City Dharma: Keeping Your Cool in the Chaos by Arthur Jeon

City Dharma: Keeping Your Cool in the Chaos: Jeon, Arthur: 9781400049080: Amazon.com: Books

In an atmosphere that encourages imbalance, comparison, and competition, how can you retain a sense of equilibrium? In this friendly and engaging spiritual guide for urban residents, yoga instructor Jeon provides readers a dharma, or method, to cope with the clamor, stress, and fast speed of modern life. He looks at the components of our life that bring us the greatest stress, such as contacts with individuals who are nasty because of habitual hustling, the trap of “keeping up with the Joneses,” the monotony of our work and/or love relationships, and violence in our culture, among other things.

We should not be looking externally to spiritual leaders, but rather open ourselves to what is happening right now, being awake and in the present, as Jeon urges.

While Americans may have larger homes than their European counterparts, the stress of earning more money, he claims, ultimately reduces our life expectancy and negatively impacts our relationships with others.

Despite the fact that it was intended for city dwellers and high-powered suburbanites, this book should be enjoyed by everyone living everywhere.

Reed Business Information, a part of Reed Elsevier Inc., is the owner of the copyright.

FromBooklist

Is your evening commute a living nightmare? Do you have a case of SUV enviousy? Are you getting the heebie-jeebies when you read the news? You should be concerned if you responded yes to any of these questions since it is conceivable that your dharma has been severely disrupted. Dharma is an Eastern notion that refers to the embodiment of one’s fundamental view on and approach to life, which can range from the insignificant to the massive, from the personal to the universal. No matter where you go, there are possible perils to inner tranquility to be found, whether it’s the omnipresent chirping of cell phones or the unctuous posturing of coworkers.

Jeon develops a calming technique for reevaluating our internal responses to external stimuli such as road rage, status seeking, and other disturbing behaviors, drawing on painful experience and years of personal effort.

Carol Haggas is a writer and actress who lives in Los Angeles. The American Library Association owns the copyright. All intellectual property rights are retained.

City Dharma: Keeping Your Cool in the Chaos: Jeon, Arthur: 9781400049097: Amazon.com: Books

‘This funny, intelligent, and anecdote-filled assessment of the pitfalls and opportunities of following one’s spiritual path is an amusing and instructive read,’ says the author. Yoga Journal is a publication dedicated to the practice of yoga. “A fresh voice for the dharma in the city that is hip, clever, urban, and hilarious,” says the New York Times. Catherine Ingram, author ofPassionate Presence, says it best: “A guide to reflection to help you get through the metropolitan elements that wreak havoc on your spirit,” says the author.

“Clear-eyed, sympathetic, and witty in her delivery, Jeon’s approach offers efficient strategies for reducing that bothersome voice in your brain from a shriek to a whisper.” — From the Booklist ‘This topical work is extremely pertinent to our present worries in the here and now, as well as to our relationship with the eternal truths,’ says the author.

From the Inside Flap

A focused and serene existence in the calm isolation of an ashram or monastery is one thing; but what about the reality of most people’s lives, which is in a noisy city or bustling suburb, continuously blasted with the world’s most upsetting news? City Dharma is a hip, informative, and amusing book that teaches you how to maintain your composure even when your path to enlightenment takes you right through downtown during rush hour. This type of inconsiderate or aggressive conduct can cause our blood pressure to rise and our peace to evaporate whether we’re stuck in traffic, packed onto a crowded subway car, or elbowed aside on a congested city street.

According to Arthur Jeon’s book City Dharma, it is not what occurs to us, but how we react to events and ideas that is the source of the majority of our suffering.

The most troublesome parts of modern urban and suburban living are explored in detail by Jeon, who provides sensible, practical solutions to daily tensions and the erratic behavior of our own thoughts.

Working Stiffness Should Be Avoided When You’re Walking Down a Dark Alley Violence as a result of being aware The Dharma of the City and Sex The difference between seeking love and expressing love We’re Scaring the Living Hell out of Ourselves Transcending the Limits of Media Negativity Rage on the Highway Dealing with Mad Max both within and outside of one’s own body Incorporating wisdom from the ancient Eastern teachings of Advaita Vedanta and richly illustrated with compelling stories, City Dharma proposes a new way of seeing the world-one that is based on connection rather than separation, direct experience rather than belief, and love rather than fear-a way of seeing the world that is based on connection rather than separation.

This is taken from the Hardcover edition.

City Dharma

Open the Preview window

See a Problem?

We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. Please tell us what is wrong with this preview of City Dharmaby Arthur Jeon. Thank you for your feedback. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. · 123 ratings 21 reviews 123 ratings Begin your review of City Dharma: Maintaining Your Calm in the Face of Chaos. 26th of June, 2017 Fate’s Ladyrated it, and she did not approve of it. Everything about the whole white guru thing made me feel uneasy very immediately, particularly the fact that all of the professors he acknowledges personally studying from are named after people from Western countries.

  • While in South Africa, he recounts seeing appalling bigotry (complete with insults, which he prints in full multiple times), and he pats himself on the back for having sympathy for the racist with whom he’s hanging out.
  • Although the theory presented in this book was watered down, it was also full with white male arrogance, which was something I had expected.
  • He makes it very clear that he will never speak out or take any action in response to racial threats, even when it appears that the situation may develop into violence.
  • As an example, back in the United States, when he unintentionally touches a tense individual, despite the fact that he is SO enlightened, and then calls the individual “demented” behind his back when someone else calms him down.
  • DNF.more 12th of August, 2017 Chris gave it a high rating and said he enjoyed it.
  • It was excellent.
  • It’s not ideal – I thought it was a little long-winded at times, and some of his examples seemed a little forced – but it served its purpose well as an introduction to a dharma perspective on life.

We’d had this book on our bookshelf for a long time, perhaps since it was first released, and I finally got around to reading it.

I’m happy I did since I truly enjoyed it.

My thoughts on it have stayed with me for quite some time, and I want to read and learn more in the same line in the future.

It is recommended for: Buddhists, urbanites of all stripes, and everyone else.

This book provides excellent guidance on how to remain aware and compassionate while living in a metropolitan setting.

It’s fantastic!

BOO!

I really want to give it a negative star, if that’s okay with you.

See also:  Mantra 101

It’s far too fluffy.

Blah.

Is this a blatant violation of Buddhist principles?

This book provided me with almost nothing of value.

I also thought it was a little too judgemental, especially towards the conclusion, and a little too self-righteous in its tone.

There were two fingers’ worth of advise at the beginning of the book, and the rest of the book was a complete waste of time and effort.

To be clear, it is not Buddhist, despite what the author continues trying to convince you to think.

I had high expectations for this book, but was disappointed to find that it delivered almost nothing.

To be honest, Arthur Jeon is a fantastic author, and his books City Dharma and Sex, Love, and Dharma haven’t received nearly enough notice in the mainstream.

Despite the fact that there is nothing particularly profound or insightful in this book, I believe it would be an interesting read for anybody who practices meditation or spirituality in an urban context, as I do.

The tone of the text is quite warm and comforting.

Despite the fact that there is nothing particularly profound or insightful in this book, I believe it would be an interesting read for anybody who practices meditation or spirituality in an urban context, as I do.

The tone of the text is quite warm and comforting.

This book contains some interesting portions and valuable information if you can get over the vagueness of the introduction.

Answers that will make you think about how to survive in a society that is practically by definition psychologically crazy.

It’s perhaps the only self-help book in years that wasn’t making money by giving away “free counsel” to those who needed it.

Without guru-izing or preaching, Jeon utilizes examples from his own life to show a variety of categories of modern angst—work, sex, traffic, beggars, and many more—as well as how to deal with your own personal fears in the middle of these situations.

Jeon acknowledges the existence of individual consciousness experiences and does not condemn them; rather, he identifies paths toward a mindful living in a world that appears to be growing more devoid of conscience and compassion on a daily basis.

The 25th of May, 2011 It was incredible, as Sararated it.

Excellent depiction of how to apply the dharma to one’s daily life in a metropolitan setting.

Besides that, everything else was right on, hilarious, and very realistic.

Excellent depiction of how to apply the dharma to one’s daily life in a metropolitan setting.

Everything else was perfect, humorous, and very relatable.

It was just fantastic.

For the foreseeable future, this book will remain on my bookshelf, and I anticipate returning to it at some point in the future to give it a thorough review.

This book will remain on my bookshelf for many years to come, and I’m sure I’ll return to it at some time to give it a proper review.

Please don’t be put off by the name of the organization.

Anyone who can identify to the effort of preserving tranquility while going about one’s daily business would profit from the reading of this novel.

It is not necessary to be a Buddhist practitioner in order to benefit from this.

The 17th of September, 2008 Lizrated it and thought it was excellent.

If you are following the new earth rules, this book would be a terrific resource for you since it provides a very realistic depiction of how to deal with quieting the mind and living in the present while living in a city with all of the city’s trappings.

This book would be excellent for anyone who is following the new earth rules since it provides a fantastic realistic depiction of how to handle quieting the mind and living in the present while living in a city with all of the city’s responsibilities.

This was an excellent read for me.

Perhaps you must have been born and reared in chaos in order to appreciate it.

This was an excellent read for me.

Perhaps you must have been born and reared in chaos in order to appreciate it.

I’m a little stressed out because of the building site next door.

It’s one rung above blah in terms of content, and completely blah in terms of writing style.

Because the building site next door was making me a little agitated, I picked up these pieces of wisdom to help me cope with the stress of city life and dealing with ‘other people.’ Now I’m feeling a little more optimistic.

Another slog.more of the same The 29th of February, 2016 Jane gave it a high rating and said she enjoyed it.

Anyone who want to change their life from inside will find this book to be quite beneficial.

This was quite beneficial to me while I was relocating from the middle of the United States.

Arthur Jeon holds a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities from Harvard University as well as an MFA in screenwriting from the University of Southern California.

and producer Joel Silver was among the several that he sold while working in Hollywood.

In addition, he is a feature Arthur Jeon holds a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities from Harvard University as well as an MFA in screenwriting from the University of Southern California.

and producer Joel Silver was among the several that he sold while working in Hollywood.

A collection of articles titled “Right Here, Right Now: Bringing Mindful Awareness Into Our Lives,” which includes contributions from other spiritual giants, is also dedicated to him.

This animal welfare work exposed him to the alarming rates of habitat loss and extinction that sparked the concept for Snowflake, his debut novel about a high school kid who resolves to assassinate the president as a means of protecting the environment.

In his most recent novel, The. Thank you for returning. For the moment, please wait while we sign you in to YourGoodreading Account.

City Dharma

A focused and serene existence in the calm isolation of an ashram or monastery is one thing; but what about the reality of most people’s lives, which is in a noisy city or bustling suburb, continuously blasted with the world’s most upsetting news? City Dharma is a hip, informative, and amusing book that teaches you how to maintain your composure even when your path to enlightenment takes you right through downtown during rush hour. This type of inconsiderate or aggressive conduct can cause our blood pressure to rise and our peace to evaporate whether we’re stuck in traffic, packed onto a crowded subway car, or elbowed aside on a congested city street.

According to Arthur Jeon’s book City Dharma, it is not what occurs to us, but how we react to events and ideas that is the source of the majority of our suffering.

The most troublesome parts of modern urban and suburban living are explored in detail by Jeon, who provides sensible, practical solutions to daily tensions and the erratic behavior of our own thoughts.

Working Stiffness Should Be Avoided When You’re Walking Down a Dark Alley Violence as a result of being aware The Dharma of the City and Sex The difference between seeking love and expressing love We’re Scaring the Living Hell out of Ourselves Transcending the Limits of Media Negativity Rage on the Highway Having to deal with Mad Max Both from within and beyond Incorporating wisdom from the ancient Eastern teachings of Advaita Vedanta and richly illustrated with compelling stories, City Dharma proposes a new way of seeing the world-one that is based on connection rather than separation, direct experience rather than belief, and love rather than fear-a way of seeing the world that is based on connection rather than separation.

See also:  Q&A: Chelsea Jackson on Diversity

This is taken from the Hardcover edition.

City Dharma : Keeping Your Cool in the Chaos by Arthur Jeon 9781400049080

Shipping to: Anywhere in the world Included are the following countries: Mauritius, the Russian Federation, Albania, Andorra, Belarus, the Bosnia and Herzegovina of Bulgaria, Cyprus, the European Union, Gibraltar, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man, the Isle of Man and the Isle of Man and the Isle

9781400049080: City Dharma: Keeping Your Cool in the Chaos – AbeBooks

IN addition to leading weekly discussions known as Dharma Conversations and teaching yoga in Santa Monica, California, ARTHUR JEON is a Buddhist monk. Visit his website at citydharma.com for more information. Excerpt. Permission has been granted to reprint. All intellectual property rights are reserved.: “HELL IS OTHER PEOPLE,” says the author. Was Jean-Paul Sartre completely correct? To fix the crooked, you must first accomplish a much difficult task: you must first straighten yourself. -BUDDHA According to a cartoon published in The New Yorker, a lady is walking down a Manhattan street when she says to a friend, “It’s hard, but slowly I’m going back to hating everyone.” She is referring to the changing mood in New York following the September 11 attacks.

  1. There are so many spiritual teachings and publications that gloss over the fact that individuals may be challenging.
  2. And, as global history has often demonstrated, many millions of people are being taught to live under conditions of tyranny, cruelty, and hardship.
  3. My primary motivation for creating this book is to be of service to others in the same manner that the teachings of the Dharma have been of use to me.
  4. This is true whether the battle is between nations or between the two persons who are fighting in the flat across the hall from where they live.
  5. We believe that other people are the root of our unhappiness and “hell,” and that they are to blame.
  6. From rudeness to murder, it appears as though everything bad is coming from somewhere else.
  7. Cut us off in traffic, sleep with our wives, deny us the promotions we deserve, lie, steal, and cheat—they all contribute to the creation of hell on Earth in many ways, both large and tiny.

There are horrible things that happen, bad people who act poorly, and the world is a flawed place.

However, our perception, training, and association with the thoughts surrounding the incident cause us to suffer indefinitely after that.

In other words, horrible things happen to good people, but the majority of the suffering occurs afterward, in the netherworld of our own imaginations, as we relive the occurrence over and over again, unable to go on.

My typical response is something along the lines of “I should have known better.” Instead of feeling sympathy for myself, I was filled with self-loathing and self-hatred.

It’s possible that someone picked the lock, or that something else happened.

Based on our own programming, we will all react in a unique way to the situation.

When I say identified, I’m referring to how connected we are to our beliefs and how much we believe those thoughts determine who we are.

So, why do we trust these notions and give them such authority over our lives?

Taking the natural world as an example, researchers have recently discovered a gene called 5-HTT that determines why some people react to stressful events such as death, abuse, or job loss by falling into deep depression or paralyzing anxiety, while others are only mildly affected by the same events.

  • This is a person’s nature, which is made up of our own inherited characteristics as well as our biological reality.
  • In the case of a negative childhood experience such as your father telling you, “You’re stupid,” or your mother being too impatient with anything you did, that negativity gets imprinted in you.
  • These are the events that form our nurturing, which may be either unpleasant or positive, or a combination of the two, and which lasts for the rest of our lives.
  • The only way to diminish the horror of the outer world is not to convince other people to change, but rather to lessen the anguish that exists within ourselves and our own hearts.
  • By not identifying with your internal story, judgments, and belief systems as they occur in the form of thinking, you are able to get free of your conditioned response in certain ways.
  • However, even though reactivity may occur, you do not hold on to it; rather, you release it as soon as you notice the conditioned reaction that has occurred.
  • Simply said, you don’t believe the ideas to be genuine, and you don’t project them out into the outside world either.

You have a great deal more internal freedom, and you minimize your own suffering as well as the agony of everyone else around you.

What is the response to the age-old question, “Who am I?” when we ask ourselves this question?

What are our beliefs?

What about our families?

The majority of people would answer yes.

This is one of the fundamental questions explored in this book.

There is no such thing as a little self, no such thing as a little “me, me, me” of conditioned personality, which is imprisoned by our affiliation with and attachment to people, situations, and material belongings.

What is the truth of our being if not the small self with its constant striving, filled with desires and fears, thinking constantly about acquiring and then protecting what we have acquired?

We’ll get to it eventually. But first and foremost, we must take a long, hard look at who we have been taught to be and why. The section titled “About this title” may refer to a different edition of this title.

keeping your cool in the chaos (eBook, 2004) [WorldCat.org]

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Arthur Jeon
OCLC Number: 1035682173
Description: 1 online resource (x, 387 pages: illustrations)
Contents: “Hell is other people”: was Jean-Paul Sartre right? -Road rage: dealing with Mad Max within and without -Turn it down: noise versus sound -Keeping up with the Joneses: awaken from status envy -Walking down a dark alley: awareness and violence -Moving en masse: public transportation -“Spare some change?”: the “smelly bum” on the corner -“Me, me, me. What about me?”: urban rudeness and narcissism -Scaring ourselves to death: transcending media negativity -Another day, another dollar: avoid working stiffness -Sex and the city dharma: seeking love vs. expressing love -The end: death and belief and fairy tales.
Responsibility: Arthur Jeon.
More information:
  • A sample text
  • A table of contents
  • Contributor personal information
  • A description of the publisher
  • An openlibrary.org link

Abstract:

A focused and serene existence in the calm isolation of an ashram or monastery is one thing; but what about the reality of most people’s lives, which is in a noisy city or bustling suburb, continuously blasted with the world’s most upsetting news? According to author Jeon, the majority of our misery is not caused by what occurs to us, but rather by how we respond to events and ideas. He shows you how to retain your calm even when the path to enlightenment takes you straight through downtown during rush hour, by providing practical solutions to handle daily tensions and the crazy-making reaction of our own brains.

-Extracted from the publisher’s description

City Dharma : Keeping Your Cool in the Chaos by Arthur Jeon

ISBN 978-1400049097Actions:Add to BookbagSell This BookAdd to Wish ListSet Price AlertShip To:arrives within.More Settings »

Paperback,400Pages, Published2005

ISBN-10: 1-4000-4909-1/ 1400049091ISBN-13:978-1-4000-4909-7/ 9781400049097
All of the men had guns, and Maja and David were shoved into seats at a smalltable in the kitchen.more »
from€41.90 from€15.01 not available not available
Store Condition Price + Fees = Total
AbeBooks.de MarketplaceBest Value!ratings @ 100% positiveships from United Statesstore language is German Very Good €5.40 + 9.61 = €15.01 Buy it
“May have limitedwritingin cover pages. Pages are unmarked. ~ ThriftBooks: Read More, Spend Less “- thriftbooksatlanta @ Georgia, United States
AbeBooks.de Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United Statesstore language is German Good €5.40 + 9.61 = €15.01 Buy it
Alibris.co.uk Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United States Used £6.75 + 5.71 €15.18 Buy it
Alibris.co.uk Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United States Acceptable £6.75 + 5.71 €15.18 Buy it
Alibris.co.uk Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United States Very Good £6.78 + 5.71 €15.21 Buy it
Alibris.co.uk Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United States Good £6.78 + 5.71 €15.21 Buy it
AbeBooks.de Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United Statesstore language is German Used €9.84 + 8.54 = €18.38 Buy it
Login to see store detailsships from Finlandstore language is Finnish New €31.95 + 9.95 = €41.90 Login to see
Alibris Marketplaceratings @ 80% positiveships from United States Good US$53.68 + 14.99 €61.78 Buy it
AbeBooks.de Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United Statesstore language is German Acceptable €1.76 + 65.59 = €67.35 Buy it
AbeBooks.de Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United Statesstore language is German New €57.43 + 17.49 = €74.92 Buy it
AbeBooks.de Marketplaceratings @ 100% positiveships from United Statesstore language is German New €40.52 + 43.71 = €84.23 Buy it
Alibris Marketplaceratings @ 80% positiveships from United States New US$113.34 + 14.99 €115.45 Buy it
show 49 more copies
We may earn a commission when you use some of the links above to make a purchase.
International currency rates last updated: 2/4/2022(conversions include estimated 3% transaction fee)1 GBP = 1.18243 EUR1 USD = 0.87343 EUR

Arthur Jeon

Representation by an Agent Occurs Signings Film Rights Publication in a Foreign Country Coverage in the media and networking Spencer Compton is a published author in the United States.

Agent

Representation by an Agent Occurs. Affiliations Film Rights Publication Abroad Networking and Media Coverage American author Spencer Compton has a book out in the United States.

THRILLERS

In Jeon’s YA thriller, a disturbed adolescent embarks on an audacious plot to avert climate catastrophe from occurring. Ben Wallace, a young man of eighteen, recalls everything he has ever done or read in his life. It may appear to be a superpower, but in reality, it is a curse, one that necessitates him seeing a therapist and cathartically recording his thoughts in a diary in order to deal with it. The stories about international events, though, are making him increasingly uneasy, and he is finding that these approaches aren’t working for him.

His high school friends appear to be more interested with selfies and social media than they are with environmental concerns, which is concerning.

The thought takes root in his mind and refuses to leave: in order to rescue the globe, he’ll have to murder the guy who is doing the greatest harm to it—the president of the United States, who denies climate change is a factor.

The educator must decide whether or not to intervene in Ben’s descent towards fanaticism.

Since the book is written as if it were Ben’s personal notebook, the narrator incorporates a fair amount of hyperbolic teenage petulance, such as: “Above us, the museum is squatted behind a burka of smoke, having been crapped on by a billion bucks and butchered.” He rants about “Fakebook” and “Insta-Lie,” as well as pornography, hunting, and other topics—to the point that when he finally takes action, the reader will be unable to help but feel a gloomy feeling of satisfaction, no matter how ill-advised it may be.

  1. Every piece of evidence points to an ending that appears engineered to elicit debate.
  2. The overwhelming feeling that readers will have after finishing this book is one of hopeless fatigue.
  3. Date of publication: May 20, 2020 ISBN:978-1-73409-350-6 412 pages are included in this book.
  4. Posted on the internet: October 19, 2020 Hometown Wilmington (Delaware) (I haven’t seen Joe Biden in three months, so I can’t claim to be acquainted with him.) F.
  5. favorite bookThe Great Gatsby (I know, it’s a cliche, but what can you do?
  6. What is your favorite word right now?
  7. Prescient!
  8. Finding the appropriate words to express one’s passion in life.
  9. Pick of the Editor’s A new novel takes aim at President Trump’s climate policies and the presidential election of 2020.

Interview with Arthur Jeon, published in Booktrib in 2020. Send2Press Release (Send2Press Release, 2020) Snowflake is named “Editor’s Choice” by Publishers Weekly for the year 2020.

ADDITIONAL WORKS AVAILABLE

Living in the tranquil isolation of an ashram or monastery is one thing; but, what about the reality of most people’s lives, which is in a noisy city or busy neighborhood, where they are continuously bombarded with the world’s most upsetting news? City Dharma is a hip, informative, and amusing book that teaches you how to maintain your composure even when your path to enlightenment takes you right through downtown during rush hour. This type of inconsiderate or aggressive conduct can cause our blood pressure to rise and our peace to evaporate whether we’re stuck in traffic, packed onto a crowded subway car, or elbowed aside on a congested city street.

According to Arthur Jeon’s book City Dharma, it is not what occurs to us, but how we react to events and ideas that is the source of the majority of our suffering.

Jeon explores the most challenging aspects of modern urban and suburban life, including: awareness and violence, transcending media negativity, and dealing with road rage both internally and externally.

Published on April 4, 2004ISBN: 1-4000-4908-3 (hardcover).

Sex, Love, and Dharma: Finding Love Without Losing Your Way

A better way to be in love is presented in Sex, Love, and Dharma, which applies the ancient wisdom of dharma to the joys, struggles, and heartbreaks of contemporary romance. This book will guide you through the process of finding the genuine love you’ve always dreamed was possible.

Please select an existing bookshelf

Author| Santa Monica, California, United States| Website Prior to becoming an author, Arthur Jeon was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood, selling numerous projects, including thrillers, to Warner Bros. Random House released two of his non-fiction books: City Dharma: Keeping Your Cool amid the Chaos andSex, LoveDharma: Finding Love Without Losing Your Way, all of which are available on Amazon. More specifically, both books employ mindfulness to the. Prior to becoming an author, Arthur Jeon was a successful screenwriter in Hollywood, selling numerous projects, including thrillers, to Warner Bros.

Both volumes explore the application of mindfulness to the demands of contemporary life.

He was exposed to the worrisome rates of habitat degradation and extinction while working in the animal welfare field, which sparked the concept for Snowflake, his debut novel.

Arthur holds a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities from Harvard Extension School and an MFA in screenwriting from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *