflammation of the connective tissue, was eventually determined to be the cause of the symptoms and the eventual diagnosis.
  • According to her, “yoga assisted me in regaining and maintaining my health.” “However, it also taught me to realize that sometimes I can only do a little portion of what I’d like to achieve, and that ‘perfect’ is the absolute best you can do on a given day.
  • Despite the fact that she continues to have pain that changes in severity from week to week and that she continues to use pain relievers and anti-inflammatories, she believes that her yoga practice is the most effective treatment.

“My discomfort develops fiercely and disturbingly rapidly if I don’t do any activity,” she claims. Yoga is great because of the numerous variants and alterations of positions that make them accessible to people with all types of physical limitations, including mine.

A Journey Back to Health

This is the moving story of one woman’s journey to recovery. Hillary Rubin learned about yoga while visiting her chiropractor’s clinic. That’s when she first saw the book Light on Yoga, which is considered to be B. K. S. Iyengar’s authoritative work. As she opened the pages of the book, her gaze was pulled to the black-and-white photographs of a young Iyengar contorted into what appeared to be impossible postures. She was captivated to the practice for no apparent reason. She went out and found her first yoga class, piqued by her newfound curiosity.

  • A few months later, the complaint she’d brought to her chiropractor about pins and needles in her feet had progressed to her left hand, arm, and chest, and she’d sought medical attention.
  • She was just 24 years old when she fell into a dark hole of denial, sadness, and fury, and she never came out.
  • “I felt responsible for everything and everyone, even myself,” she adds.
  • Rubin experimented with a variety of instructors and teaching approaches before settling on one whose words dug into her mind like fishhooks.
  • I was encouraged to return to my mat time and time again after being assured that I mattered in the world, that my expression made a difference, and that I was more than my diagnosis.
  • When Rubin was first diagnosed with MS, she didn’t let the numbness and tingling in her hands and feet deter her from practicing yoga.
  • According to her, “Yoga helped me recognize that I was feeling victimized by my diagnosis.” Then I made the decision to turn the tables on myself and take responsibility for my own health.

Slowly and gradually, as she focused her attention within, her symptoms began to subside, and she was able to wean herself off medicine.

She attributes her life’s transformation to a paradigm shift away from fear and toward empowerment.

“I take care of my physique in the same way that I would take care of a classic automobile.” “My breath serves as fuel, and my practice serves as a tune-up,” says the author.

A hike or writing in her notebook are some of the activities she may do at that time.

“I think I might even get a little more sleep,” she admits.

Yoga is the cornerstone of her recovery, despite the fact that she incorporates many different techniques.

“It provides me with insights, helps me to be more creative, and sharpens my intuition.” As a result, I’ve come to know that being in my body is actually a blessing.” Catherine Guthrie is a freelance writer who also happens to be a yoga instructor in Bloomington, Ind.

Yoga and its impact on chronic inflammatory autoimmune arthritis

One of the most prevalent chronic inflammatory immunological illnesses, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has a negative impact on the quality of life since it is debilitating. It is uncertain what causes Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), but it appears that both hereditary and environmental variables influence one’s vulnerability to the condition. An extensive array of inflammatory cytokines, cytotoxic agents, and immune regulatory factors are released, which contributes to both the severity and course of the disease.

Despite the lack of a cure, mind-body therapies may be effective in controlling the condition.

In this section, we will review the characteristics of RA and how Yoga may be utilized as a therapeutic regimen to enhance the quality of life of individuals suffering from the disease.

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7 Calming Yoga Poses for Autoimmune Disease

Living with an autoimmune illness may feel like being on a roller coaster — from flare-ups to being in a state of remission to the discomfort of chronic inflammation and everything in between. Yoga, on the other hand, may be used to reduce inflammation and boost immunity in a natural way. Uncontrolled immune response of the body to chemicals and tissues that are typically present in the body results in an autoimmune illness, which is a pathological condition (1). We normally rely on our immune system to keep us healthy by protecting us from sickness and infection.

  • Even though it is still unclear what causes autoimmune diseases, it is known that they can be passed on genetically and that women are more likely than males to be diagnosed with them (2).
  • There are 80 documented autoimmune disorders, and some of them have symptoms that are identical to one another, making diagnosis difficult and distressing.
  • Here’s how to have tighter abs, sculpted arms, and toned legs in 3 weeks!
  • Autoimmune illness may be irritating, inconvenient, and sometimes devastating for those who are affected by it.
  • Yoga has been shown to reduce stress. Yoga promotes a sense of tranquility and well-being in the practitioner. Stress is reduced as a result of this sensation of calm, which lowers the production of stress hormones that damage the immune system (3). Yoga has been shown to boost immunity. As a result, yoga increases the activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (our rest and digest state), which lessens the body’s stress reaction (our fight or flight state) and aids in the restoration of balance to the neurological system. This has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the immune system. Yoga also helps to condition the lungs and respiratory tract by activating the lymphatic system, expelling toxins from the body, and pulling oxygenated blood back into various organs to guarantee optimal functioning. Yoga also has anti-inflammatory properties, which helps to decrease inflammation. Yoga practice has been demonstrated to lower levels of inflammatory markers in the body when done on a regular basis. When the immune system sends out additional white blood cells without finding anything harmful to target, they can cause inflammation in neighboring healthy tissue (4). Yoga is a form of meditation that promotes inner serenity. Yin yoga techniques, such as meditation and soothing yoga postures, can assist you in developing an inner connection by teaching you how to shift your attention away from pain or suffering and into a pleasant state of being. It provides you with skills to help you divert your attention away from the discomfort. As part of the yoga practice, you learn to pay attention to your body and to treat yourself with respect and care, acknowledging and honoring what your body requires.
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7 Calming Yoga Poses for Autoimmune Disease

It is necessary to have a long cushion, two yoga blocks, and a towel or blanket for this activity.

Kapalabhati

This pranayama (breathing method) is also known as “Skull Shining Breath,” and it is well-known for its capacity to invigorate, clear the lungs and nasal passages, and clear the mind, among other things (5). During this method, the emphasis is on exhaling strongly and forcefully while inhaling passively and naturally. Notably, this breathing method should not be used by women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

  1. On your mat, place a block in the center, then sit on the block with your legs crossed in the middle of the block. Place your left hand on your left thigh, with the palm of your right hand facing up, and your right palm on your belly
  2. Close your eyes and begin to take deep breaths in and out through your nostrils. When you are ready to begin, take a deep inhale through your nose, followed by a sharp, powerful exhale through your nose while simultaneously drawing your navel up and in towards your spine to tense your abs
  3. After you are through, repeat the process. Inhale naturally as you allow your abs to extend back out, then exhale sharply as you return to the start. Continue to exhale in fast succession, with about one exhalation per second, for a total of twenty breaths. Allow your breathing to return to normal when you have completed the last exhale. After you have taken a time to notice how you are feeling, carefully open your eyes and bring your awareness back to the room

Downward Facing Dog

Using this easy inversion to relieve tension and anxiety while simultaneously increasing flexibility may be quite useful (6).

  1. Begin in a tabletop posture, on your hands and knees, with your arms extended. Take a few steps forward with your hands, so that your wrists are in front of your shoulders. As you begin to straighten your legs and raise your hips up towards the sky, tuck your toes under and squeeze your hands together. As you pull your navel in towards your spine and squeeze your chest into your thighs, raise your tailbone and lift your hips off the ground. Make an effort to keep your back straight. Take 8 calm breaths in and out of your belly button while gazing there.

Keeping your knees bent while holding this position might help if your lower back is feeling stiff.

Supported Shoulder Stand

This position compresses the thyroid and parathyroid glands, which aids in the regulation of metabolism and immune function (7).

  1. Begin by laying down on your back with a block propped up on one side of your body. Place your arms down beside your body. Lie down on your back. Draw your chin down towards your chest to keep your neck as long as possible
  2. Bend your knees and set your feet on the mat, hip-width apart, to maintain your posture. Bridge position is achieved by pressing your feet into the ground and lifting your hips high. Slide the block beneath your hips, preferably at the lowest or medium height, and descend your sacrum down onto the block to relieve pressure. Get off of the mat with your feet and straighten your legs up such that your feet are pointed towards the ceiling. The block should provide you with a feeling of support in your lower back and shoulders. Maintain the position of your palms facing down. Close your eyes and take 8 slow ujjayi breaths
  3. Repeat 8 times.

Reclined Cobblers

Laying down on your back with a block on one side is a good place to start. Your arms should be parallel to your torso. To maintain your neck long, draw your chin down towards your chest. Bend your knees and rest your feet on the mat so that they are hip-width distance apart. Lift your hips up into a bridge stance by pressing onto your feet. Inserting the block beneath your hips and lowering your sacrum onto the block, depending on its height (lowest or medium). Get off of the mat with your feet and straighten your legs up such that your feet are pointed toward the ceiling.

Maintain a downward position with your palms.

  1. Starting at the top of your mat and working your way down, place a bolster or long cushion vertically up and down. Using a bolster, position yourself in front of the bolster, with your knees bent and your feet flat on the mat
  2. Repeat on the other side. Walking with your feet together all the way, then allowing your knees to fall out wide is recommended. Maintain contact between the soles of your feet. Grab your blocks and slip one block beneath each leg to provide support
  3. Place your hands behind you and slowly drop your back into the bolster
  4. Repeat with the other blocks. Your buttocks should remain firmly planted on the ground. Put your arms out by your sides and flip your palms up so that they are facing up. For 3-5 minutes, close your eyes and keep the position.

Supported Upright Angle

The hips and hamstrings are opened up as a result of this stance. It also aids in the discharge of tension and the attainment of a state of serenity.

  1. Begin by sitting on your yoga mat with a bolster or long cushion in front of you for support. Separate your feet wide apart, with the tips of your toes pointing up towards the heavens. Placing one end of the bolster between your legs
  2. Putting a wrapped up towel or blanket on the far end of the bolster and slowly lowering your head down into it
  3. Placing your forearms on each side of the bolster and closing your eyes Allow yourself to totally relax and remain in this position for 3-5 minutes

Viparita Karani with Baddha Konasana Legs

This calming position helps to transfer energy upwards inside the body, allowing your body to relax and fall into a comfortable state of relaxation.

  1. Put a block to one side and sit next to the wall with your legs parallel to the wall. Repeat this process on the other side. Stretch out your legs up the wall by rolling back and sliding them up
  2. Bending your knees and pressing your feet against the wall will elevate your hips. Adjust your posture by sliding the block below your sacrum and extending your legs up the wall. Then, bending your knees, bring the soles of your feet together, allowing your knees to fall out wide, is the next step. Spread your arms out wide by your sides, palms facing up, and relax your shoulders. Close your eyes and take a deep breath in naturally. Allow the muscle in your face to relax for 5 minutes and then release it.

Yoga Nidra Savasana

Yoga Nidra, also known as “Yogic Sleep,” is a meditation practice that allows for complete relaxation, putting us into a state of profound relaxation and allowing us to release stress and tension.

  1. Lie down on the floor in a comfortable Savasana, or corpse posture, to begin your practice. Change the orientation of your hands so that they are facing up, and spread your feet wide, allowing your toes to fall outward. Prepare yourself by getting comfy and closing your eyes. 3 deep breaths in through your nose, out through your mouth
  2. Gradually expand your awareness over the entirety of your body Begin by focusing on the tips of your toes, feeling each toe separately. Begin with your feet and work your way up through your ankles, up through your shins and calves, to your knees and thighs, and finally to your hips. Examine your stomach and back all the way up to your shoulders, down your arms, to your hands, and all the way down to your fingers. Return your attention up your arms and shoulders to your neck and throat, up the back of your head and through your ears, chin, lips, nose, and eyes until you reach the top of your head
  3. Then turn your attention to your breathing, notice where your inhales fill up your body and how long your breaths last between inhalations. Without passing judgment, take note of any additional thoughts that enter your mind and simply watch them drift back out. Draw your consciousness back to your body and then to the room after a few minutes when you are ready, slowly allowing yourself to emerge out of it. Open your eyes and blink them open

6. Restorative Yoga Poses for Adrenal Fatigue (Your Next Workout: 6 Restorative Yoga Poses for Adrenal Fatigue) A certified personal trainer with the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM), Kelly is also a Registered Yoga Teacher with the Yoga Alliance and holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Kinesiology from San Diego State University. She is a co-owner of Roaming Yogi Adventures, a yoga and adventure retreat in the mountains of Colorado. The answer, she feels, is to engage in enjoyable and well-rounded exercise in order to maximize one’s strength, flexibility, and mental health.

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How does your immune system respond when it isn’t functioning properly? Instead of safeguarding the body against foreign antibodies, the immune system begins to target the body itself. autoimmune disorders are responsible for a wide range of diseases and conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and Type 1 diabetes. Despite the fact that the majority of such conditions are chronic, they are not lethal. Living with an auto-immune condition, on the other hand, can be quite difficult.

  1. In the majority of situations, one must also be on the lookout for things that might exacerbate their disease.
  2. However, treatments such as anti-inflammatory drugs, which can help to lessen discomfort, can help to manage them.
  3. It appears from anecdotal data that yoga is effective not only in alleviating symptoms such as inflammation, but it may also assist to reduce the potential of the immune system to misfire and produce these very symptoms.
  4. In fact, it has the potential to increase our total fitness, as well as our mental and physical flexibility.
  5. Taking a comprehensive approach One of the most important aspects of yoga is its emphasis on a holistic approach to wellness.
  6. Consequently, it takes a completely different approach from traditional medicine, which primarily concentrates on treating the symptoms of the disease.
  7. A yogic attitude to life encourages us to look within and to be more conscious of our general health and well-being.

Yoga has been shown to be particularly useful in the management of stress, anxiety, and depression, according to research.

Yoga’s stress-relieving benefits, on the other hand, are not limited to the treatment of medical conditions.

Furthermore, the likelihood of developing such diseases is higher among younger people.

Taking care of auto-immune illnesses Yoga, in addition to lowering stress, may be beneficial in a variety of different ways while dealing with an auto-immune condition, particularly when it comes to relieving pain caused by inflammation.

Among the psycho-somatic symptoms of the disorders were pain perception, joint flexibility, and disability quotient.

Women, in particular, suffer from auto-immune illnesses, which are among the primary causes of chronic illness1.

Yoga can not only assist us in managing these disorders by lessening their severity, but it may also be beneficial in the prevention of these conditions.

However, as the 10th International Conference on Yoga and Mental Health explored, yoga should only be practiced under the supervision of experienced yoga instructors in order to be effective.

Kaivalyadhama, the author, is the CEO of a company. (Disclaimer: The opinions mentioned here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of DNA.)

How Yoga Helped Me Manage My Autoimmune Disease

When I was growing up and during college, I was constantly ill. Despite the fact that I’ve always enjoyed athletics, I found it difficult to push myself and found myself feeling abnormally sore afterward. When I learned that physicians were dismissive of common symptoms such as dry skin, constipation, exhaustion, and muscle and joint pain after years of being urged to toughen up, I began to assume that I was simply weak. To tell the truth, I was suffering from an autoimmune condition, which wasn’t discovered until I was 25 years old, in 2005.

  • This system of glands produces hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, cortisol, adrenaline, and a variety of other hormones that govern everything from mood to sleep to metabolism in the human body.
  • As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, around 8 percent of the population is affected by autoimmune illnesses, with women accounting for 78% of those affected.
  • Western medicine knows relatively little about what causes, treats, and prevents autoimmunity, and it has much less knowledge on how to treat and prevent it.
  • We must take better care of ourselves and be more conscious of what we eat, how we live, and how we employ our physical bodies.
  • I am now a certified alternative medicine practitioner.
  • As a result, I’ve experimented with a variety of drugs, vitamins, and diets, and I’m pleased to report that my health has much improved as of late.
  • Looking back, I can see that this was not the case at the time of my diagnosis; I was sick, and I was extremely unwell.
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It wasn’t immediately apparent, but a daily yoga practice was so wonderfully useful for my circulation, detoxification, and stress level that my physical health began to improve as a result of the frequent practice.

I found myself needing less and less medication.

For example, if I ate well, it showed up in my performance in practice.

Yoga allowed me to discover how my body truly felt.

Thankfulness emerged when I let go of bitterness and worry, not only about the thyroid condition, but also about other unhealthy attachments that I had previously had, and from there I discovered gratitude.

I am grateful for everything.

Yoga did not cure me, but it provided me with the tools I needed to take care of myself and started me on the path to better health.

However, even if I still have terrible days or even setbacks, I take pleasure in the progress that takes place each day, I learn from the experience, and I continue to appreciate myself.

The moment it becomes difficult, the moment I begin to forget, I force myself to remember and return to my yoga mat. Do you want to transform your interest in health and wellness into a rewarding career? Become a Certified Health Coach by completing this course. More information may be found here.

Yoga regimen reduces severity of rheumatoid arthritis symptoms: New research supports adding yoga as an adjunctive therapy to treat this chronic inflammatory disease

I was always ill throughout my childhood and college. Though sports were always a passion of mine, I had difficulty pushing myself and seemed to be perpetually sore after participating in any exercise. When I learned that physicians were dismissive of common symptoms such as dry skin, constipation, exhaustion, and muscle and joint pain after years of being urged to “toughen up,” I began to assume that I was simply weak. When it came down to it, I was suffering from an autoimmune condition that wasn’t identified until 2005, when I was 25 years old.

  1. The human endocrine system is a complex network of glands that create hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, cortisol, adrenaline, and a variety of others that govern everything from mood to sleep and metabolism.
  2. The thyroid is the driving power of this system.
  3. Approximately 22 million Americans are affected by autoimmune disorders such as Lupus, Multiple Sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, and Rheumatoid Arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control.
  4. The alternative theories, on the other hand, hold that nutrition, environment, and way of life may all be triggers, which is what I think as well.
  5. Since my condition, Hashimoto’s, does not pose a significant health risk other than a reduction in quality of life, I have dedicated countless hours to educating myself on alternative therapies, nutrition, and overall wellness.
  6. In order to be the strongest and most healthy version of myself, I have made a commitment to myself.
  7. Not everything has worked, and I have experienced some disappointing setbacks, but I am no longer on medicine, and I consider myself to be in good physical and mental health.

My yoga practice was the driving force behind this change in my health.

My strength and stamina were increasing, and my mood had much improved.

Meanwhile, my yoga practice required me to pay close attention to the changes taking place in my body.

As I made modifications to my food and supplement regimen, I noticed that doing the same asanas every day began to indicate what was working and what wasn’t.

Above all else, in the silence of my practice, once my thoughts had quieted down, I was able to turn my attention inside and begin to appreciate myself.

The thankfulness I had for my path, for the lovely, able body that I have, and the realization that being connected and present, breathing deeply, and learning to love yourself can help you get healthy.

However, yoga did not cure me; rather, it provided me with the tools I needed to take care of myself and started me on the path to better health.

Despite the fact that I still have difficult days or even setbacks, I like the progress that I experience on a daily basis, I learn from the experience, and I continue to value myself.

You have a strong desire to make a profession out of your enthusiasm for wellness. Acquire your Certification as a Professional Health Coach! You may find out more information by visiting this link:

In a recent study published in IOS Press, researchers found that a yoga program can lower the intensity of rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. This suggests that yoga can be used as an adjuvant therapy to treat this chronic inflammatory condition. ScienceDaily. The 5th of February, 2019, according to ScienceDaily. IOS Press is a publishing house based in New York City. (5th of February, 2019). A yoga program can lower the intensity of rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, according to new study. Yoga can be used as an adjuvant therapy to treat this chronic inflammatory condition, the researchers say.

The IOS Press website was accessed on February 5, 2022.

Yoga can be used as an adjuvant therapy to treat this chronic inflammatory condition,” the researchers write.

Yoga for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): Clinician experiences and qualitative perspectives from students and yoga instructors living with SLE

Open access is granted under a Creative Commons license.

Highlights

Open access is granted under the Creative Commons license.

Abstract

Inflammation and tissue destruction are common features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune illness that affects the whole body. It is more prevalent and severe among African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asians, with a greater frequency among females than among males. Despite the fact that the aim of medical therapy are to avoid flares and minimize organ damage, up to 50% of patients believe that their health is unsatisfactory, with unmet demands such as tiredness and discomfort being unmet.

Yoga has been demonstrated to enhance quality of life and tiredness in people with a variety of diseases.

Methods/setting

An ancillary research was conducted to investigate the feasibility of adapting theYoga as Self Care for Arthritis in Minority Communitiesstudy for a multilingual group of people living with SLE in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Informants comprised seven patients who were included in the trial as well as three yoga teachers who had SLE. Journals and semi-structured interviews were among the qualitative tools used.

Results

Patients who were enrolled provided clarification on adjustments to intake questionnaires as well as symptoms that might interfere with class attendance. When compared to the participants in the original study, the participants in this study displayed improved balance and body awareness, as well as the ability to withstand a faster-paced yoga session. Yoga instructors’ instructions included adapting yoga to accommodate fluctuating energy levels and changes in physical capabilities on a regular basis.

Conclusion

This report presents insights from a variety of sources and demonstrates that it is feasible to move forward with a broader investigation.

It describes our findings and makes recommendations for the development of a randomized controlled trial, as there are presently no such studies in the literature to guide future research.

Abbreviations

SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus) CAM (cancer of the cervix) medicine that is complementary and alternative CIH (Complementary and Integrative Health) is an abbreviation for complementary and integrative health. NIAMS The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease) CHC (community health clinic) is an abbreviation for Community Health Clinic. NIDDK The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) IRBinstitutional review boardNational Institutes of Health National Institutes of HealthRCT (randomized controlled trial)randomized controlled trial CINAHL (Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health) is a searchable database of nursing and allied health information.

Keywords

Yoga Systemic lupus erythematosus is a kind of autoimmune disease. Minority Qualitative techniques are those that are used to evaluate something. BilingualJournalsNarratives.com is a trademark of the authors. Elsevier Ltd. is the publisher.

Most and least recommended types of yoga when you have lupus

Interested in giving yoga a shot? Even while there are no hard and fast rules concerning which yoga disciplines are suggested, some are more likely to assist alleviate lupus symptoms than others, and some are even harmful to the condition. According to Kathy Salvo, yoga teacher and group fitness director at Chelsea Piers fitness facility in Stamford, Connecticut, “hot yoga, for example, should be avoided since it causes inflammation in persons with lupus.” A restorative yoga practice, such as yin yoga, can assist to release ligaments and muscles that have become extremely stiff and damaged.

Exercising or engaging in any activity that is excessively demanding might be too exhausting and produce muscular discomfort, which can result in inflammation.

Most recommended yoga styles for people with lupus

Restorative yoga is mellow and slow-moving, and it contains longer holds, which allows your body to achieve a deeper level of relaxation. When performing each posture, you can utilize props to ensure that your body is adequately supported, such as blankets, bolster pillows, and yoga blocks.

Iyengar

The alignment of the body is the most important aspect of this form of yoga. To ensure that you are working within a safe and effective range of motion, Iyengar employs props such as yoga blocks and blankets, as well as straps or a ropes wall to assist you. The Iyengar postures, in contrast to the fluid motions of Vinyasa, are maintained for a longer amount of time. It’s a method that’s frequently advised for those who have injuries.

Hatha

This workshop is designed to provide a moderate introduction to yoga postures and techniques.

Props may be utilized to assist in the execution of each posture.

Least recommended yoga styles for people with lupus

Generally speaking, this session offers a light introduction to various yoga positions. In order to produce each stance, props may be employed.

Yoga styles to approach with caution

This workshop is designed to provide a gentle introduction to basic yoga postures and techniques. Props may be utilized to aid in the execution of each posture.

Yoga Moves to Ease RA Pain

Finding innovative strategies to relieve the discomfort associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be difficult. Give yoga a shot. Researchers have discovered that particular movements help alleviate various forms of chronic pain, including the aches and pains associated with RA. Yoga also helps to keep you flexible, allows you to move more effortlessly, and helps to reduce tension and anxiety. It may even aid in your ability to sleep better. It also makes it simpler to manage pain and other symptoms during the day when you get a good night’s sleep.

What Does the Science Say?

Several research have looked at what occurs when persons with RA practice yoga over a period of several weeks to find out what happens. This is what a couple of them discovered. According to a 2012 assessment of eight previous research, yoga provides several benefits for persons who have arthritis. Despite the fact that the majority of trials were small and brief, they showed that yoga might help with pain. People with RA who practiced yoga said that they were able to move more freely and felt better overall.

  1. While the ladies in the research reported that they were still in pain, they claimed that they were better able to tolerate and manage it.
  2. A 2015 research of 75 persons who had been sedentary for a long period of time discovered that eight weeks of yoga might alleviate RA symptoms.
  3. People reported decreased discomfort after practicing yoga, which was only one of the numerous benefits.
  4. A review of 15 trials on yoga and tai chi for patients with RA or another rheumatic illness published in 2018 found that the effects of tai chi were inconclusive.
  5. It also had a positive impact on the overall quality of life.
  6. Participants in yoga for 12 weeks had lower disease activity and inflammation levels than those who only received standard medical care over the same period.

Try These Poses

Yoga classes are typically 45 minutes to an hour in length. However, if you practice a few postures on your own for a few minutes many times a week, you may reap the advantages. Here are several positions that professionals prescribe for persons who are suffering from arthritis. If you find that any of the positions are too tough to begin with, it is simple to adjust them. Use a mat, pillow, or folded blanket to cushion your knees while you’re working out. Consider doing the posture while seated in a chair or leaning against a wall, rather than while standing.

  1. Pose with a cat and a cow.
  2. While lowering your head and tucking your rear end, round your back toward the ceiling and drop your head.
  3. Pose in a chair.
  4. Raise your arms over your head and take a deep breath in.
  5. Folding inward is a forward fold.
  6. Allow your arms to hang freely as you bend forward.
  7. Raise your left hand over your head and bend your right knee.
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Pose at an angle to the side.

Turn your right foot out to a 90-degree angle and the other to a 45-degree angle about halfway.

Return to the center and repeat the process on the other side.

Lie face down on the floor with your palms on the ground near your chest.

Leg balance with extended legs.

Raise the second leg slowly and carefully.

Repeat the process with the opposite leg.

Spinal twist when seated. Place your legs outstretched in front of you as you sit. Cross one leg over the other to make a U-shape. By grabbing the inside of your crossed leg’s knee with your opposite hand and twisting while maintaining your spine straight and tall

Safety Checks

Classes usually run 45 minutes to an hour and are led by an instructor. In contrast, performing a few postures on your own for a few minutes several times a week may be beneficial to your health. For persons suffering from arthritic discomfort, here are several positions that specialists recommend: Alternatively, if you find any of the positions too challenging to begin with, you may easily adjust them. Use a mat, pillow, or folded blanket to cushion your knees while you’re doing this exercise.

  • You may also try holding the posture with your arms at your sides if it hurts to raise them above your head.
  • While lowering your head and tucking your rear end, round your back toward the ceiling.
  • Poses for sitting on a chair Take a few steps back.
  • After then, stoop as if you were about to sit in a chair and lower your arms halfway down.
  • Allow your arms to hang freely as you bend your body forward.
  • Raising and bending your left hand above your head to the right is a good exercise for your left hand muscles.
  • Pose with your body at an angle to the left or right Maintain a 4-foot distance between your feet.

While extending your other arm above your head, bend your right knee and bring your elbow to rest on it.

Cobra.

Make use of your upper back muscles to lift your head, neck, and back.

Put your weight on one foot and stand up straight.

Placing your hand on the inside of the knee of your elevated leg and bringing it out to the side can help you balance.

Sitting spinal twisting is an exercise that may be done anywhere.

One leg should be crossed over the other.

Yoga for Rheumatoid Arthritis

People suffering from rheumatoid arthritis might benefit from a regular yoga practice on both a physical and psychological level (RA). Exercises such as yoga have been demonstrated to enhance flexibility and make ordinary physical tasks such as walking more manageable for persons suffering from arthritis. Regular yoga practice can also assist to reduce inflammation and discomfort, which can aid in the improvement of mobility. Yoga has also been demonstrated to promote the mental well-being of those suffering from RA by assisting them in accepting their condition and developing a more positive and self-empowered view on their situation.

Yoga can also be beneficial for persons who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis in terms of anxiety and sadness. Theresa Chiechi’s “Verywell” is a song about a woman who is very well.

How Yoga Benefits Rheumatoid Arthritis

When the immune system targets the body’s tissues, most often the joints, it causes inflammation. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory illness that affects the joints and other body tissues (painful swelling). Chronic pain, limited joint mobility, and exhaustion are just a few of the symptoms that can occur as a result of this condition. When these symptoms manifest themselves, they might create major disturbances in one’s regular routine. A family of pharmaceuticals known as anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDS) can help reduce the course of RA, despite the fact that there is currently no cure.

The treatment has the potential to significantly enhance the physical and mental well-being of those suffering with RA.

Pain and Inflammation

When the immune system targets the body’s tissues, most often the joints, it causes inflammation. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory illness that affects the joints (painful swelling). Chronic pain, limited joint mobility, and weariness are just a few of the symptoms that might occur as a result. When these symptoms manifest themselves, they might create major disruptions in one’s everyday routine. While there is currently no treatment for RA, physiotherapy and a family of pharmaceuticals known as anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDS) can both assist to halt the disease’s course.

The possibility for physical and emotional improvement in the quality of life for those with RA exists.

Depression and Stress

Meditation and yoga have been shown to foster awareness, which can aid in the development of greater resilience while dealing with the stress of a chronic disease. In one study, young women with RA who practiced yoga twice a week for six weeks had significant improvements in a variety of mental health characteristics, including mood, personal agency, and acceptance. Because yoga provides mental treatments that make it easier to comprehend, accept, and tolerate the problems of rheumatoid arthritis, it can help persons with the condition feel less depressed and stressed than they otherwise would.

Flexibility and Range of Motion

It is most commonly found in the hands, ankles, and knees. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause limited range of motion in these joints, making it difficult to carry out daily tasks. Because of this, people may become sedentary and immobile, which can lead to various health concerns such as weight gain. It is possible that yoga will make it simpler for a person to move and participate in physical activity without experiencing discomfort.

Yoga has been demonstrated to increase balance, hand grasp, flexibility, and strength, to name a few characteristics. These advantages make it simpler for a person to walk and participate in other physical activities, both of which are beneficial to overall physical well-being.

The Importance of Exercise for RA Management

Adults with arthritis should attempt to achieve at least 150 minutes of moderate physical exercise each week in order to reap the most significant health advantages. This may be divided into more manageable chunks of time. Some physical exercise is preferable to none at all.

What a Typical Yoga Session Looks Like

Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate physical exercise each week for adults with arthritis in order to reap the most significant health advantages. Shorter spans of time can be substituted for the longer ones. It is preferable to engage in some physical exercise than none at all.

  • Restorative yoga is a type of yoga that uses long, slow holds and props to enhance mobility and flexibility without putting pressure on the body. It is recommended that patients with RA practice this style of yoga since it allows them to include meditation and mindfulness into their practice. Hatha yoga: Consists of sitting, standing, kneeling, and balancing postures performed at a slow and deliberate tempo. In this more physical yoga practice, you may include supports and modifications to make it work for your body and reduce strain
  • It is also more challenging. Yin yoga is a kind of yoga that uses lengthy holds to open the connective tissues in the body. Despite the fact that this slow yoga practice is primarily sitting, it is not as restorative as restorative yoga.

Beginner Tips

The practice of yoga might appear frightening at first, but it’s vital to remember that it is a therapeutic activity that is intended to help you feel better. Here are some other suggestions to keep in mind:

  • Keep in mind that there is no “correct” or “wrong” method to practice yoga. It is preferable to adjust a position to match your specific needs rather than pushing yourself too far. If you feel any pain, pinching, burning, or other unpleasant feelings, stop immediately.

The first step is always the most difficult. The more you practice yoga, the more secure and comfortable you will feel in your body. Although it may be tempting to push through the discomfort, it is vital to practice only when you are not experiencing an acute flare-up. This will keep you from being hurt and will allow your body time to rest.

Finding a Teacher

When looking for a yoga instructor, it is beneficial to choose someone who has previous experience working with persons who have rheumatoid arthritis. An expert yoga instructor or a yoga therapist will be able to recognize and work around your limits. As well as making prop recommendations and providing alterations, they will be able to propose and give alternate positions. This will guarantee that persons with RA have a pleasant, therapeutic practice that provides them with the most possible advantages.

Resources for At-Home Yoga

A yoga instructor that has expertise working with persons who have rheumatoid arthritis is beneficial when looking for one. What you are experiencing is understandable to an experienced yoga instructor or yoga therapist. As well as making prop suggestions and providing changes, they will be able to propose and give alternate positions. As a result, RA patients will be treated in a pleasant and therapeutic manner, reaping the most possible advantages.

  • Yoga with Adriene on YouTube: Provides beginner’s guidance on postures as well as particular sessions meant to help the knees, hands, chronic pain, and other areas of the body. In addition to a variety of beginner-friendly films under 30 minutes in length that are accessible and easy to follow, SarahBethYoga has a YouTube channel. Yogi Kassandra’s YouTube channel offers a variety of alternatives for learning how to perform yin yoga
  • Free, fast yoga videos are available in categories such as beginner’s yoga, morning yoga, and mindfulness in the Yoga for Beginners app. The FitOn app includes yoga videos at a variety of skill levels, ranging from beginner to intermediate, all of which are geared toward safely increasing strength and flexibility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Healthcare Provider Discussion Guide

Yoga with Adriene on YouTube: Provides beginner’s guidance on postures as well as particular sessions geared to help the knees, hands, chronic pain, and other areas of concern. A variety of beginner-friendly videos under 30 minutes in length that are accessible and easy to follow may be found on SarahBethYoga’s YouTube channel: You may learn how to do yin yoga from Yoga with Kassandra on YouTube, which has many different alternatives for you. Free, fast yoga videos are available in categories such as beginner’s yoga, morning yoga, and mindfulness yoga on the Yoga for Beginners app: The FitOn app: Provides yoga videos at a variety of skill levels, from beginner to intermediate, that are geared toward safely increasing strength and flexibility.

Yoga Poses for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Not all yoga postures will be appropriate for persons who have RA.

several of them entail applying pressure to joints that may be impacted by RA, for example The following are the greatest yoga positions for rheumatoid arthritis:

  • Tree posture: This one-legged standing stance encourages mental attention, which helps to maintain balance. Practicing this will help you build mental toughness while also gently expanding your hips and strengthening your legs. The seated cat cow stance helps to increase spinal mobility by positioning the body in a comfortable position. Low back discomfort and spinal stiffness can be relieved by gently arching your back forth and backward without putting weight on your knees. Savasana (corpse position): Also referred to as savasana, this pose comprises lying down on the floor and connecting with your breath and body in order to decrease tension

Modifying Yoga Poses

Individuals with RA can utilize supports and modify yoga practices that might otherwise put strain on their joints in addition to adopting more appropriate poses for their condition. When it comes to making your yoga practice more comfortable, props may be utilized in a variety of different ways. The following are the best yoga props for rheumatoid arthritis:

  • A bolster is a piece of equipment that provides comfortable support below your body in poses such as child’s pose, legs up the wall, and reclining twists. Rolling or folding blankets to offer comfort beneath or behind the knees is a good idea. Furthermore, they can provide additional neck support when lying down. Modified yoga postures may be performed in a chair, which is especially beneficial for those who suffer from severe stiffness and immobility or who are inactive.

It’s vital to consult with your doctor before beginning a new exercise plan for rheumatoid arthritis, just as it is with any other new regimen. This might assist you in selecting the most appropriate yoga program for you.

A Word From Verywell

Yoga is an excellent self-management method for persons suffering with rheumatoid arthritis, since it helps them to manage their physical symptoms as well as the emotional effect of living with a difficult chronic illness like the disease. There is a growing body of scientific research demonstrating that persons suffering with RA may become more active and carry on with their daily activities with less discomfort if they engage in a regular yoga practice on a regular basis. Stress and frustration associated with RA can be managed by yoga, which can be beneficial for those suffering from the illness.

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