Interview with Tias Little: Practice and Balance

Interview with Tias Little: Precision in Motion

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. Tias Little is a former competitive soccer player, a philosophy student, and an anatomy enthusiast. He teaches in a unique approach that mixes Buddhist instruction with bodily awareness through perfect alignment, and he has received several awards. As an instructor all around the globe and at Prajna Yoga, the New Mexico retreat facility he co-founded with his wife, Surya Little (and their six-year-old son, Eno), he encourages students to go deeper into the practice’s inner depths.

I was a soccer player in college, and I began studying Iyengar Yoga, with the goal of utilizing it therapeutically to prevent injury while playing soccer.

What changes have you noticed in your practice?

I traveled to Mysore on two separate occasions to learn with K.

  • However, as a teacher, when I noticed that the students who came into my studio were unable to do the postures, I began to change them and move away from that method.
  • My practice has become much more focused, sensitive, and delicate as a result.
  • What led you to Buddhist meditation in the first place?
  • It was evident that practicing Warrior I was not going to be beneficial.
  • As a result, I began collaborating with Buddhist instructors, particularly those from the Tibetan Dzogchen school.
  • You have a distinctive teaching technique that incorporates both asana and anatomical training.
  • My PowerPoint presentation has more than 300 photos, and I always teach using a full-length skeleton and a sacrum model on the table.

I want students to be able to feel the teachings in their body, so that it is not only a theoretical exercise.

Yoga, I usually tell my students, is actually a kind of mental training, much more so than it is a form of physical training.

I inform them that is not the case.

Compared to her, I’m the circus’s ringmaster, in charge of the large ensemble performances.

The majority of students that come through our program work with her in private sessions.

She has a background in nutrition as well as therapeutic yoga. She’s the healing power, and I’m the one that brings it all together. We are both students of the same master, Tsoknyi Rimpoche, and we are both devoted to the same dharma, the same life’s work.

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Balancing Mind and Body with Tias Little

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Right Medicine

Participants in the internal arts of yoga or qi gong who practice on a regular basis see their practice as a medical treatment. Mindfulness and breathing practices are used to achieve this. click here to find out more

Is the Yoga Industry Changing?

The internal arts of yoga and qi gong are used as medicine by those who are frequent practitioners of these arts. Mindfulness techniques and breathing techniques are employed. see this page for further information

On the Rock

Anyone who considers rock climbing to be one of the most magnificent and terrifying physical accomplishments ever accomplished by a human being should read the article published on November 22, 2021. click here to find out more

Your Delicate, Blood Filled Lungs

Tias Little contributed to this article. I like to say that where there is breath, there is also blood, and this is true. When you take a breath, your lungs and heart work together to push blood through your system. click here to find out more

The Vulnerability of Afghani Women

Several days ago, CNN broadcast a report about the fall of the Afghan government and the swift takeover of the country by the Taliban. The newscaster was addressing the audience. click here to find out more

Q & A with Tias Little

Ali Modell contributed to this article. As part of this weekly feature, we ask Chicago-area teachers to conduct interviews with their colleagues about their heritage and the teacher-student connection. Yoga requires that you are connected to others as well as to your teachers. As the creator of Prajna Yoga in Santa Fe, New Mexico, you may benefit from the expertise of Tias Little on these topics. Having begun his yogic studies as a child, Little and his wife, Surya, pursued their studies in the Ashtanga yoga system as an adult couple, which they completed together.

  • As a practitioner, he continues to collaborate closely with his Zen and Sanskrit instructors, who continue to be an inspiration to him.
  • He has maintained his adherence to the Krishnamacharya tradition, which was founded by the fathers of the Ashtanga and Iyengar forms of yoga, which serve as the foundation for the majority of current schools of yoga.
  • Please tell us about how you got started on your yoga adventure.
  • I’ve been injured several times as a result of my years of athletic participation.
  • It was a great way to keep my body in shape.
  • Long before I received any official instruction, I used to regularly practice meditation outside in nature.
  • Little: Recently, I’ve devoted a significant amount of my time and energy to the study and practice of healing and meditative arts.

Somatics has also proven to be an excellent supplement to my regular yoga practice, because to its emphasis on body awareness and movement system.

I owe a debt of appreciation to all of the professors I’ve had throughout the years, as well as the insights I’ve received from working with them.

As a teacher, I am only one bead in a much larger string of bead strands.

It is essential for me to maintain a connection with tradition since it is this that provides strength and continuity to my work.

When it comes to Prajna Yoga, your yoga approach/school, and what Prajna is all about, how does your personal research inform your practice?

It implies that you understand something at its most fundamental level.

We are also influenced by the ancient teachings of the Buddha, particularly Zen and Vipassana meditation, which are particularly prevalent today.

As a result, we use an interdisciplinary approach, weaving together traditional yoga, Buddhist insight, and a thorough understanding of anatomy.

Little: In many ways, finding a medium ground between clinging to tradition while still being open to new ideas is like walking on a tightrope.

The teaching of Prajna Yoga is dynamic, ever-changing, and creative; it is intended to be relevant to today’s society and to be accessible to everybody.

In five years, I’m not sure where my work will be, but I’m confident that it will continue to grow.

What does the future hold for Prajna?

Prajna is founded on the recognition of the significance of tracking the subtlety of breath, feeling, thoughts, and perceptions in the present moment.

Everyone, whether they are a school teacher, a bus driver, a nurse, or a yoga instructor, may benefit from practicing mindfulness.

Little: I believe that having a teacher is quite beneficial.

Personally, I believe that having a one-on-one interaction is critical, such as in the psychotherapy approach, in which the client is guided through their own kleshas (or holding patterns) with the help of their coach or counselor is essential.

I find this to be a little difficult given the large number of pupils I am responsible for.

It is also beneficial to have a yoga teacher, since as one grows in experience and evolution on the yoga path, it is easy to slip back into old habits and lose sight of the need of maintaining a constant practice and internal growth.

Tell us about some of the distinctive characteristics of the Prajna temple, as well as how it contributes to student learning.

The importance of beauty for the human soul cannot be overstated.

Our temple has a Japanese influence, which can be seen in the courtyard gate, the round windows of the temple, and the landscaping across the property.

The practice delivers a very extraordinary experience for anyone who chooses to participate in it.

Little: When yoga becomes a goal-oriented practice, it becomes quite troublesome.

Many practitioners feel that the purpose of yoga is to acquire certain poses, but I believe that the goal is to recover from physical, psychological, and emotional pain.

It is beneficial to raise the question, “What is the common root of all beings?” in order to mend one’s split self.

One such aim is the health and survival of our planet, which is something that all creatures on the world must support and which must be connected to in it to be accomplished.

More information on Tias Little may be found at prajnayoga.net.

She is dedicated to the preservation of the art and science of yoga, and she is also studying to become a practitioner of East Asian Medicine, with a particular emphasis on integrative medicine and structural integration. More information about her art may be found at alimodell.com.

The Emotional Body: An Interview with Tias Little

The yoga teacher Tias Little, who is an expert in yoga as well as Eastern philosophy, bodywork, and anatomy, has become one of my regular teachers, with whom I attend his workshops whenever he is in the Chicago area and his teacher training classes when he is in his home base in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Tias has been teaching intensives in Naples, Florida, for the past few years at Studio 41, a great yoga studio that I frequent while I am in town visiting my husband’s parents. In order to coincide with Tias’s visit, I planned my yearly winter trip to Naples to take place on the same weekend as his visit.

  1. The interview took place on Lisa’s front porch, amid a beautiful cascade of lavender-blue trumpet vines, which Tias and I were lucky enough to stumble across.
  2. It was hard not to compare this to my last encounter with Tias, which took place in Chicago during the dreary, overcast days of November, when he was presenting an asana and anatomy intensive at Moksha Yoga Center.
  3. My inquiries were a follow-up to some of the ideas that Tias offered in his training about the relationship between our habitual physical patterns and the emotional body, which I found very interesting.
  4. There are five koshas, or sheaths, on the yogic path, each of which moves inward toward the Self in a gradual manner.
  5. What is the best way to go to this layer?

Tias Little (interviewer): My experience is that the majority of trainees begin by focusing on the annamayakosha, the physical sheath, and working their way through the muscular/skeletal system–first, by opening up the connective tissue of the body, and then gradually becoming more subtle over time.

  1. A large number of yoga students, particularly yoga instructors, find themselves slightly fasting and not eating enough as a result of the frantic nature of their schedules.
  2. TL: That’s correct.
  3. In contrast, I would suggest that there is an energy sheath just beneath the surface of the skin, which I believe contains the emotional body as well.
  4. LG: As a yoga teacher, what are some of the ways we tend to hold emotions in our bodies, as well as some common armoring patterns, that you see in your students?
  5. Over the course of my teaching career, I have witnessed many different sorts of tension–stress caused by weariness or exhaustion, tension resulting from athletics, tension resulting from a kind of fear, or tension resulting from various emotional states that become ingrained in the tissues.
  6. It is in charge of controlling the fight-or-flight response.
  7. Yoga gives us the ability to have some influence over our endocrine system, and one of the most rewarding goals to strive for in the practice is to be able to influence our hormonal firings.

LG: You highlighted this in your anatomy course at Moksha Yoga Center in November: that the body normally responds to emotional stimuli in three ways: fight, flight, and collapse.

Can you elaborate on your point?

However, it is.

This response occurs in people as well, and it can manifest itself in varying degrees of severity.

LG: What about folks who are unable to engage certain muscles?

The adrenal response of collapsing is not the most typical one.

For this type of bracing, the rear body serves as an excellent recipient.

What is the significance of the rear of the body?

We must remain in the current moment.

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People are exposed to dangers of all types from a very young age, including physical, emotional, and psychological threats, to which their bodily tissues respond on an unconscious level.

LG: Dehydrating.does that mean there is no liquidity or flow?

That is a phrase that I have always admired.

In terms of fight, it would be the bracing, holding-on kind of thing, whereas in terms of flight, it would be.

People who are non-confrontational and are seeking for the quickest way out of the situation.

This running-flight reaction, as opposed to the collapsing pattern, can cause significant stiffness, particularly in the legs, hamstrings, and buttocks, as compared to the collapsing pattern.

Because our feeling of survival and instinct are so intertwined with our adrenal glands, they are called the “survival hormones.” And I believe that our responses to dangers at such a young age get ingrained in our structure.

It is not something that comes to mind when we think about if it may be related to previous holding patterns.

TL: Some can begin as early as infancy as a result of the startle reaction, but I believe it is more common in elementary and middle school.

I believe that patterns may be established very early, whether in the preverbal or adolescent stages, which makes them much more difficult to go through in yoga practice.

This is the essence of who I am.

As a result, our core sense of self-identity is moulded by our surroundings, and I believe that the strained patterns will manifest themselves in a variety of forms.

a lack of support in the family dynamic, to be more specific.

As a result, depending on the source of the stress, different regions of the body would be impacted in different manners.

The thought crosses my mind: “Wow, if someone’s hips are so tight–why is that?” It might be due to their structural make-up, it could be partly related to their genetic make-up or cultural history, or it could be due to habitual holding patterns resulting from the fight, flight, or collapse reaction to a stressful situation.

  • Yes, it is possible that one’s attitude to the surroundings, as well as the kind of demands placed on them, is to blame.
  • TL: There are also girls that develop quite swiftly.
  • Slouching is highly frequent among teen females, especially if they are tall from a young age, and it is more prevalent among tall teen girls.
  • What did you intend to say with that?
  • Our legs are so important to our inner sense of self-identity because they enable us to stand on our own two feet.
  • They manifest themselves in the arms as well, because the arms are so strongly associated with receiving, nurturing, and being held by the mother.
  • The basic chakras are represented by the knees and feet.

A lot of pressure is placed on the feet, with the ankles and arches, as well as the big toe, hurting, compressing, and collapsing under the weight.

LG: What is the connection between them?

It is quite normal for people to retain tension in their extremities, particularly when they are afraid.

You should be aware that energy is not truly moving into and out of the body.

When it comes to energy blocks, how can we determine whether they are caused by an emotional issue, a physical trauma, or an anatomical limitation?

After all, you are well aware that any physical injury would be exacerbated by an emotional reaction.

For me, fatigue tension is distinct from other types of stress, such as worry tension, which is distinct from tension that results from skiing really hard.

LG: You mean, like putting up a front or tiptoeing around the topic, you know–avoiding the issue?

As a result, we become quite adept at burying or concealing anxiety.

It is quite beneficial to combine psychotherapy treatment with yoga therapy; that is, to not only have a thorough awareness of our emotional holding, but also to be aware of where it may be located in our bodies and to be able to deal with it in the asanas is extremely beneficial.

Or what about the length of time one spends in a position–is it beneficial to stay in a posture for a longer period of time?

As an example, when dealing with someone who has been abused as a kid, emotionally or sexually, it may be preferable to utilize passive, supported positions such as bridge pose on the bolster or supta baddha konasana, among other things.

Standing postures have the potential to be really beneficial.

LG: You’re saying that individuals have just re-established their grip?

As a side note, our neural systems are quite capable of doing this already–forming an armor layer upon another layer upon another.

TL: That’s right.

As a result, being larger is not always preferable.

That happiness, of course, is the most delightful sensation.

Recognizing their existence and, of course, cooperating with them LG: You are unlikely to experience true joy if you are ignoring your problems, since they will ultimately hold you back.

She has had considerable instruction in a variety of disciplines including ashtanga vinyasa yoga, Iyengar yoga, Buddhist philosophy, and bodywork.

Tias has a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s degree in Eastern philosophy, and he is a master of language.

Tias is a regular writer to Yoga Journal and Yoga International publications, and he and his wife, Surya Little, co-authored the book sthiram sukham asanam (which literally translates as a position in which one may remain stable, tranquil, and comfortable).

Intensives on psychosomatic yoga will be presented by Tias Little during the Yoga Journal Grand Geneva Conference, which will be held in Lake Geneva (Wisconsin) from May 13-15, 2005.

You may sign up for a membership at During the week of November 17-20, 2005, he will be teaching an asana workshop and an anatomy intensive at Moksha Yoga Center in Chicago. More information about Tias and his schedule may be found on the YogaSource Web site, which can be found at

Connect to the Subtle, with Tias Little

As an expert in yoga, Eastern philosophy, bodywork and anatomy, Tias Little has become one of the yoga teachers with whom I regularly study. I attend his workshops whenever he is in the Chicago area, as well as his teacher training classes in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he has set up a base of operations. Over the past few years, Tias has taught intensives in Naples, Florida, at Studio 41, a great yoga studio that I frequent while I’m in town visiting my husband’s parents’ home. In order to coincide with Tias’s visit, I planned my yearly winter excursion to Naples to take place the same weekend.

  1. I invited Tias and myself to sit on Lisa’s front porch, which was decorated with lavender-blue trumpet vines, for the interview.
  2. It was hard not to compare this to my last encounter with Tias, which took place in Chicago during the dreary, overcast days of November, when he was presenting an asana and anatomy intensive at Moksha Yoga Center.
  3. I had some follow-up questions to some of the ideas that Tias provided in his training about the relationship between our habitual physical habits and our emotional bodies.
  4. Each of the five koshas (sheaths) on the yogic path represents a step forward on the journey toward the Self.
  5. Which layer are we looking for and how do we get to it?
  6. Tias Little explains her point of view.
  7. It is important to remember that Anna literally means “food,” and that the food sheath, also known as the nasty sheath, should not be overlooked.

LG: You’re referring to them not consuming enough calories to get them through the day, correct?

It is extremely vital to keep the annamayakosha in good condition!

In order to facilitate learning, it is easy to separate out each sheath; nonetheless, there is a strong connection between all of the sheaths, as evidenced by the fact that they all interpenetrate.

TL: Patterns of holding are very prevalent in the muscular body, and they are very uncomfortable.

I believe that the adrenal system is in charge of our emotional responses to events.

Actually, our emotional body is influenced by the complete hormone system.

Fight or flight–and, I might add, collapse–are all innate responses that are governed by the adrenal system.

How can I get a better understanding?

In his book Waking the Tiger, Peter Levine discusses how when animals are seized by their prey, they typically pretend dead and freeze in place.

As a result, the collapsing pattern can manifest itself in a variety of ways, including very flaccid tissue, a lack of muscular tone, or a particularly insensitive muscle connection.

LG: What Thomas Hanna refers to as “sensory motor amnesia” is the case.

Unlike other adrenal responses, collapsing is not the most prevalent.

For this type of bracing, the back body serves as an excellent receptacle.

LG: Why is it that the rear of the body is being targeted for investigation?

The most important thing is to remain in the now.

People are exposed to dangers of many types from a very young age, including physical, emotional, and psychological threats, to which their bodies respond on an unconscious level by contracting and strengthening.

LG: Dehydrating.does this imply a lack of fluidity and a lack of circulation?

That is an expression I have always admired.

When it comes to fights, bracing and holding on are essential; when it comes to flying, it’s more of a.?

The term “withdrawal” refers to this process.

In reality, it is first and foremost a matter of survival.

At the age of 35, we decide to try yoga because it “looks wonderful,” and then we experience all of the muscular skeletal stress associated with the practice.” That it might be owing to ancient practices of holding is not something we immediately think about.

Infancy can be a starting point for some as part of the startle reaction, but I believe it is more common in the first few years of school.

Accordingly, whether preverbal or adolescent, I believe that patterns may be established from a young age, making them much more difficult to break through in yoga practice.

This is the essence of my personality.

I mean, tightness in the foot may actually indicate concerns of stability or lack of stability.

As a result of needing to keep everything together in a family environment, one’s shoulder blades, upper trapezius, and mid back become quite tense.

In the history of the world, there has never been a thorough treatment of this subject.

It might be due to their structural make-up, it could be partly related to their genetic make-up or cultural history, or it could be due to habitual holding patterns resulting from the fight, flight, or collapse reaction to a stressful event.

To some extent, one’s attitude to the environment, the kind of pressures placed on them, might explain this.

Also, females who develop at a rapid pace.

Thus, it is quite usual for teenage ladies, particularly if they are tall at a young age, to slouch.

What did you intend to say with that statement?

Because they support us, our legs are extremely important to our sense of self-identity.

Additionally, they manifest themselves inside the mother’s arms, as the arms are so strongly associated with receiving, nurturing, and being held by the mother.

In relation to the basic chakras, the knees and feet are related.

A lot of strain is placed on the feet, with the ankles and arches, as well as the big toe, hurting, compressing, and collapsing under the pressure.

I’m wondering how they’re connected.

TL: Extreme tightness in the extremities is fairly prevalent among humans, especially in times of panic.

You should be aware that energy is not truly moving into and out of the body.

G.G.: How can we determine if an energy block is caused by an emotional issue, a physical trauma, or anatomical limitation?

After all, you are well aware that any physical injury would be exacerbated by an emotional response.

For me, fatigue tension is distinct from other types of tension, such as worry tension, which is distinct from the stress that comes from skiing really hard on a snowy mountainside.

To put it another way, it’s like putting up a front or tiptoeing around the topic.

Consequently, we become quite adept at burying, or disguising, our feelings of anxiety.

Psychotherapy treatment mixed with yoga therapy may be quite effective; that is, it is important to not only have a profound awareness of our emotional holding, but also to be aware of where that holding may be located in our bodies and to be able to deal with it in the asanas.

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Is it preferable to hold postures for a longer period of time, for example, or shorter periods of time?

TL;DR As an example, when working with someone who has been abused as a kid, emotionally or sexually, it may be preferable to practice passive, supported poses such as bridge position on the bolster or supta baddha konasana, among other things.

Taking use of your standing position might be really beneficial.

LG: Are you saying that individuals have just re-established their grip?

LG: Are you just constructing another another pattern for yourself to break through to the other side?

Moreover, the philosophy of so many yoga sessions is that the harder we push ourselves and the more difficult the position is, the further we will go.

One more thought.the anandamayakosha, or sheath of pleasure, is the final kosha.

Happiness is, without a doubt, the most pleasurable feeling in the world.

Working with them and acknowledging their existence is essential.

TL: That is correct, thanks.

Nationally and globally, he teaches yoga and anatomy workshops, trainings, and intensives.

Yoga Journal and Yoga International publications often publish Tias’s articles, and he and his wife, Surya Little, co-authored the book sthiram sukham asanam (which literally translates as “a pose in which one may stay stable, tranquil, and comfortable.” Tiana and Surya are partners in the management of the Santa Fe yoga studio YogaSource.

Please visit the website to register. It is his intention to return to Moksha Yoga Center in Chicago from November 17-20, 2005, to conduct an asana workshop and an anatomy intensive. Check out the YogaSource Web site for additional information about Tias and his schedule, which may be found at

Telluride Yoga Fest 2015: Tias & Surya Little

You may hear an interview with yoga instructor Tias Little at the bottom of this piece if you scroll down to the bottom of it. You may purchase tickets/passes for the 8th annual Telluride Yoga Festival on this page. On Sunday, June 21, 2015, the globe was turned upside down – into downward facing dog position. The International Day of Yoga was celebrated on that particular Sunday, and it was the idea of India’s controversial prime leader, Narendra Modi, whose stated goal was to restore national pride and health to the country of origin.

  1. Modi was joined by people from 175 nations in tree position, as well as a slew of other yoga movements called asanas.
  2. In 2015, Tias Little was the primary presenter at the Telluride Yoga Festival.
  3. Originally appearing in the Rig Veda, a revered Hindu literature written about the 15th century B.C., the term “chariot” is a linguistically similar word to “yoke.” It is used to depict a chariot yoked to horses, in which a fallen battle hero may rise to the sun after being defeated.
  4. 200 and 400, the tradition of meditation and exercise emerged among Indian ascetics, and the term “yoga” came to represent the practice of controlling one’s body and mind in order to rise beyond worldly worries.
  5. Following his presentation of yoga to the Western world as a scientifically-based philosophy, Swami Vivekananda, an Indian reformer, created quite a commotion.
  6. At the 8th annual Telluride Yoga Festival, which will take place from Thursday, July 9 – Sunday, July 12, you may sample the pu pu buffet of ideas and techniques on show.
  7. In addition to Tias and Surya Little, who have returned to the roster after a two-year break, there are several more top-tier presenters.

In the Buddhist tradition, prajna is a term that refers to real or transcendental knowledge, which is considered to be one of the greatest levels of practice.

A holistic approach to practice and study, Prajna Yoga integrates anatomy, yoga and Buddhist meditation, Iyengar and Ashtanga concepts of structure, alignment and movement as well as the Sanskrit language, which is the official language of yoga.

Surya Little is a young woman who lives in Surya, India.

His mother, Susan Little, was an Iyengar instructor, and she began educating Tias in that therapeutic lineage in 1984, when he was nine years old.

Iyengar and Pattabhi Jois of Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga, as well as other styles of yoga.

He also works as a registered massage therapist, and his somatic studies have included extensive study in cranial-sacral treatment, among other things.

Additionally, Tias has been a student of Tsoknyi Rinpoche’s Dzogchen practice of Tibetan Buddhism for a long time.

Tias graduated with honors from St.

Aside from that, he’s written three books: “The Thread of Breath,” “Meditations on a Dewdrop,” and an upcoming book titled “Yoga of the Subtle Body.” In addition, Tias provides online yoga courses through YogaGlo.

The all-day intensive will take place on Thursday, July 9, from 9 a.m.

The notion is that we don’t do positions just for the purpose of doing them, but rather for the level of attention they bring to us.

There will be no level distinctions on Friday, July 10, from 8 to 10 a.m.

Tias is a certified yoga instructor.

On Saturday, July 11, from 3 p.m.

Tias prepares the body for this beautiful position, which necessitates flexibility in the ankles, knees, hips, and lower back, in Turning the Body into a Garland.

to 1 p.m., and it is open to all levels.

She began her studies in spiritual healing in 1987 while living at the Hairakhandi Babaji Ashram in Brienz, Switzerland, where she met her husband.

Surya studied with Dr.

She subsequently relocated to New York City in 1990, where she became involved in macrobiotic medicine and eventually began teaching culinary lessons at Gulliver’s Living and Learning Center (now known as Integrative Nutrition), which is operated by Joshua Rosenthal and Marcie Zaroff, among others.

When she moved to Saudi Arabia in 1992, she worked in the city of Ryaad, where she prepared macrobiotic meals and taught yoga to members of the Royal Family.

Surya Little will teach Twisting from the Inside Out on Friday, July 10, from 3 – 5 p.m., for all levels; and Balancing from Head to Toe, with a focus on the structures closest to the ground – the feet in standing balances and the hands or forearms in arm balances – on Sunday, July 12, from 11 a.m.

to 1 p.m., for all levels. To find out more about Tias Little, please press the “play” button and listen to our talk together. The following two tabs alter the content of the section below.

Susan is the creator and editor-in-chief of Telluride Inside. and Out. She is the team’s visionary, and she is responsible for the publication’s content, idea, and development. Susan is a journalist that has covered Telluride’s cultural economy since 1993, which includes non-profits and unique events. A large portion of her work is centered on high-profile figures from the worlds of the arts, entertainment, business, and politics. A former Citibank executive who specialized in strategic planning and new company development, she is also a certified Viniyoga instructor who teaches classes at her home studio.

Surya Little: Yoga for Women’s Health – Adapting Your Practice to the Cycles of Life

The most recent update was made on December 6, 2017. Original publication date: March 15, 2013 Yoga teacher Surya Little is the co-founder of Prajna Yoga, together with her husband, Tias Little. Surya Little offers yoga seminars and yoga teacher trainings around the United States and worldwide. Many years of study in the Ashtanga and Iyengar yoga traditions, as well as a broad grounding in the macrobiotic approach to healing, have shaped Surya’s yoga practice and philosophy. YogaUOnline had an interview with her in which she discussed the various ways in which women’s bodies differ and the consequences this has for our yoga practices.

  • One item that really piqued my curiosity was your time spent in Saudi Arabia, where you taught yoga and prepared macrobiotic meals for members of the royal family.
  • Surya Little: Well, at the time, I was living in New York and working as a member of a macrobiotic healing facility called Gulliver’s Living and Learning Center, which is now closed.
  • By the end of the week, we’d learned that the Saudis were interested in learning how to repair their bodies via food.
  • As a result, they were seeking for something more unconventional.
  • I took advantage of the opportunity.
  • Surya Little: During the year and a half that I was with the family, she dropped between sixty-five and seventy pounds, which was a significant amount of weight loss for her.
  • She was just twenty-eight years old when I met her, and her confidence, as well as her attractiveness, shone through after she began to shed weight and reconnect with her own body.

YogaUOnline: Yoga workshops for women’s health are something you provide as part of your yoga training.

What was the impetus for this particular focus?

That became evident to me when I was in my late forties and attempted to conceive but failed, resulting in a miscarriage.

During those two years, I gained a comprehensive grasp of how to do yoga in a way that is acceptable for a woman’s body, as well as which aspects of my yoga practice were not very useful in the context of preparing to become a mother.

Surya Little: I had to take a step back and not be so strict with the practice, and I had to slow it down.

So, by slowing down my movement in and out of postures and focusing on a more earth-centered practice, I was able to restore balance to my body.

During this time, I also deepened my understanding of inversion practice, and I spent a lot of time doing shoulderstands, which are quite beneficial for women’s health.

YogaUOnline: The female physique is one-of-a-kind in several ways: We go through so many transformations in our life, starting with the beginning of our reproductive years, continuing through our monthly cycle, pregnancy, and motherhood, and finally reaching menopause and peri-menopause.

Should women and men practice yoga in different ways?

As a mature woman, you may find yourself needing to center yourself more, as well as to settle your emotions.

For example, whether you’re working with your diet or with yoga, there are a variety of methods that we may influence the neurological system and bring about more equilibrium in the body.

It’s critical to approach your yoga practice with this level of consciousness.

With regard to assisting people in making dietary improvements, what method do you like to use?

As humans, we are continually exposed to a variety of influences from nature and our surroundings, and we must learn to balance the various types of energetics that exist in our bodies.

As a result, various meals have varying affects on your body’s functions.

Considering everything in terms of the underlying energetics in the body is a good way to start.

The life force may be nourished in a way that brings the energy body back to center instead of allowing it to go to extremes.

One of the reasons yoga is so popular today is that, despite the fact that it is a physical activity, it also links us deeply with our interior organs, which has an impact on our physical bodies as well as our mental and spiritual well-being.

This is especially true if we understand how to employ the yoga asanas in a way that promotes balance; for example, when to prioritize standing poses versus sitting poses versus inversions against other variations.

It is critical to prepare for each phase in order to maintain excellent health on both a physical and mental level. Take a look at Surya Little’s course on YogaUOnline, which is also available: Making the Transition to Maturity – Preparing for the Wisdom Stage of Life

Yoga

On December 06, 2017, we made some changes. 15th of March, 2013 (original version). Surya Little, together with her husband, Tias Little, founded Prajna Yoga, where she offers yoga seminars and yoga teacher trainings both domestically and internationally. Many years of study in the Ashtanga and Iyengar yoga traditions, as well as a comprehensive grounding in the macrobiotic approach to healing, have shaped Surya’s yoga practice and teaching. The ways in which women’s bodies are different from males, as well as the ramifications of this for our yoga practice, are discussed in this interview with YogaUOnline.

  1. One thing that especially piqued my attention was the fact that you spent time in Saudi Arabia teaching yoga and cooking macrobiotic meals for members of the royal family.
  2. My name is Surya Little and I was living in New York City at the time.
  3. Having established ties with Saudi Arabia, the lady who administered the institute began to develop a curriculum specifically for female participants.
  4. The Middle East’s cuisine is high in animal meats and fats, and many of the ladies were overweight as a result of their eating habits there.
  5. As a result of this, I was given the chance to work as a personal assistant cook and yoga instructor for one of the daughters of Saudi Arabia’s monarchy.
  6. It was a long and difficult recovery process for her throughout the year and a half that I was with them.
  7. At the time of our meeting, she was just twenty-eight years old.
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Additionally, the yoga practice assisted her in feeling even more grounded on the inside of her body.

In particular, you will discuss how our yoga practice may aid in the maintenance of hormonal balance during the reproductive cycle as well as throughout natural life changes such as peri- and postmenopause.

In any case, I had been practicing in the Ashtanga yoga method for many years when I realized that no one had ever addressed the female body.

Prior to becoming pregnant, it took me around two years.

YogaUOnline:Could you provide an example of some of the things you’ve had to alter in your personal practice as a result of being more sensitive to your body’s needs as a woman?

Surya Little: My body was overheating as a result of the Vinyasa-based activities that I was engaging in.

I concentrated on static positions, particularly standing poses, in which you maintain a strong connection to the earth’s surface.

I also became really conscientious about my nutrition, making certain that I was receiving appropriate quantities of protein (I’m a vegetarian), and I studied how to cook and eat healthily for the body, in order to prepare for pregnancy and pregnancy-related problems.

It’s a significant and difficult shift.

Surya Little (Surya Little & Associates): It’s critical to understand how your yoga practice can best benefit you in whichever stage of life you’re in right now, so read on.

Having a very rigorous yoga practice will not benefit your nervous system if you’re experiencing irritability and depression.

And for women, it fluctuates throughout the day in response to the many menstrual cycles that we experience.

YogaUOnline: Explain your involvement in the field of nutrition to us.

Surya Little (Surya Little & Associates): For the most part, I work with macrobiotics because it provides excellent insights into how you may heal with food by restoring balance to the body’s energy levels.

Eating has a regenerative effect.

if you’re feeling heavy, bloated, and sluggish, it’s possible that you need to prioritize meals that have heating effects to aid promote digestion, for example, Considering everything in terms of the underlying energetics in the body is a good way to think about everything.

The life force may be nourished in a way that brings the energy body back to center instead of allowing it to swing between extremes.

Even though yoga is a physical activity, it also connects us deeply with our interior organs, which has a physical and mental-spiritual influence on our bodies.

A deep and therapeutic influence on the body may be had by practicing hatha yoga.

A woman’s life is a journey through each stage of her existence (menses, fertility, peri- and menopause, and menopause).

Prepare for each step in order to maintain excellent physical and emotional health throughout the process. Visit YogaUOnline to take Surya Little’s course, which is also available in Spanish: Making the Transition into Maturity – Preparing for the Wisdom Stage of Life

The Approach | An Excerpt from Living the Sutras

This page was last updated on December 6, 2017. Original publication date:March 15, 2013 Surya Little, together with her husband, Tias Little, founded Prajna Yoga, where she conducts yoga workshops and yoga teacher trainings to students all over the world. The Ashtanga and Iyengar yoga traditions have been important parts of Surya’s training, and she also has a strong foundation in the macrobiotic approach to healing. The ways in which women’s bodies are distinct, as well as the ramifications of this for our yoga practice, are discussed in this interview with YogaUOnline.

  • One thing that especially piqued my attention was the fact that you spent time in Saudi Arabia teaching yoga and cooking macrobiotic meals for members of the royal family.
  • Surya Little: Well, I was living in New York at the time and working as a part of a macrobiotic healing facility called Gulliver’s Living and Learning Center.
  • The Saudis became interested in understanding how to repair their bodies with food after that.
  • As a result, they were on the lookout for something more unconventional.
  • YogaUOnline: What type of outcomes did you notice as a result of your practice?
  • She was just twenty-eight years old when I met her, and her confidence, as well as her attractiveness, shone through after she began to shed weight and reconnect with her body.
  • YogaUOnline: Yoga for women’s health is a workshop that you deliver as part of your yoga instruction.

What was the impetus for this specific focus?

That became evident to me when I was in my late forties and attempted to conceive, only to have a miscarriage.

During those two years, I gained a thorough grasp of how to do yoga in a way that is acceptable for a woman’s body, as well as which aspects of my yoga practice were not very useful in the context of preparing to become a mother.

Surya Little: I had to take a step back and not be as strict with the practice, and I had to slow it down.

As a result, by slowing down my movement in and out of postures and focusing on a more earth-centered practice, my body began to regain its equilibrium.

I also gained a better grasp of inversion practice, and I spent a lot of time doing shoulderstands, which are really beneficial for women’s health.

YogaUOnline: The female physique is one-of-a-kind: We go through a lot of transformations in our life, starting with the beginning of our reproductive years, continuing through our monthly cycle, pregnancy, and motherhood, and finally reaching menopause and peri-menopause.

Should women and men practice yoga in a different way?

If you’re a mature woman, you can find that you need to ground yourself more, that you need to stabilize.

So whether you’re working with your diet or with yoga, there are a variety of ways that we can influence the nervous system and bring about more balance in your body.

It’s critical to approach your yoga practice with this kind of mindfulness in mind.

When working with people to achieve dietary adjustments, what method do you like to use?

We are continually exposed to a variety of diverse influences from nature and our surroundings, and we must learn how to balance these many forms of energetics in our bodies.

As a result, various meals have varying affects on your body.

Considering everything in terms of the underlying energetics of the body is a good way to start.

We have the ability to nurture the life force in a way that pulls the energy body back to the center rather than to the extremities.

One of the reasons yoga is so popular today is that, despite the fact that it is a physical activity, it also links us deeply with our interior organs, which has an impact on both our physical and mental-spiritual health.

This is especially true if we understand how to employ the yoga asanas in a way that promotes balance; for example, when to prioritize standing poses versus sitting poses versus inversions and so on.

It is critical to prepare for each phase in order to maintain healthy physical and emotional health. Take a look at Surya Little’s course on YogaUOnline, which includes the following: The Road to Maturity – Preparing for Life’s Wisdom Phase

Free Download | Yoga for Brain + Nervous System Health

Would you desire to maintain the health of your brain and nervous system as you get older? These 20 pages give essential information on how aging affects your brain, central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, digestive system, circulatory system, and other organs and systems of the body. You can do several simple things to maintain these systems functioning properly; find out how yoga might assist you! This guide comes to a close with a.

Living the Sutras | Free Yoga Class + Meditation Audio

Kelly DiNardo leads a 25-minute asana session that is both engaging and balanced, and then Amy Pearce-Hayden leads an 8-minute guided meditation that will help you gain a better perspective on your issues. To listen, please enter your email address. JTNDZm9ybSUyMGFjdGlvbiUzRCUyMmh0dHAlM0ElMkYlMkZlbWFpbC5zaGFtYmhhbGEuY29tJTJGcHVibGljJTJGd2ViZm9ybSUyRnByb2Nlc3MlMkYlMjIlMjBtZXRob2QlM0QlMjJwb3N0JTIyJTNFJTBBJTNDaW5wdXQlMjB0eXBlJTNEJTIyaGlkZGVuJTIyJTIwbmFtZSUzRCUyMmZpZCUyMiUyMHZhbHVlJTNEJTIyMmRubWowYmh5cXl0ZHkzNnZwNjc4OXFmeGh0OXMlMjIlMjAlMkYlM0UlMEElM0NpbnB1dCUyMHR5cGUlM0QlMjJoaWRkZW4lMjIlMjBuYW1lJTNEJTIyc2lkJTIyJTIwdmFsdWUlM0QlMjIyODMxZTgxZDAzMTZhMTdkZWJkYzhmYjM5NzVhOTNlOSUyMiUyMCUyRiUzRSUwQSUzQ2lucHV0JTIwd ZSUzRCUyMmhpZGRlbiUyMiUyMG5hbWUlM0QlMjJkZWxpZCUyMiUyMG5hbWUlM0QlMjAlMkYlM0UlM0UlMEElM0NpbnB1dCUyMHR5cGUlM0QlMjIlMjAlMkYlM0Ul You have the option to unsubscribe at any time.

Yoga, Fascia, and the Feeling of Being Me

Tias Little, author of Yoga of the Subtle Body, shares his thoughts on the subject. What exactly is fascia? Fascia is the mechanism that allows us to move in the same manner as a fish swims in water and a bird flies through the air. With every triangle posture or camel stance, you stretch a full network of cellophane-like tissue (or “cling-wrap” if you are in the camel pose) throughout your body. This entry was published on January 30, 2018.

The Most Popular Posts from the Yoga for Healthy Aging Blog

Nina Zolotow, author of Yoga for Healthy Aging, shares her thoughts. Because the Yoga for Healthy Aging blog will be celebrating its sixth anniversary next week, I thought I’d take a look back to see which entries have been the most popular—or at the very least the most viewed—over the years. (Nine may appear to be a random number, but for some reason, it is the number chosen by the Blogger.) The post was published on December 22nd, 2017.

Yoga for Balance | An Excerpt from Yoga for Healthy Aging

From the book Yoga for Healthy Aging: A Guide to Lifelong Well-Being by Baxter Bell and Nina Zolotow, we have included an excerpt from the chapter “Yoga for Balance.” This chapter discusses balance, how yoga can help you improve your balance, and yoga practices that can help you develop your balance more quickly. To read “Yoga for Balance” from Yoga for Healthy Aging, please visit this link. Brentwood Yoga, located in Brentwood, California, is a favorite of ours. Books that are related This entry was published on December 7th, 2017.

Meditation on the Third Eye

As described in detail by Tias Little, author of Yoga of the Subtle Body, meditation on the third-eye center is one of the most traditional and well-known subtle body training practices.

I’ve been thinking about the effectiveness of this practice, and I’d want to share my opinions with you. The bridge of the nose is referred to as the Nasya Mula, or the Root of the Nose, in Sanskrit. This entry was published on December 6, 2017.

Breathing Practice

Tias Little, author of Yoga of the Subtle Body, shares his thoughts on the subject. It is critical, above all else, to become familiar with the quality of our own breath. My initial attempt to widen my breath in the same manner I consciously stretched in a yoga stance was unsuccessful. However, I have learnt that it is vital, if not absolutely necessary. This entry was published on December 6, 2017.

Coming to Your Senses in Yoga Poses

Nina Zolotow, author of Yoga for Healthy Aging, shares her thoughts. Asanas serve to calm the mind by directing attention to physical sensations, breath, or drishti (life force) (gaze). If we can apply the same level of concentration to our Accessible Yoga practice, we will quickly understand that the outer look of a position is not a reliable indicator of whether or not someone is engaged in yoga practice. The post was published on November 27th, 2017.

Salamba Prasarita Padottanasana | An Excerpt from RestoreRebalance

We’ve taken an extract from the chapter “Salamba Prasarita Padottanasana: Supported Wide-Legged Forward Bend” in Judith Hanson Lasater’s book Restore and Rebalance. This chapter explains how to perform the Salamba Prasarita Padottanasana, also known as the Supported Wide-Legged Forward Bend position, correctly. The following is an excerpt from “Salamba Prasarita Padottanasana: Supported Wide-Legged Forward Bend,” which can be found in the Restore and Rebalance Related Books section. The post was published on November 27th, 2017.

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