Bill Frisell: The Intercontinentals

The Intercontinentals — Bill Frisell

Award nomination for Best World Music Album at the 2003 Grammy Awards. Bass, electric and acoustic guitars, and looping systems are used by Bill Frisell. Sidiki Camara performs on calabash, djembe, congas, and other percussion instruments as well as vocals. Vinicius Cantuaria performs on electric and acoustic guitars, as well as vocals, drums, percussion, and other instruments. The band is led by oud player, vocalist and bouzouki player Christos Govetas Greg Leisz – slide guitars, pedal steel guitar, and other instruments Jenny Scheinman performs on violin, with production by Lee Towns.

Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound in New York City handled the mastering.

The book is no longer in print.

The following compositions are by Bill Frisell (Friz-Tone Music/BMI), with the exception of “Baba Drame” by Boubacar Traore, published by Labei Bleu (SACEM); “Procissao” by Gilberto Gil, published by BMG Arabella (BMI); “The Young Monk,” a traditional composition; “Yala” by Christos Govetas, published by Govetas Music (ASCAP); and ”

  1. Boubacar, Good Old People, For Christos, Baba Drame, Listen, Anywhere Road, Procissao, The Young Monk, We Are Everywhere, Yala, Perritos, Magic, Eli, and Remember are some of the songs on this album.

Reviews

“A fantastic feat – a hybrid that somehow respects and surpasses the styles that have been included into the piece. It’s country music from the global community, and it has an earthy, laid-back vibe to it.” -Washington Post et al. “Perhaps what is required is a new sort of global music, one that genuinely reflects an openhearted meeting of the minds of people from vastly different cultural backgrounds. Although the experiment has been going on for decades in mainstream music, it has rarely reached the level of synthesis attained on a new CD by jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, whose work is truly unique.

International performers weave together seemingly disparate musical traditions and genres to create a silky tapestry that is practically seamless and seamless to the eye.

Individual songs take on dominating cultural identities without diluting the intensity of the many aspects – in fact, individual tracks take on dominant cultural identities of their own.

Gate & Co.

However, nothing is predictable, and the true beauty of this album lies in the continual shocks it gives throughout the listening experience.

” -From the Los Angeles Times “There are no fillers on this tight, focused album, which is packed with thinking and tough things made to sound easy. When played gently, it has a lovely ripple effect. You can hear all sorts of wonderful things happening in the torque created by ouds, fiddles, pedal steel, electric and acoustic guitars as you turn the volume up. When three rotating arpeggios are subjected to a succession of highly textured melodic variations, the result is ‘Good Old People,’ which is about as beautiful as three rotated arpeggios can be.

To put it another way, Miles Davis will be watching and listening.

In the following years, he released a number of albums, including Ghost Town, Gone Just Like A Train, Blues Dream, Good Dog, Happy Man, and The Willies, which were all influenced by the various folk styles that originated on American soil, including country, blues (including bluegrass), field hollers, jazz, and others.

He is more driven by the concept of song than any other contemporary guitarist, both in terms of the musical and cultural expression it entails, and in terms of the implications it has for his work.

Frisell’s longtime collaborators Jenny Scheinman and Greg Leisz, as well as Brazilian mega-guitarist and songwriter Vinicius Cantuaria, Greek-Macedonian vocalist and oud player Christos Govetas, and Malian percussionist and vocalist Sidikki Camara, are all on board for this outing.

It had been a couple of years since Frisell had performed with Camara and Malian uber-guitarist Boubacar Traore, and he had been fascinated enough to look into the relationship further.

Throughout the album, he and Cantuaria delve into the modern Malian guitar and percussion sound pioneered by Ali Farka Toure; blend it with the timeless emotional resonance of Greek folk songs through Govetas’ oud and infectious Brazilian lyricism; and filter it through shimmering country landscapes and otherworldly string textures that reinvent harmonic properties to suit the lyric of the blues and song, indigenous folk musics, and the contemporary improvisational ideal.

The majority of the songs on this album were written by Frisell, although there are additional contributions from Gilberto Gil, Traore, Govetas, and Cantuaria as well.

Scheinman’s violin serves as a beautiful landmark for virtually all of these musicians to return to; her melodic That everything else in the mix fanned out and produces frequently contrapuntal backgrounds for graceful and lush, albeit thick, textures is what I find most intriguing, whether in the vocal tracks or in those where the Malian blues sound is the dominant force, is what I find most fascinating.

  • For want of a better phrase, this is the busiest record Frisell has released in years, although it doesn’t sound like it.
  • As separate as the oud and violin are, the guitars are carried into the next space by hand drums, which are themselves distinct from one another.
  • Though more collaborative than anything he’s done in the last decade, it nevertheless carries his signature in terms of sound and aesthetic.
  • Thom Jurek is a well-known author.
  • However, until Frisell’s The Intercontinentals, the rich, melancholy sound of Malian blues guitar had remained largely unexplored by six-stringed jazzoids and was mostly ignored by them.

Instead of attempting to encompass all of the band’s continents, the focus is largely on one: “Boubacar,” a song written in honor of Malian guitar pioneer Boubacar Traore, opens the set and is carried on by a cover of his song “Baba Drame,” and throughout the set, notes are struck and moods are invoked as if Ali Farka Toure were watching from Timbuktu.

  1. In Leisz’s steel, there’s a hint of American earthiness, while in Govetas’s oud, there’s a hint of the Mediterranean.
  2. The trio of oud, violin, and bass maintains a steady musical middle ground, seamlessly blending melody and rhythm in a wonderful manner.
  3. Andrew Bartlett is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom.
  4. Despite the fact that it utilizes improvisation at times, this blatantly diverse ensemble is primarily concerned with global music fusion.
  5. For Frisell, blending divergent sounds is second nature.

It is the ability of the ensemble – Christos Govetas, Vinicius Canturia, and Sidiki Camera – together with special guests violinist Jenny Scheinman and pedal steel guitarist Greg Leisz to merge while maintaining their own fundamental musical identities that is the secret to effective fusion music.

It is possible that The Intercontinentals, when viewed as a communal production rather than a showcase for his guitar performance, may be considered his masterpiece.

DOWNBEAT-REVIEW When Bill Frisell put together this worldwide ensemble of neo-gypsies, he recruited musicians from Brazil, Mali, Greece, Macedonia, and the United States to join him.

An unusual texture is created by the combination of the timbres of a studio full of stringed instruments (including various plucked and strung guitars, wavy lap and pedal steels, ancestral oud and sustained violin), human voices (Portuguese, Malian, and wordless), and delicate percussion, which leaves plenty of room for new improvisational and compositional ideas.

  1. Between-tune segues, which are frequently based on electronic loops, help to keep the music moving.
  2. Guitarist Bill Frisell has so many different musical characters that it’s hard to be astonished by anything he plays on stage.
  3. Beginning with the Brazilian composer-singer-guitarist Vinicius Cantuaria, the group also includes the Greek-Macedonian oud and bouzouki musician Christos Govetas, as well as Mali percussionist Sidiki Camara, violinist Jenny Scheinman, and pedal steel guitarist Greg Leisz.
  4. However, nothing is predictable, and the true beauty of this album lies in the continual shocks it gives throughout the listening experience.

The Intercontinentals – Wikipedia

The Intercontinentals
Studio albumbyBill Frisell
Released 2003
Genre World fusionEthno jazzFolk jazz
Length 70: 27
Label Elektra Nonesuch
Producer Lee Townsend
Bill Frisellchronology
The Willies(2002) The Intercontinentals(2003) Unspeakable(2004)

The Intercontinentalsis Bill Frisell’s sixteenth studio album, and it will be published on theElektra Nonesuchlabel. Released in 2003, the album includes appearances by musicians like as Frisell,Sidiki Camara,Vinicius Cantuaria, Christos Govetas, Greg Leisz, and Jenny Scheinman.

Reception

Professional ratings

Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic 86/100
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic
The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings

Metacritica awarded the album an overall score of 86 out of 100 based on seven critical reviews, which indicated “Universal Acclaim.” The response was very positive. Thom Jurek gave the album 4.5 stars in his Allmusic review, writing, “This is a magnificent album; it establishes a new high watermark for Frisell’s sense of adventure and taste, and presents his awareness of beauty in a pronounced, uncompromising, yet fully approachable way.”

Track listing

Metacritica gave the album an overall score of 86 out of 100 based on seven critical reviews, which indicated “Universal Acclaim.” The response was very good. Thom Jurek gave the album 4.5 stars in his Allmusic review, writing, “This is a fantastic album; it establishes a new benchmark for Frisell’s sense of adventure and taste, and demonstrates his awareness of beauty in a pronounced, uncompromising, yet fully approachable manner.”

  1. “Boubacar” (Traoré) – 6:13
  2. “Good Old People” (Traoré) – 5:25
  3. “For Christos” (Traoré) – 6:13
  4. “Listen” (Traoré) – 6:47
  5. “Anywhere Road” (Traoré) – 1:52
  6. “Procisso” (Gil) – 6:43
  7. “The Young Monk” (Traditional) – 2:

Personnel

  • Bass, electric and acoustic guitar, looping and percussion
  • Bill Frisell Sidiki Camara performs on calabash, djembe, congas, and other percussion instruments as well as vocals. Vinicius Cantuaria performs on electric and acoustic guitars, vocals, drums, and percussion
  • He is also a composer. Christos Govetas performs on oud, voice, and bouzouki. Jenny Scheinman plays violin, while Greg Leisz plays slide guitars and pedal steel guitar.

References

Purchased in the United States on August 21, 2013 and reviewed on August 22, 2013Verified Purchase This record has developed a strong emotional attachment to me over time. Bill Frisell’s CD is now my favorite Bill Frisell CD. It’s not jazz in the traditional sense, but it’s a good time. The music is influenced by both American and world folk music traditions. Frisell creates an incredible fusion of sounds and styles that somehow manage to work together harmoniously. To listen to it is a really peaceful and delightful experience.

  1. The majority of the music was composed by Frisell, although there are also pieces written by Gilberto Gil, Boubacar Traore, Govetas, and Cantuaria included.
  2. His collaborations with Bobby Previte and Marc Johnson were particularly memorable to me.
  3. It’s not like that here; it’s much more rootsy and traditional in style.
  4. On October 15, 2004, a review was conducted in the United States.
  5. The notion that Frisell is embarking into “uncharted ground” is ludicrous.
  6. However, some tracks, such as track 5, are not unfamiliar ground; in fact, they are nearly indistinguishable from any of Frisell’s previous albums.
  7. While acknowledging the importance of drawing inspiration from the great Boubacar, this album is probably my favorite of Frisell’s recent work, along with Ghost Town; and it would be recommended over Blues Dream, Good Dog, and some of the others.

As previously said, the tracks that use Boubacar as a cut-and-paste are lovely, if not necessarily greater than the sum of their parts; but, the other tunes (try track 3) are generic, uninspired, and all too familiar to Frisell fans.

Unfortunately, this appears to be Frisell’s approach much too frequently, and while it sounds like wonderful theory, it does not suit either of their respective works.

In either way, the more he commits, the better he performs.

It works about as well as when classical pieces are preceded with a Hungarian melody or something: it doesn’t work very well for me.

In order to persuade him to truly play lead guitar again, I believe we should approach Ginger Baker.

Purchase that has been verified Frisell has gathered a remarkable group of artists for his latest release, which is available now.

If you haven’t yet heard his solo album, “Vinicius,” you should do so immediately since it is a magnificent piece of art.

It comes highly recommended.

Enjoy!

Purchase that has been verified Very well done.

On December 29, 2014, a review was conducted in the United States.

He’s regarded as a national treasure around the world.

Purchase that has been verified On June 14, 2019, a review was conducted in the United States.

Jazz has a very African and Mediterranean tinge, to be sure.

Why is this so?

Despite the fact that Frisell appears to linger on each note, this song reminds me of John McLaughlin’s Shakti(s), but at a more leisurely tempo.

On June 7, 2003, a review was conducted in the United States.

A lovely evening of music was had by everybody.

According to whatever criteria you use, Jenny Scheinman (violin) and Greg Liesz (pedal steel guitar) have been added to the mix, with the result being an extraordinarily rich and incredibly satisfying blend of influences ranging from African to American to Macedonian to Brazilian to, among others, Brazilian.

Exotic and out of this world.

The group sound is practically transparent while still maintaining a velocity that engages and thrills the listener. In addition to being a fantastic composition, “We Are Everywhere” has one of the most lovely tunes Frisell has ever produced, “Listen.” Gorgeous.

Top reviews from other countries

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Fantastic: Frisell embarks on a Worldmusic journey. On April 24, 2012, a review was published in Germany. Purchase that has been verified This CD is without a doubt worthy of recommendation in my opinion! Bill Frisell infuses his music with a distinct sonic direction and a distinct sonic tone. And everyone who enjoys the music of Vinicius Cantuaria should also own the CD. Additionally, the 2011 album by both “Lagrimas Mexicanas” is highly recommended! 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Jazz that is good.

Purchase that has been verified One of Bill Frisell’s best-selling albums.

Purchase that has been verified 安定しているけど、して無いかのように演奏させたら世界一。 底の方にある、センス良い嗅覚が色んな人たちと不思議な音楽を作らせてますが、マニアックになり過ぎないところも高評価。 アンビエント系に多い自己満足絶対主義者的ではありません。 もちろん癒し系でもない、

The Intercontinentals by Bill Frisell on Amazon Music – Amazon.com

Purchased in the United States on August 21, 2013 and reviewed on August 22, 2013Verified Purchase This record has developed a strong emotional attachment to me over time. Bill Frisell’s CD is now my favorite Bill Frisell CD. It’s not jazz in the traditional sense, but it’s a good time. The music is influenced by both American and world folk music traditions. Frisell creates an incredible fusion of sounds and styles that somehow manage to work together harmoniously. To listen to it is a really peaceful and delightful experience.

  1. The majority of the music was composed by Frisell, although there are also pieces written by Gilberto Gil, Boubacar Traore, Govetas, and Cantuaria included.
  2. His collaborations with Bobby Previte and Marc Johnson were particularly memorable to me.
  3. It’s not like that here; it’s much more rootsy and traditional in style.
  4. On October 15, 2004, a review was conducted in the United States.
  5. The notion that Frisell is embarking into “uncharted ground” is ludicrous.
  6. However, some tracks, such as track 5, are not unfamiliar ground; in fact, they are nearly indistinguishable from any of Frisell’s previous albums.
  7. While acknowledging the importance of drawing inspiration from the great Boubacar, this album is probably my favorite of Frisell’s recent work, along with Ghost Town; and it would be recommended over Blues Dream, Good Dog, and some of the others.

As previously said, the tracks that use Boubacar as a cut-and-paste are lovely, if not necessarily greater than the sum of their parts; but, the other tunes (try track 3) are generic, uninspired, and all too familiar to Frisell fans.

Unfortunately, this appears to be Frisell’s approach much too frequently, and while it sounds like wonderful theory, it does not suit either of their respective works.

In either way, the more he commits, the better he performs.

It works about as well as when classical pieces are preceded with a Hungarian melody or something: it doesn’t work very well for me.

In order to persuade him to truly play lead guitar again, I believe we should approach Ginger Baker.

Purchase that has been verified Frisell has gathered a remarkable group of artists for his latest release, which is available now.

If you haven’t yet heard his solo album, “Vinicius,” you should do so immediately since it is a magnificent piece of art.

It comes highly recommended.

Enjoy!

Purchase that has been verified Very well done.

On December 29, 2014, a review was conducted in the United States.

He’s regarded as a national treasure around the world.

Purchase that has been verified On June 14, 2019, a review was conducted in the United States.

Jazz has a very African and Mediterranean tinge, to be sure.

Why is this so?

Despite the fact that Frisell appears to linger on each note, this song reminds me of John McLaughlin’s Shakti(s), but at a more leisurely tempo.

On June 7, 2003, a review was conducted in the United States.

A lovely evening of music was had by everybody.

According to whatever criteria you use, Jenny Scheinman (violin) and Greg Liesz (pedal steel guitar) have been added to the mix, with the result being an extraordinarily rich and incredibly satisfying blend of influences ranging from African to American to Macedonian to Brazilian to, among others, Brazilian.

Exotic and out of this world.

The group sound is practically transparent while still maintaining a velocity that engages and thrills the listener. In addition to being a fantastic composition, “We Are Everywhere” has one of the most lovely tunes Frisell has ever produced, “Listen.” Gorgeous.

Top reviews from other countries

Verified Purchase on August 21, 2013 in the United States of America Over time, I’ve grown to appreciate this record a great deal. Bill Frisell’s latest CD is currently my fave. It’s not jazz in the traditional sense, but it’s a good substitute. It draws inspiration from both American and world folk music in the composition of its songs. Bob Frisell creates an incredible fusion of sounds and styles that somehow manage to come together seamlessly. When you listen to it, it is incredibly soothing and delightful.

  • The majority of the music was composed by Frisell, although there are also pieces written by Gilberto Gil, Boubacar Traore, Govetas, and Cantuaria included in the collection.
  • Bobby Previte and Marc Johnson were two of the artists with whom I was most impressed.
  • His style is different here; this is more traditional.
  • On October 15, 2004, the United States Department of Justice issued a report.
  • I think it’s ridiculous to say that Frisell is entering “uncharted ground.” That which derives the most from Boubacar is considered to be the finest track.
  • Rather than taking creative risks, Frisell is willing to mostly serve as a session musician and studio manager.
  • NEWS AFTER A YEAR AFTER THE FIRST RELEASE: Having lived with it for a year now, I’d have to admit that it isn’t nearly as ethereal as I’d hoped.

My memory of Bruce Willis characterizing his approach to acting in the film “Unbreakable” as being “as little as possible” comes from an interview he gave years ago.

Being more subdued does not confine Frisell’s natural flamboyance or showiness; rather, it extinguishes the flame.

However, he spends far too much time in the center, putting down a basic atonal development of a few notes, and then rambling alongside it in the middle (tracks 3 and 13).

The music on this album is excellent in certain places.

On May 28, 2003, the United States Department of Justice released a report on the investigation.

Vinicius Cantuatria comes first and foremost.

If you haven’t listened to it yet, you should do so immediately.

This is a must-have.

Enjoy!

An very new Bill Frisell, and some of the melodies are so captivating that I can’t stop myself from listening to them again and again.

Purchase has been verified Anyone who knows Bill Frisell has nothing but praise for him.

United States: On August 17, 2021, a review will be conducted.

The music of jazz has a considerable African and Mediterranean influence on it.

Why is this so?

This song, despite the fact that Frisell appears to be concentrating on every note, reminds me of John McLaughlin’s Shakti(s), but it is performed at a more leisurely tempo.

On June 7, 2003, the United States Department of Justice released a report on the investigation.

Music lovers will have an excellent evening.

(sadly the two occasions they were to play together were postponed; first by the post 9-11 environment and secondly fallout surrounding the Iraq war).

Music that is just stunning to listen to!

Even though there is no traditional rhythm section, the music maintains a steady pulse that provides the impression of floating, much like a string ensemble.

The group’s sound is practically transparent while still maintaining a forward motion that is engaging and delightful to listen to. In addition to being a fantastic work, “We Are Everywhere” has one of the most lovely tunes Frisell has ever written, “Listen.” Gorgeous.

Bill Frisell – The Intercontinentals

1 Boubacar 6:13
2 Good Old People 5:25
3 For Christos 6:13
4 Baba DrameComposed By–Boubacar Traore * 5:18
5 Listen 6:47
6 Anywhere Road 1:52
7 ProcissãoComposed By–Gilberto Gil 6:46
8 The Young MonkComposed By–Traditional 2:23
9 We Are Everywhere 7:06
10 Yála 5:47
11 Perritos 4:33
12 Magic 5:54
13 Eli 4:15
14 Remember 1:36
  • Sidiki Camara performs on afoxé, djembe, congas, percussion, and vocals
  • Bill Frisell (tracks 1 to 3, 5, 6, 9, 12 to 14), Christos Govetas (tracks 10), and Vinicius Cantuaria * (tracks 11)
  • Bill Frisell (electric guitar, acoustic guitar, loops, bass)
  • Greg Calb

Seattle’s Studio Litho was used for the recording. Different Fur Recording in San Francisco was used for the mixing. Sterling Sound in New York City was responsible for the mastering. Except for “Baba Drame,” which was released by Labei Bleu (SACEM); “Procissao,” which was published by BMG Arabella (BMI); and “Perritos,” which was published by Tucuma Publishing, all of the compositions were written by Friz-Tone Music/BMI (BMI). Nonesuch Records, a Warner Music Group company, is listed at the bottom of the slipcase.

is responsible for the globe outside of the United States, while Nonesuch Records is responsible for the United States.

  • Barcode(Text):0 -7559-79661-2 1
  • Barcode(Scanning):075597966121
  • Label Code:LC 00286
  • Matrix / Runout(Variant 1):Warner Logo 755979661-2 03/03 V01
  • Mastering SID Code(Variant 1):IFPI L011
  • Mould SID Code(Variant 1):IFPI 05P1
  • Matrix / Runout(

Nonesuch Records The Intercontinentals

In this album by renowned guitarist, composer, and bandleader Bill Frisell, the Intercontinentals make their recording debut. Frisell created The Intercontinentals in 2001, and the group had its live performance debut at Seattle’s Earshot Jazz Festival the following fall. In addition to the original band members—Brazilian composer, singer, guitarist, and percussionist Vinicius Cantuária; Greek-Macedonian musician Christos Govetas on oud, bouzouki, and vocals; and Mali’s Sidiki Camara on percussion and vocals—the recording also includes newly added musicians Greg Leisz on pedal steel and various slide guitars, as well as violinist Jenny Scheinman.

As defined by DownBeatas, the resulting sound possesses “fine webs of guitar interlacing,” “swaying velocity,” “rich textures,” and “rhythmic urgency,” among other characteristics.

“With this trio, I’ve been discovering all kinds of new musical connections,” Frisell has stated in regards to this partnership.

Apart from his ongoing performance and collaborative recording activities, Frisell was honored at London’s Barbican Theatre not long before the release of the album with An Evening with Bill Frisell, in which he performed with The Intercontinentals, the newly formed Bill Frisell Sextet featuring Leisz, Ron Miles, Tony Scherr, Kenny Wolleson, and special guests Djelimady Tounkara, the celebrated Mali guitarist, and Eliza Carthy, the young singer and

Credits

MUSICIANS In addition to electric guitar (1-7, 9, 10, 12-14), acoustic guitar (5, 7), nylon string guitar (8, 11), baritone guitar (4), bass (13), loop (1, 3, 5-7, 9, 12, 13), Christos Govetas provides vocals (7-9), oud (1, 3, 5-7, 9, 12, 13), bouzouki (1, 3, 5-7, 9, 12, 13), bouzouki (1, 3, 5-7, 9, 12, 13), oud (1, 3, (4) Greg Leisz is a writer and director who lives in New York City. Asher lap steel (numbers 1, 4, and 12), pedal steel guitar (numbers 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 11, and 14), National lap steel (number 7), Scheerhorn resonator guitar (number 13), and loop pedal (1, 3, 5,12) The band includes Vinicius Cantuaria on voice (1, 7, 9, 11, 13), electric guitar (5, 7, 9, 11), nylon string guitar (2), snare drum (1, 3, 12, 13), bass drum (1, 3, 12, 13), triangle (2), and Sidiki Camara on vocals (4, 12), calabash (1-5, 7, 9-13), shaker (1-5, 7, 9-13), cymbals (1-5, 7, 9-13), djembe (2, 4, 7, 9, 10, 12), con (7) CREDIT FOR PRODUCTION Lee Townsend was in charge of the production.

Tucker Martine worked as a recording and mixing engineer.

Different Fur Recording in San Francisco was used for the mixing.

Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound in New York City was in charge of mastering.

Doyle Partners was responsible for the design. Audio-Visual Equipment Photographs courtesy of Tom Schierlitz

Bill Frisell: The Intercontinentals album review @ All About Jazz

BY Sign in to see the total number of times this article has been read. It’s past time to own up to a prejudice. Anyone who does a good job of covering Boubacar Traoré instantly earns my respect. Despite the fact that the Malian guitarist is incomprehensibly remote from anybody outside of Mali, it is not for any legitimate cause other than the whims of the music industry. Due to The Intercontinentals’ foreign flavor, the omnipresence of Malian drummer Sidiki Camara, and the way blues from Mali creates feeling and depth from basic cyclical arrangements, it’s only right that guitarist Bill Frisell would chose “Boubacar” as the album’s opening track.

  1. I believe they’ve done some research on Boubacar.
  2. A few remarks about the musicians and musical styles included on this album.
  3. That is the most distinguishing element of The Intercontinentals, as well as the characteristic that gives it its power.
  4. Furthermore, the fact that everyone plays either strings or percussion adds a distinct flavor to the overall sound of the ensemble.
  5. To be completely honest, that has been a disheartening tendency, since it has confined him and taken away much of the vibrancy and personality from his music.
  6. In spite of the fact that the country element is never absent from the music (Greg Leisz’s lap and pedal steel are enough to build a building), the music receives a much-needed infusion from a variety of sources.
  7. “Listen” and “Good Old People” both have a pleasant, comfortable inclination to bring things to a close quickly.
  8. Prociss’o’s anticipatory funk is accompanied by synchronized Brazilian voices and a down-home bluegrass swagger, and it’s a blast.
  9. Frisell’s nylon string guitar is the only instrument on the album.

I’d like Frisell to abandon his Americana preoccupation in favor of something a bit more fascinating, and this recording is unquestionably a giant step in the right direction. Please keep in mind that this album is one of the top 10 current jazz guitarpicks.

Track Listing

Boubacar, Good Old People, For Christos, Baba Drame, Listen, Anywhere Road, Procissao, The Young Monk, We Are Everywhere, Yala, Perritos, Magic, Eli, and Remember are some of the songs on this album.

Personnel

Bill Frisell plays electric and acoustic guitars, as well as looping and bass. Sidiki Camara (calabash, djembe, congas, percussion, vocals) performs on a variety of instruments. Vinicius Cantuaria performs with electric and acoustic guitars, vocals, drums, and percussion. Christos Govetas-oud performs on vocals and bouzouki. Jenny Scheinman plays violin, while Greg Leisz plays slide guitars and pedal steel guitar.

Album information

The Intercontinentals was released in 2003 by Nonesuch Records under the title “The Intercontinentals.”

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Since the release ofNashvillein 1997, Bill Frisell has been actively – some would say obsessively – investigating the depths and intricacies of American roots music on his many recordings. All of his later records, including Ghost Town, Gone Just Like a Train, Blues Dream, Good Dog, Happy Man, and The Willies, represented different interpretations of popular music from the United States: country, blues, bluegrass, field hollers, jazz and other forms, among others. He has been effective in blending, extracting, adapting, and otherwise morphing one piece of music onto another using his unique method to guitar playing – the song – which he has developed over the years.

Throughout The Intercontinentals, Frisell continues his exploration of American music, but this time as a means of understanding how it intertwines with the folk musics of several other countries.

Two years prior, Frisell had performed with Camara and Malian uber-guitaristBoubacar Traorea and was fascinated enough to investigate the relationship further.

It finds him and Cantuaria delving into the modern Malian guitar and percussion sound pioneered by Ali Farka Toure; blending that sound with the timeless emotional resonance of Greek folk songs through Govetas’ oud and infectious Brazilian lyricism; and filtering it through shimmering country landscapes and otherworldly string textures that reinvent harmonic properties to suit the lyric of the blues and song, indigenous folk musics, and the contemporary improvisational ideal.

Among the musicians that contributed to this album areGilberto Gil, Traore, Govetas and Cantuaria, who all played on Frisell’s compositions in some capacity.

That everything else in the mix fanned out and produces frequently contrapuntal backgrounds for graceful and lush, albeit thick, textures is what I find most intriguing, whether in the vocal tracks or in those where the Malian blues sound is the dominant force, is what I find most fascinating.

Because his sense of “song” is so prevalent, everything in this space is designed to complement its “singing.” His own tone, as well as that of Leisz and Cantuaria, is identifiable.

Even though each song stands alone as a harmonic and lyrical entity, with adventurous improvisation added in the spirit of true exploration, as an album they are bound together by the weave of aural tapestry, dynamics, and spaciousness that is so central to Frisell’s sound.

Though more collaborative than anything he’s done in the last decade, it nevertheless carries his signature in terms of sound and aesthetic.

A wonderful album, it establishes a new standard for Frisell’s sense of adventure and taste, as well as demonstrating his vision of beauty in a clear, uncompromising manner that is nonetheless very approachable. The music selection is shown with a blue accent.

Bill Frisell: The Intercontinentals, PopMatters

Almost twenty years after the publication ofNashville, Bill Frisell continues to actively – some would say obsessively – investigate the depths and intricacies of American roots music. All of his later records, including Ghost Town, Gone Just Like a Train, Blues Dream, Good Dog, Happy Man, and The Willies, represented different interpretations of popular music from the United States: country, blues, bluegrass, field hollers, jazz and other types of folk music. Using his unique method of guitar playing – the song – he has been effective at blending, extracting, adapting, and otherwise morphing one piece of music into another.

Frisell continues his research of American music on The Intercontinentals, but this time as a means of understanding how it intertwines with the folk musics of other countries.

Two years prior, Frisell had performed with Camara and Malian uber-guitaristBoubacar Traore and was fascinated enough to investigate the relationship further.

It finds him and Cantuaria delving into the modern Malian guitar and percussion sound pioneered by Ali Farka Toure; blending that sound with the timeless emotional resonance of Greek folk songs via Govetas’ oud and infectious Brazilian lyricism; and filtering it through shimmering country landscapes and otherworldly string textures that reinvent harmonic properties to suit the lyric of the blues and song, indigenous folk musics, and the contemporary improvisational ideal Among others who have contributed to this album areGilberto Gil, Traore, Govetas and Cantuaria, who each have a track or two to share with Frisell.

Scheinman’s violin serves as a beautiful landmark for virtually all of these musicians to return to; her melodic sensibility and crisp tone serve as beacons in the often swirling, escalating, and/or cascading whorls of plucked strings, playing as many as four melodies at the same time with winding, almost knotty scalar exchanges.

For want of a better phrase, this is the busiest record Frisell has produced in years, although it doesn’t feel like it.

As separate as the oud and violin are, the guitars are carried into the next area by hand drums, which are themselves distinct from the oud and violin.

And if this is possibly his most collaborative work in a decade, it nevertheless carries his sonic and artistic signature.

A wonderful album, it establishes a new standard for Frisell’s sense of adventure and taste, as well as demonstrating his vision of beauty in a clear, uncompromising manner that is nonetheless entirely approachable. It is indicated by a blue accent.

Bill Frisell : Intercontinentals (CD)

CD (Compact Disc) (Item 494758) Nonesuch (2003, 2003) — Used – Out of Stock Condition: Used – Out of Stock One further wide attempt by Bill Frisell, on which he incorporates new sounds from several different traditions into his new American pastoral framework, this time focusing on the blues. His coloristic tone and melodic sensibility are well-rooted here, as they have been on his other recent recordings, but they are cast in a new context with a new group that includes Brazilian guitarist Vinicius Cantuaria, Greek musician Christos Govetas on other stringed instruments, and Malian Sidiki Camara on percussion, as well as Greg Leisz, who has collaborated with Frisell on a number of other recordings and who adds some wonderful atmosphere, and violinist There are 14 tracks in all, including songs such as “Boubacar,” “Good Old People,” “Baba Drame,” “Procissao,” “We Are Everywhere,” and “Eli” among the highlights.

Dusty Groove, Inc.

(This book is no longer in print.) (There is no slipcover supplied.)

Additional MarksNotes

If we see something interesting, we attempt to make a note of it in the comments section – especially if it is an anomaly that is the only thing that is wrong with the recording. In this category include warped records, tracks that skip, cover damage and wear (as described above), and faults that are solely aesthetic in nature, among other things.

Used CD Grade

When it comes to non-new CDs, there is just one rating at Dusty Groove: “Used CD.” This grade is pretty all-encompassing, but we chose it because we want to provide Used CDs in the finest condition that we are able to give. When you purchase a Used CD, you can expect the disc to be free of all but the lightest of surface scratches, the case to be clean (we often replace the cases ourselves), and the booklet to be in good condition. Buying a New CD is a smart way to save money. Used CDs may have some indications of wear, but if there are any important details or faults, we will indicate them beneath the item — just as we do with LPs — so keep an eye out for remarks on cutout marks, stickers, promo stamps, or other information in that section.

In the case of a Used CD purchased from Dusty Groove, you have one week to test it to ensure that it functions properly — and if it does not, you may return it for a full refund.

You might be interested

Elektra,1990. Bill Frisell performed on guitar, bass, banjo, ukulele, and clarinet, with Wayne Horvitz providing keyboards, drum programming, and bass, and Dave Hofstra providing tuba and bass, among other instrumentations. Nonesuch,2000. Used Bill Frisell is a multi-instrumentalist who performs on electric guitar, acoustic guitar, banjo, loops, and bass. Elektra,1990/1991. Bill Frisell on guitars and ukulele, Hank Roberts on cello and jazz-a-phone violin, Kermit Driscoll on bass, and Joey Baron on drums were among the musicians who contributed to the album.

  1. Bill Frisell plays guitar, Don Byron plays clarinet, Guy Klucevsek plays accordion, Kermit Driscoll plays bass, and Joey Baron plays drums on the album Used.
  2. In addition to Bill Frisell on guitar and loops, Ry Cooder also performs on electric guitar, Greg Leisz on pedal steel guitar, lap steel guitar, Weissenborn and National guitars, and mandolin.
  3. Nonesuch,2001.
  4. Nonesuch,2005.

In the live set on CD1, Bill Frisell is joined by Viktor Krauss on bass and Kenny Wollesen on drums; in the live set on CD2, Frisell is joined by Tony Scherr, who is joined by Wollesen on drums and percussion, and Viktor Krauss on bass and acoustic guitar, as well as Wollesen on drums and percussion.

Jenny Scheinman on violin, Eyvind Kang on viola, and Hank Roberts on cello are among the 858 strings on this recording.

Used As a fitting tribute to the genius of Ennio Morricone, Zorn collaborated with a group of downtown New York hipsters to create this ground-breaking CD.

Nonesuch,2006.

Elektra/Nonesuch, late tenties/1920s/early thirties era.

Elektra/Nonesuch,1992. The songs “Havanola (Have Another)”, “Singin’ The Blues (Till My Daddy Comes Home),” “From Now On,” “Jaz-O-Mine,” “Just Snap Your Fingers At Care,” “Whip-Poor-Will,” “Rialto Ripples,” “Waitin’ For Me,” and “Buz” are included.

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