Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India by Dinesh Khanna and Pico Iyer

Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India: Dinesh, Khanna, Iyer, Pico: 9780060578237: Amazon.com: Books

“India must reclaim and reveal her spirit,” says the author. The Mother is a woman who has given birth to a child (Sri Aurobindo Ashram, Pondicherry) Some years ago, while browsing in a bookstore in a little university town in the United States, I came upon a gorgeous picture book that I had to have. In the book named Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India, images shot by the well-known Indian photographer Dinesh Khanna are displayed alongside essays written by Khanna. I had seen some of his photographs on the internet, but it was this book that truly cemented my admiration for his art.

21).

This is something I admire and value the most about it.

At the same time, the sheer profusion of “sacred” is unquestionably a visual representation, as emphasized by Indian culture, of the ideal of spiritual goal of life, and can serve as a deeply healing force in its own right for the sea of humanity struggling with its myriad struggles of life and living.

At least, that’s how I’ve come to know and appreciate the country of India.

Who knows what will happen?

That appears to be the case, at least to me.

It can be found everywhere and in every religious system. A wonderful visual portrayal of this India is provided by the book, Living Faith, which perceives and attempts to experience the Divine in all things and yet is beyond all things and everything else.

Living Faith : Windows into the Sacred Life of India: Dinesh, Khanna, Iyer, Pico: Amazon.com: Books

The spirit of India must be rediscovered and shown. It is the mother who has the power to accomplish anything she wants (Sri Aurobindo Ashram, Pondicherry) I stumbled found a gorgeous picture book at a bookstore in a tiny university town in the United States a few years ago and wanted to buy it right away. An exhibition of images by renowned Indian photographer Dinesh Khanna entitled Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India is included in this book. After seeing some of his photographs on the internet, I became a true lover of his art after reading this book.

There is recognition of the power of private worship and united faith, which eventually transcends the more visible but fleeting realities of strife.” Pico Iyer (who has written an introductory essay to this book) describes what this remarkable collection of photographs captures as “something of what India does, at its best: namely, to take individual moments of worship, private acts of devotion – the soul in solitary colloquy with God – and somehow weave them into the larger fabric of society and life” (p.

21).

This is something I really admire and respect about it.

At the same time, the sheer profusion of “sacred” is unquestionably a visual representation, as emphasized by Indian culture, of the ideal of spiritual aim of life, and can serve as a deeply healing force in its own right for the sea of humanity struggling with the myriad challenges of life and living.

At least, that’s how I’ve come to know and appreciate the country.

Who knows what the future holds for us.

To my mind, it appears to be the case in this instance.

All religious traditions are affected by this phenomenon. The book, Living Faith, is a fantastic visual picture of this India.of the Living Faith that perceives and attempts to encounter the Divine in all and everything, and yet is beyond all and everything.

Living Faith

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We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. Please tell us what you think about this preview of Living Faith by Dinesh Khanna. We will fix it as soon as possible. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. Begin your examination of India’s Sacred Life as Seen Through the Eyes of Living Faith Tuesday, December 02, 2013 Beloo Mehrarated it, and she thought it was fantastic. Faith comes to life and takes its first breath through images. “India must reclaim and reveal her spirit,” says the author.

  1. In the book named Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India, images shot by the well-known Indian photographer Dinesh Khanna are displayed alongside essays written by Khanna.
  2. Faith comes to life and takes its first breath through images.
  3. The Mother is a woman who has given birth to a child (Sri Aurobindo Ashram, Pondicherry) Some years ago, while browsing in a bookstore in a little university town in the United States, I came upon a gorgeous picture book that I had to have.
  4. I had seen some of his photographs on the internet, but it was this book that truly cemented my admiration for his art.
  5. 21).
  6. This is something I admire and value the most about it.

At the same time, the sheer profusion of “sacred” is unquestionably a visual representation, as emphasized by Indian culture, of the ideal of spiritual goal of life, and can serve as a deeply healing force in its own right for the sea of humanity struggling with its myriad struggles of life and living.

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Living Faith: Windows Into the Sacred Life of India (Hardcover)

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The breathtaking photos inLiving Faithare the result of more than a decade and a half of travel and observation by the photographer. Using photos taken in India’s cities, small towns, and villages – a land of almost unmatched variety in which every major religion on the planet has found a home – Dinesh Khanna shows us how faith thrives in the face of everyday challenges and obstacles. The night sky is lit up by priests on the ghats of Varanasi in honor of Shiva; Sufis sing ecstatic love songs to Allah at the tomb of Nizamuddin Auliya; young boys in Ladakh train to live the austere life of a Buddhist Lama; and devotees offer wax models of whatever they desire to Mary at her church in Mumbai.

Living Faithis a personal and illuminating account of a very spiritual way of living that is deeply personal.

Specifications of the product HarperOnePublisher:HarperOnePublication Date:December 1st, 2003Pages:206 ISBN:9780060578237 Publisher:HarperOnePages:206

9780060578237: Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India – AbeBooks

Over a decade and a half of travel and observation have culminated in the breathtaking photos inLiving Faith. Photographer Dinesh Khanna captures photos of faith as it is expressed in everyday life in India’s cities, small towns, and villages. India is a land of almost unmatched variety, where nearly every major religion on the planet has made its home. The night sky is lit up by priests on the ghats of Varanasi in honor of Shiva; Sufis sing ecstatic love songs to Allah at the tomb of Nizamuddin Auliya; young boys in Ladakh train to live the austere life of a Buddhist Lama; and devotees offer wax models of what they desire to Mary at her church in Mumbai.

Intimate and insightful, Living Faith is the story of a very spiritual way of living.

Detailed Information about the Product HarperOnePublisher:HarperOnePublication Date:December 1st, 2003Pages:206 ISBN:9780060578237 Publisher:HarperOnePublisher:HarperOne

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  • Living faith is an incredible concept that was masterfully handled. Bazaar was a better choice for me, but this was better. This is a fantastic discussion starter.

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Living Faith by Pico Iyer, Dinesh Khanna

“The practice of living religion in India takes place in full color: you may describe the subcontinent with nearly any term you choose, but the one phrase you are unlikely to hear is ‘dead.’ Everything is moving, pressing together, and drifting away again, and yet nothing is ever changing — the way a color reflects the sun in all of its passing movements becomes different every moment of the day, and yet tomorrow, at dawn, is shown to be very much the same as it was at dawn this morning — at some level, everything is moving, pressing together, and drifting away again.” When you first arrive in India, it’s easy to have the impression that there are so many sacred locations that they swallow up everything, making every area consecrated in their own way.

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A venerated object can be found on every square inch of the city, even if it is no more exalted than a Hollywood goddess.

Jains, Jews, and Syrian Christians are all practicing their respective styles of devotion, with the consequence that India might appear to be teeming with gods at times.

Living Faith: Windows Into the Sacred Life of India by Pico & Dinesh Khanna Iyer – Hardcover – 2003 – from B-Line Books (SKU: 45891)

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Harpercollins. 2003. Fine in Near Fine condition with Near Fine dust jacket. A hardcover edition with ISBN 0060578238. In excellent condition with just minimal wear to the dust cover. Measures 10.94 by 8.78 by 0.90 inches with 206 pages.

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BooksellerB-Line Books(CA)Bookseller’s Inventory45891 Bookseller’s Inventory Living Faith: Windows Into the Sacred Life of India is the title of this book. Pico Iyer is the author of this work. Dinesh Khanna is a Bollywood actor. Format/binding Hardcover Condition of the book Fine in a Near Fine dust jacket that has been used.

Binding Hardcover ISBN 100060578238ISBN 139780060578237 ISBN 100060578238ISBN 139780060578237 PublisherHarpercollinsPublishing locationHarpercollins San Francisco, California, United States of AmericaDate of publication2003Keywords0060578238Bookseller catalogs Religion;

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India’s Faiths in New Frames

Almost a decade ago, photographer Dinesh Khanna set out to document the ordinary lives of his fellow Indians as well as the country’s kaleidescopic culture. His voyage has resulted in the publication of two collections: “Bazaar” (2001) and his most recent book, “Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India.” As religious conflict has wreaked havoc on India’s politics, Khanna has been increasingly compelled to convey a different tale, one that emphasizes the country’s exceptionally peaceful religious plurality.

  • How did you become interested in photography and writing this book?
  • He was the one who taught me the fundamentals.
  • After ten years, I decided to leave.
  • That was the beginning of this quest.
  • I was on a mission to track down the other India.
  • What was it about faith that drew your attention?
  • People go to a temple or mosque for religious reasons, and a bazaar develops up as a result.

In India, the political leadership has appropriated foreign concepts, namely, sociology and secularism, and has superimposed them on our economic and religious beliefs.

Did your personal religious beliefs influence the writing of the book?

While traveling, I came across a clear divide between faith and religion, which I found to be: Faith is personal and instinctual; it is not dependent on a physical body, a formal structure, or an external representation.

The desecration of the Babri mosque by Hindu mobs in 1992 left a lasting impression on me.

In most cases, most Indians live in calm and pleasant environments.

What was the inspiration for the title “Living Faith”?

Rituals, holy days, and festivals are all part of religion.

You are under no need to stop, remove your shoes, or say a prayer.

It does not require external manifestation since it is internal and instinctive.

Not all of it is, but a significant portion of it is.

My father was a Hindu, while my mother was a Sikh.

Nonetheless, we were never instructed that we had to do this.

I was brought up to be an Indian.

I absolutely believe in something, and I’ve absorbed it.

India is distinguished by its plurality of religious beliefs.

There will be no Jews.

The logistics of the situation did not work out.

As for the Jews, I arrived in Cochin far too late.

There are influences from both Hinduism and Islam, as well as Hinduism and Christianity.

In temples, mosques, and churches, I’ve observed believers sewing threads together.

Were you aware of your kinship when you first started working together?

In South India, there is a church that attracts as many Hindus as it does Christians.

Mary in Mumbai, I saw wax replicas of computers and planes—Christians have copied the Hindu practice of offering God a model of whatever they pray for, as I witnessed.

Visiting Sufi shrines, I observed Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims worshiping alongside one another, as they have done for centuries.

The behaviors are subsequently incorporated into the religion that has been accepted.

Faith is first and foremost about being a good human being; it is about humanism, as Pico Iyer points out.

I was particularly taken with two striking images: a basket of silvery fish topped with a single brilliant red pepper on one page, and a potato seller’s weighing scale on the opposite page, which was holding a marigold from the morning prayers.

The chile protects against the evil eye, while the marigold was presented as a prayer for a successful transaction.

The fact that we live in an agricultural nation means that we have a specific relationship with nature.

It’s only natural in a hot nation; the shade is appreciated, and the tree takes on greater significance.

Rivers are life givers; cultures have grown up around and around them, and people have relied on them for almost all they have needed.

Why aren’t the magnificent ancient temples represented?

Even while photographing major celebrations (such as the Kumbh Mela and Mohurram), I concentrated on the people rather than the spectacle.

For some, it is a site where they will come face to face with the deity who is the source of their religion.

You’ve caught some stunning hues.

It may be found in cuisine, clothing, on walls, and in architecture.

I’m paying tribute to the artistic abilities of others.

Color is a difficult subject for me to shoot as a photographer.

Color is constantly present in our environment.

Is there a difference in the way faiths utilize color?

The presence of Muslim and Christian houses of worship is relatively subdued.

This triangular piece of granite is transformed into a statue of Ganesha for the folks who live in this residence.

Aside from catching the color, what additional difficulties did you encounter?

The majority of these photographs were taken in large groups, during festivals.

You’re about to capture the perfect moment and composition when a cow wanders by, a scooter passes by, and someone pushes you as they were being pushed by 20 others.

Before the image was developed, I had no idea that this youngster was in the picture.

It was both his and my karma that brought us together at a time when there was no traffic on the highway.

It is only one of the numerous disparities that exist in India.

Taking up weapons and defending one’s homeland against intruders is a fundamental part of Sikhism.

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They do not really fight, but rather wield spears and swords that are symbolic of their beliefs.

It’s antique and medieval in appearance, yet it’s bursting with life.

Their nuns are unmarried, they carry their worldly things on their backs, and they are bald—their hair is plucked out rather than shaved—in order to maintain their baldness.

Ladakh and Leh are naked and bare-bones, so basic in a desert at 15,000 feet above sea level.

Similarly to traditional Hinduism, where you live in spartan conditions but are surrounded by symbols that are opulent, enormous, and brightly colored, so it is with Buddhism.

After 600 years of persecution, the Dalai Lama has been granted shelter in India, just as the Zoroastrians were 600 years ago.

Buddhism has resurfaced in the form of neo-Buddhists, and Japanese Buddhism has gained popularity.

Not people, but the political life of a nation is what causes the ugliness of religious strife to manifest itself.

It is about power, not belief, in this case. Will India’s trust in the future survive? Indians’ belief in the existence of life itself is so fundamental, so fundamental to their survival, that it can’t be shaken.

Why aren’t the magnificent ancient temples represented? I wanted to concentrate on the little things in life rather than on the big things. Even while photographing major celebrations (such as the Kumbh Mela and Mohurram), I concentrated on the people rather than the spectacle. I stood for hours watching people enter and exit temples, and I saw that no pilgrim looked at the temple itself, no matter how beautiful it was. For some, it is a site where they will come face to face with the deity who is the source of their religion.

  • You’ve caught some stunning hues.
  • It may be found in cuisine, clothing, on walls, and in architecture.
  • I’m paying tribute to the artistic abilities of others.
  • Color is a difficult subject for me to shoot as a photographer.
  • Color is constantly present in our environment.
  • Is there a difference in the way faiths utilize color?
  • The presence of Muslim and Christian houses of worship is relatively subdued.

This triangular piece of granite is transformed into a statue of Ganesha for the folks who live in this residence.

Aside from catching the color, what additional difficulties did you encounter?

The majority of these photographs were taken in large groups, during festivals.

You’re about to capture the perfect moment and composition when a cow wanders by, a scooter passes by, and someone pushes you as they were being pushed by 20 others.

Before the image was developed, I had no idea that this youngster was in the picture.

It was both his and my karma that brought us together at a time when there was no traffic on the highway.

It is only one of the numerous disparities that exist in India.

Taking up weapons and defending one’s homeland against intruders is a fundamental part of Sikhism.

They do not really fight, but rather wield spears and swords that are symbolic of their beliefs.

It’s antique and medieval in appearance, yet it’s bursting with life.

Their nuns are unmarried, they carry their worldly things on their backs, and they are bald—their hair is plucked out rather than shaved—in order to maintain their baldness.

Ladakh and Leh are naked and bare-bones, so basic in a desert at 15,000 feet above sea level.

Similarly to traditional Hinduism, where you live in spartan conditions but are surrounded by symbols that are opulent, enormous, and brightly colored, so it is with Buddhism.

After 600 years of persecution, the Dalai Lama has been granted shelter in India, just as the Zoroastrians were 600 years ago.

Buddhism has resurfaced in the form of neo-Buddhists, and Japanese Buddhism has gained popularity.

Not people, but the political life of a nation is what causes the ugliness of religious strife to manifest itself.

Will India’s trust in the future survive?

Faith Lives and Breathes through Images

Dinesh Khanna began photographing his fellow Indians’ everyday lives and the country’s kaleidescopic culture more than a decade ago, and he hasn’t looked back since. A book called “Bazaar” (2001) and a new book, “Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India,” are both collections of poems inspired by his travels. During a time when religious discord has interrupted India’s politics, Khanna has been increasingly compelled to convey a different tale, one that highlights India’s extraordinary tolerance for religious differences.

  • I’m curious about how you got into photography and this particular book.
  • He was the one who taught me the fundamentals of the game of basketball.
  • The decision to leave came after ten years of collaboration and the realization of a personal vision that needed to be communicated.
  • Because I work in advertising, which is targeted at the middle-class, I’ve come to understand that there’s a whole country I’m not familiar with.
  • I was intrigued by our religious leaders, from whom I had felt estranged for a long period of time.
  • So forthright, so unafraid, is the practice of faith.
  • A relationship exists between commerce and faith.

Intellectuals in India have transformed secularism into non-religion, if not outright anti-religion.

I, on the other hand, am not a believer.

Religious beliefs and practices are organized, they follow a framework, and they are subject to manipulation.

Afterwards, when the riots in Gujarat erupted, I became so distraught that I informed my publisher that I “didn’t want to produce this book anymore.” Fortunately, I was certain that what had occurred had nothing to do with my religious beliefs.

A completion of the book was necessary.

Despite the fact that faith is distinct and personal in nature, it is practiced publicly in India on a day-to-day, minute-to-moment, and non-event basis on a daily, moment to moment, and non-event basis.

If you’re walking down the street and you see a shrine, your head naturally bobs, and you continue walking.

Now that’s what I call confidence.

In your work, you claim that Indian religion is usually practiced in a public manner.

The shrine or the holy book is found in every home.

The Sikhs’ sacred book, the Guru Granth Sahib, was kept in a little shrine in the house, and she read from it on a daily basis, which he found comforting.

Was your religion Hindu or Sikh while you were growing up.

I practice two religions, but I don’t have a shrine in my home to honor either one.

You portray India as being accepting, as though every major faith has found a place in the country.

India is characterized by its plurality of cultures and religions.

It is not acceptable to have Jews in the room.

Despite our best efforts, the logistics did not come together.

As for the Jews, I arrived in Cochin too late to make a difference there.

Influences from both Hindu and Muslim cultures, as well as Hindu and Christian cultures, may be detected.

Temples, mosques, and churches have all had worshippers stringing threads together.

Is it true you weren’t aware of your connection when you first started dating?

In South India, there is a church that attracts as many Hindus as it does Christian worshippers.

Mary in Mumbai; Christians have embraced the Hindu practice of presenting God a representation of anything they pray for.

I witnessed Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims worshiping side by side in Sufi shrines, just as they have done for centuries in the same place.

The rituals are subsequently assimilated into the religion that has been accepted.

Faith is first and foremost about being a decent human being; it is about humanism, as Pico Iyer explains.

A pair of striking images stood out to me: a basket of silvery fish, which was capped with a single brilliant red pepper, and a potato seller’s weighing scale, which was holding a marigold from the morning prayers on the opposite page.

It was offered in prayer for a successful sale with the chile, which wards off the evil eye.

The fact that we live in an agricultural nation means that we have a unique relationship with nature.

The need for shade is understandable in a hot nation; the tree takes on greater significance.

Throughout history, rivers have been life givers, cultures have sprung up around and around them, and people have relied on them for everything.

We’re not sure why the big old temples aren’t included.

Even while photographing big celebrations (such as the Kumbh Mela and Mohurram), I concentrated on the people rather than the spectacle.

It is a site where people hope to come face to face with the god who has inspired their beliefs.

Beautiful color captures by you.

Everything from food to clothing to wall murals to architecture contains it.

The artistry of others is being recognized and honored.

Color presents a challenge to me as a photographer.

Everywhere we look, we can see color.

Is there a difference in the way faiths utilize colors?

There is a greater lack of activity at Muslim and Christian houses of worship.

Because of the individuals that live in this residence, this triangular rock is transformed into a Ganesha statue.

Beyond catching the hue, what additional difficulties did you face?

The continual jostling and shoveling that you experience in India is unbearable.

On the street where the cover photo was taken was a lot of traffic.

On the street, he was running around and playing with the youngsters.

Armed Sikhs are placed in opposition to peaceful Jains in your article.

Hinduism’s military wing was known as Sikhism.

Horsemen are still considered to be a Sikh subsect, the Nihangs.

I went to a Sikh festival where they had horseriding and swordfighting competitions, which I quite enjoyed.

Due of their nonviolent beliefs, the Jains wear mouth masks so that not even bacteria may enter into their mouths.

Pictures of Tibetan Buddhists were put in your collection.

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The monasteries, on the other hand, are flamboyant and vibrant, more so than a discotheque.

In India, Buddhism developed and spread throughout the world, but it eventually died out in the region.

Now, just as the Jews were welcomed centuries ago, he is being welcomed now.

Tibetans, like others before them, discovered warmth in India.

Not believing is important; it is about having power. Are there any signs that Indians have trust in their government? It is impossible for Indians to abandon their belief in the existence of life as such since it is so vital and central to their existence.

We’re not sure why the big old temples aren’t included. The everyday grind, rather than major events, was what I want. Even while photographing big celebrations (such as the Kumbh Mela and Mohurram), I concentrated on the people rather than the spectacle. I spent hours observing pilgrims at temples and found that hardly one took the time to look at the temple itself, despite the fact that it was magnificent. It is a site where people hope to come face to face with the god who has inspired their beliefs.

  • Beautiful color captures by you.
  • Everything from food to clothing to wall murals to architecture contains it.
  • The artistry of others is being recognized and honored.
  • Color presents a challenge to me as a photographer.
  • Everywhere we look, we can see color.
  • Is there a difference in the way faiths utilize colors?
  • There is a greater lack of activity at Muslim and Christian houses of worship.

Because of the individuals that live in this residence, this triangular rock is transformed into a Ganesha statue.

Beyond catching the hue, what additional difficulties did you face?

The continual jostling and shoveling that you experience in India is unbearable.

On the street where the cover photo was taken was a lot of traffic.

On the street, he was running around and playing with the youngsters.

Armed Sikhs are placed in opposition to peaceful Jains in your article.

Hinduism’s military wing was known as Sikhism.

Horsemen are still considered to be a Sikh subsect, the Nihangs.

I went to a Sikh festival where they had horseriding and swordfighting competitions, which I quite enjoyed.

Due of their nonviolent beliefs, the Jains wear mouth masks so that not even bacteria may enter into their mouths.

Pictures of Tibetan Buddhists were put in your collection.

The monasteries, on the other hand, are flamboyant and vibrant, more so than a discotheque.

In India, Buddhism developed and spread throughout the world, but it eventually died out in the region.

Now, just as the Jews were welcomed centuries ago, he is being welcomed now.

Tibetans, like others before them, discovered warmth in India.

Not believing is important; it is about having power.

It is impossible for Indians to abandon their belief in the existence of life as such since it is so vital and central to their existence.

Iyer, Pico 1957–

(Siddharth Pico Iyer and Stephen Robert Iyer, respectively) PERSONAL:Given name, Stephen Robert Iyer; born February 11, 1957, in Oxford, England; son of Raghavan Narasimhan (a professor) and Nandini (a professor; maiden name, Mehta) Iyer; partner’s name Hiroko; father Raghavan Narasimhan (a professor); mother Nandini (a professor; maiden name, Mehta) Iyer Education: B.A., 1978, M.A., 1982, both from Oxford University; A.M., 1980, both from Harvard University.

ADDRESSES: Agent c/o Author Mail, Random House, 1745 Broadway, New York, NY 10019; Random House, 1745 Broadway, New York, NY 10019 CAREER:Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, teaching fellow, 1980–82; Timemagazine, New York, NY, staff writer, 1982–86; freelance writer, 1990–present

WRITINGS:

Concord Grove (Santa Barbara, CA) published The Recovery of Innocence in 1984. Cuba and the Night is a book published by Knopf (New York, NY) in 1995. ‘Buddha, the Living Way’ by deForest Trimingham, pictures by deForest Trimingham, published by Random House (New York, NY) in 1998. Abandon: A Romance is a novel published by Knopf (New York, NY) in 2003. Author of the introduction to Living Faith: Windows into the Sacred Life of India, by Dinesh Khanna, published by Harper & Row, San Francisco, 2004.

TRAVEL

In Video Night in Kathmandu: And Other Reports from the Not-So-Far East, Knopf (New York, NY) published a book in 1989. Knopf (New York, NY) published The Lady and the Monk: Four Seasons in Kyoto in 1991. In 1993, Knopf published a book titled Falling off the Map: Some Lonely Places of the World, which was published in New York. 1997: Tropical Classical: Essays from a Variety of Perspectives, published by Knopf (New York, NY). The Global Soul: Jet Lag, Shopping Malls, and the Search for Home, Knopf (New York, NY), 2000.

  • Sun after Dark: Flights into the Foreign, Knopf (New York, NY), 2004.
  • (Editor, in collaboration with Jason Wilson) A collection of the best American travel writing, published by Houghton Mifflin (Boston, MA) in 2004.
  • SIDELIGHTS: Photo by courtesy of Pico Iyer on Flickr.
  • He is best known for his travel novels, which are ruminations on his international travels.
  • Since then, he has published numerous additional books on his travels.
  • Kathmandu Chronicles: Video Night in Kathmandu Iyer’s investigations through Asian nations, including Nepal, India, Burma, Japan, and China, and his discussion of the ways in which these territories have been influenced by Western culture are detailed in this book.
  • products and singing songs by Western pop singers are included in the book, which includes visits to places such as Tokyo Disneyland and India’s developing film industry.

“Video Night in Kathmandu” was described as “delightful” by Law-Yone, who went on to say that “Iyer’s exceptional talent is enough justification for him to travel anyplace in the world he desires.” When Sharon Dirlam wrote a review of Video Night in Kathmandu for the Los Angeles Times Book Review, she concluded that “anyone who is interested in Bali Tibet Nepal China the Philippines Myanmar India Thailand or Japan will find in these pages a sensual feast of rich impressions.” “Anyone interested in Bali Tibet Nepal China the Philippines Myanmar India Thailand Japan will find in these pages a sensual feast of rich impressions,” she wrote.

  1. When he is not traveling, Iyer spends his time in Japan with his companion Hiroko, where he wrote his second travel book, The Lady and the Monk: Four Seasons in Kyoto, which is set in the country.
  2. In The Lady and the Monk, Iyer recounts his year-long journey in Kyoto, Japan, where he traveled to learn more about that country’s art and writing, as well as about the Zen sect of Buddhism, which he discovered during his travels.
  3. The Lady and the Monkas, as described by Lesley Downer in the New York Times Book Review, is a novel about a woman who falls in love with a monk “.
  4. full of sharp and accurate insights into the country and its people that will strike fellow Japanophiles with a sense of déjà vu.

Additionally, as the title suggests, it is also a reflection on more general subjects.” Tropical Classical: Essays from a Variety of Points of View gathers together twelve years’ worth of Iyer’s pieces, which include reflections on Ethiopia, Lhasa, Tibet, and other far-flung destinations, into one volume.

at his keenly observant and zestfully descriptive best” in this work, which she found to be “an undaunted and philosophical traveler.

The author’s forte, according to Seaman, is recording the intermixing of civilizations, which is a phenomenon that is both infinitely relevant and intriguing.

Library Journal contributor Ali Houissa wrote, “This is not your typical trip reporting.” “It is with a refreshing sense of inquiry and minimal cultural stereotyping that Iyer digs sharply into cultural and social critique, political and philosophical studies, and other areas of study.

This “breathless look at today’s world” is informed by “a swirl of locations, time zones, and cultures,” according to a Publishers Weekly writer, who added: “As he does in his magazine pieces, Iyer brings a fine spiritual current to his writing, and his descriptive talents are unsurpassed, even if he lets his mouth hang open a little too wide marveling at the postmodernism of it all.” Taking a leisurely cultural journey around the globe in his most recent trip pick, Sun after Dark: Flights into the Foreign, Iyer makes a desultory cultural voyage across the globe.

  1. Throughout the book, he discusses a broad range of unconnected topics, such as his time while imprisoned in Bolivia and a reflective essay on the Cambodian killing fields.
  2. Sebald, both of whom had experienced the feeling of being a stranger in even familiar settings, as had he.
  3. “When you are at home, you might get overly comfortable and confined in your surroundings.
  4. Iyer has periodically strayed from his well-established career as a travel writer in order to branch out into fiction, following in the tradition of making oneself purposefully uncomfortable.
  5. He meets Camilla through her sister, who happens to be a fellow Rumi scholar, while looking into reports of a series of lost manuscripts by the poet.
  6. As John and Camilla discover that they have a mutual desire to find a place in their life to call home, a romance begins to blossom between them.
  7. The less conscious one is of one’s status as a “writer,” the better one’s work will be.
  8. A letter to a lover should be as spontaneous and urgent as a message to a friend who has just experienced the death of a parent, and writing should be no exception.

As a result of the ways in which a writer is compelled to delve into secret parts of himself that even those closest to him are unaware of, writing is ultimately that weirdest of anomalies: an intimate letter sent to a stranger.”

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

In 1995, Thomson Gale published a book titled Notable Asian Americans (Detroit, MI).

PERIODICALS

In 1995, Thomson Gale (Detroit, MI) published Notable Asian Americans.

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