Q&A: Chelsea Jackson on Diversity

Q&A: Chelsea Jackson on Diversity + Embracing Who You Are

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Yoga Journal: How did you get into yoga?

Chelsea Jackson (Courtesy of the New York Times): It was via hot yoga that I first discovered yoga in 2001, and I used it to treat health issues such as high cholesterol and joint discomfort. Then, in 2004, while grieving the death of my closest friend, who had been killed, I came upon Kashi, an urban, traditional yoga ashram in Atlanta, Georgia. Yoga became therapeutic for me when I began to learn from my instructor Swami Jaya Devi how to go deeper into my practice and go beyond the physical aspects of it.

As of now, I am mostly a Hatha Yoga instructor, with some Restorative Vinyasa Flow mixed in.

  • YJ: Could you perhaps clarify how the practice aided you in your therapeutic endeavors?
  • Yoga and meditation assisted me in approaching this horrible thing that I wanted to drive out of my head in a way that welcomed it and utilized it as a tool for improving my view on life, which was quite beneficial.
  • YJ: At the time, you were a teacher in an elementary school.
  • CJ: I was experiencing a lot of tension in the classroom, so I decided to incorporate breathing exercises into the lesson.
  • The youngsters showed a great deal more sympathy toward one another and toward themselves.
  • Later, I opted to pursue a PhD in yoga integration, especially with kids from underprivileged areas, at Emory University, where I had been working for the previous year.
  • YJ: Could you tell me about the subject of your dissertation?

I worked with young girls who all identified as black or African-American, but who came from a variety of educational backgrounds, including charter schools, private schools, and Title 1 schools, resulting in a diverse group of students.

We read poems written by women of color and have volunteer yoga teachers give classes that are related to the poetry subject.

See also YJ’s Good Karma Awards for more information.

So, what have you taken away from your first year at Yoga, Literature, and Art Camp?

They have the bravery to speak up about their personal experiences as well as the ways in which they deal with sexism and racism as young black girls in today’s society.

Adult women frequently lack the confidence to speak about such personal experiences.

I also learned that you can’t go into a program with the idea that you’re going to be of assistance to someone else; rather, it is a one-way relationship.

The individuals we are attempting to “serve” are capable of serving, enriching, and energizing us in a variety of ways.

Could you please elaborate?

The fact that you have advantage does not make you a terrible person; yet, dismissing the perspectives and experiences of people who are negatively impacted by your privilege is harmful.

In the case of some of the groups with which I serve, I must also be mindful of my own privileged position.

My empathy and willingness to learning from others grows as I become more conscious of my own privilege and open to learning from others.

Yoga, in my opinion, is a tool for dismantling institutional injustice.

See alsoLeadership Lab: Developing Leaders.

I agree with CJ that Chelsea loves yoga’s mission is to shine a light on voices that have been ignored.

We must all continue to invite individuals to participate in the discourse and increase the number and variety of people who are able to make decisions at the table.

As a young woman starting out in yoga, there were just a handful of other women my age and appearance with whom I could truly converse about the subject.

Because it was such a rare occurrence, it was treated as a special occasion.

There are more people who want to be heard.

As far as my personal practice is concerned, when I approached yoga from a solely physical standpoint and was performing hot yoga every day, sometimes multiple times a day, it seemed imbalanced on all levels: physically, emotionally, cognitively, and spiritually.

However, after I began to learn about many yogic systems, it became easier for me to maintain a healthy balance in my yoga practice and to accept my body.

In addition, via my work with the Yoga and Body Image Coalition, I give speeches all across the country on topics such as racism, privilege, and mindful living.

YJ: What do you think will happen next?

Our team specializes in diversity trainings for educators and yoga instructors who have a strong desire to engage with underprivileged groups.

In our training, we will be using a technique known as “restorative justice,” which is a meditation tool that is being employed in many impoverished schools, particularly in California.

In both circumstances, it is critical to generate a sense of togetherness while yet recognising the importance of individuality. For more information, see Tessa Hicks Peterson’s website: Social Justice, Yoga, and Awareness of Inequalities

Practice an energizing sequence with Chelsea, and learn how to get into her June 2015 Yoga Journal cover pose.

Mrs. Chelsea Jackson (Courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley): In 2001, I discovered hot yoga as a way to treat health issues such as high cholesterol and joint discomfort. I have been practicing yoga ever since. I then discovered Kashi, an urban, traditional yoga ashram in Atlanta in 2004, while grieving the death of my closest friend who had been killed. After learning from my instructor Swami Jaya Devi how to dive deeper into my practice and go beyond the physical, yoga became therapeutic for me.

  1. Now I teach Hatha Yoga as well as a lot of Restorative Vinyasa Flow classes to my students, which they love.
  2. A brief explanation of how the practice aided you in your therapeutic endeavors would be appreciated.
  3. In a way that welcomed it and utilized it as a tool for improving my perspective on life, yoga and meditation assisted me in approaching this horrible event that I wanted to drive out of my thoughts.
  4. YJ: At the time, you were a teacher in an elementary classroom.
  5. Because I was experiencing a great deal of stress in the classroom, I decided to teach breathing exercises.
  6. The youngsters were far more empathetic toward one another and toward themselves than they had been before this.
  7. Later, I opted to pursue a PhD in yoga integration, primarily with kids from underprivileged areas, at Emory University, which I did for the next year.

The subject of your dissertation, YJ: Could you tell me a little bit about it?

CJ: I worked with teen girls who all identified as black or African-American, but who came from a variety of educational backgrounds, including charter schools, private schools, and Title 1 schools.

Women of color write poems, and volunteer yoga teachers offer classes based on the concept of poetry.

As well as the Good Karma Awards presented by YJ, Yay!

So, what did you take away from your first year at Yoga, Literature, and Art Camp?

These young black girls had the bravery to speak up about their own experiences and how they deal with sexism and racism as young black girls in this country and throughout the world today.

The bravery to disclose such personal experiences is often lacking in adult women.

Another thing I learnt was that you can’t go into a program with the idea that you’re going to be of assistance to someone; it is a one-way path.

There are several ways in which the people we are attempting to “serve” might help us, enhance our lives, and invigorate us in return for our efforts.

How would you describe that to me.

When you dismiss the voices and experiences of people who have been harmed by your privilege, you are doing harm to yourself and to others.

In the case of some of the groups with whom I serve, I must also be mindful of my own position of privilege.

My empathy and openness to learning from others increase as I become more conscious of my privilege.

Yoga, in my opinion, is a tool for dismantling institutional injustice and promoting social justice.

In addition, see Leadership Lab: Developing Leaders.

YJ: Yes, your site, Chelsea Loves Yoga, serves as a venue for discussions on yoga, race, and privilege, as you mention in your introduction.

Moreover, it is not exclusive to minorities.

In yoga studios and yoga teacher training programs, it might be difficult to trust that you belong if you don’t see yourself reflected in the windows.

In each big newspaper where we spotted a person of color, we took note.

In the absence of a varied assortment of people engaging in self-care, it might give the message that “people like me” don’t know how to take care of themselves.

Increasingly, people are making their voices known.

See alsoThe Practice of Leadership As far as my personal practice is concerned, when I approached yoga from a solely physical standpoint and was performing hot yoga every day, sometimes multiple times a day, it seemed imbalanced on all levels: physically, emotionally, cognitively, and spiritually.

  • It was only until I began to study more about the many yogic schools that I found it easier to maintain a healthy yoga practice and accept my physical appearance.
  • Through my work with the Yoga and Body Image Coalition, I have had the opportunity to lecture all over the country about issues such as racism, privilege, and mindfulness, among other things.
  • Is there anything else?
  • A non-profit organization named Red Clay Yoga was founded by my fiancé, Shane, and myself in honor of Georgia’s red clay soil.
  • There are training courses on how to teach yoga in a culturally appropriate manner, as well as a discussion of various dispute resolution tactics.
  • As with Yoga, Literature, and Art Camp, we’ve combined yoga and restorative justice in a way that’s unique to us.

Creating unity while still appreciating individuality is critical in both situations. As well as Tesse Hick Peterson’s Social Justice, Yoga + Awareness of Inequalities, which you can read about here:

When you walk into a yoga class, do you ask yourself who’s not there? Our global ambassador Dr. Chelsea Jackson Roberts, yoga educator and co-founder of Red Clay Yoga, challenges us to do that every time we unroll our mats.

A cold September morning in New York City finds us shortly after 10 a.m. on this particular occasion. Dr. Chelsea Jackson Roberts and I are taking a stroll in Morningside Park in Harlem, which is just a few blocks from Whittier Hall, where she was a student at Columbia. Following a weeklong celebration and activities for Global Citizen Festival, a social action movement that develops material and events aimed at finding answers to many of the world’s most pressing problems, she is returning to her regular schedule.

In Chelsea’s words, “the more we support diversity in our classrooms via who is teaching and what we are teaching, the more it will begin to feed into our way of thinking about the world, our interactions with the world, and our ability to build compassion for one another.” “I urge individuals to take a class with a teacher that they believe does not have a yoga physique,” says the instructor.

See also:  Military College Uses Yoga to Prepare Students for Stress of War

When she fell “totally out of touch” with her body during her final year at Atlanta’s Spelman Institution (the oldest historically black women’s college in the United States), she claims she began practicing.

“I initially believed yoga would be a weight-loss technique, but over time I realized it was a tool for teaching me to love the body I was in,” she says.

Her employment brought with it a great deal of stress.

“I had to call on my yoga practice, and what I thought was merely exercise turned out to be quite beneficial in helping me de-stress.” Then I realized that this device is assisting me, as well as a large number of other pupils, in dealing with stress and trauma on a regular basis.” She attended a six-month yoga teacher training program on weekends, after which she incorporated the practice into her school’s curriculum, resulting in her earning a PhD in educational leadership.

Her dissertation combined her passions for yoga and education through the study of teen girls and their families in a camp-like setting that included yoga, poetry, writing, journaling, spoken word, and art—aptly named Yoga, Literature, and Art Camp—and was published in the journal Yoga and Education (YLAC).

The organization “is dedicated to reinventing and rewriting the narrative around who yoga is for and who practices yoga.” “We place a strong emphasis on girls who identify as girls of color, and we are intentional about recruiting instructors that are representative of the children who are in the space,” adds Chelsea.

I believe it is reasonable to state that, regardless of where we originate from, when we are placed in an unusual setting, it is beneficial to have some knowledge with the surroundings.

Red Clay Yoga works in communities to bring yoga to those who would otherwise be unable to access the benefits of yoga.

‘How would I be made to feel welcome in this environment?’ Chelsea demonstrates how to “take what you’ve learned and put it into practice in a real way.” “Those are the simple things that we can do to make a difference.” This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice.

If you require customized medical advice, please speak with a skilled healthcare professional.

How Peloton took a stand against racism ‘in the most unapologetic way’

NEW YORK: The day after George Floyd was murdered, Dr. Chelsea Jackson Roberts made her debut as a yoga and meditation instructor on Peloton’s platform. The Breathe In, Speak Up series, a meditation session that focuses on the value of connection, community, and togetherness, was immediately introduced by her once she joined Peloton. Jackson Roberts, who spoke on a panel at PRWeek’s virtual PRDecoded conference on Thursday, said she was hired for exactly this kind of purpose: “to show up and speak up in moments of trauma, moments of unrest, and moments of uncertainty.” Jackson Roberts is a public relations professional who lives in New York City.

  • Another panelist, Jessica Kleiman, senior vice president of global communications at Peloton, emphasized that the firm’s goal is to combat racial injustice both outside and inside the organization.
  • “We’ve also worked with organizations that are anti-racist in nature.” Even before Floyd’s death, the Peloton community recognized and supported diversity and inclusiveness.
  • The company had not, “up until that point, openly staked its claim as a brand that was devoted to social causes,” Kleiman explained.
  • Peloton “picks and selects” the instances when it feels strongly enough to speak out.
  • “While others simply want to hop on their bike or Tread and have fun while listening to pop music and doing some exercise, they are not necessarily interested in hearing someone’s opinion on what is going on in the world.

According to Kleiman, “since we have a connection with them, we feel comfortable sharing our ideas on topics that we believe are important, and if they choose to tune it out, that’s their decision.” Peloton is a connected fitness company that distributes exercise cycles, treadmills, and associated fitness subscription services.

A significant factor in the company’s success is the fact that its instructors, such as Jackson Roberts, have a strong connection with the Peloton community.

Our instructors are given the freedom to be themselves; they are not required to follow a script, they talk from the heart, pick their own music, make up their own class plans, and truly show up, according to Kleiman. “It comes over loud and clear,” says the author.

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  • A 30 minute yoga flow on May 27th at 10:00am ET
  • 10 minute yoga flow hips on May 27th at 10:00am ET
  • 20 minute slow Flow on May 27th at 10:00am ET
  • A 10 minute happiness meditation on May 27th at 10:00am ET
  • A 5 minute body scan meditation on May 27th at 10:00am ET
  • A 30 minute slow flow on May 27th at 10:00am ET
  • A 30 minute slow flow on May

The dates and times of her first live lessons have not yet been published, but keep an eye on thePeloton calendar to find out when they will be available. Interested in learning more about Chelsea? Read our earlier article from Monday, which includes some further information about her background and education. Chelsea may be found on Instagram @chelsealovesyoga and on her newinstructor Facebook page, which can be found here. Peloton is the source of this image. Want to be sure you don’t miss any Peloton news?

Sign up for our newsletter to receive all of the newest Peloton news and information.

Pelo Buddy was founded by Chris, who is also the company’s CEO.

You may find him on the leaderboard atPeloBuddy if you search for him.

Meet Chelsea Jackson, Janelle Monáe’s Yoga Instructor

Chelsea Jackson is a yogi on a mission, and she’s got a plan. When she’s not teaching R&B singer Janelle Monáe how to “do that yoga,” the Spelman College alumna is putting her Ph.D. from Emory University to good use by running a yoga, literature, and art camp for black and brown girls from underserved neighborhoods. Despite having so much on her plate, she still manages to find time to update her website, which she uses to raise awareness about racial inequities and privilege in the legal profession.

  • BCB: Can you tell me about your introduction to yoga?
  • I wasn’t quite sure what I thought about the spiritual parts of yoga at the time.
  • While in high school, I was quite athletic; yet, after I arrived to Spelman, I was unable to participate in any sports or activities of any kind.
  • I had excessive cholesterol, and there were a slew of various issues going on at the same time.
  • BCB: How did you deepen your understanding of your practice?
  • I had to say goodbye to my best buddy.
  • Yoga, in conjunction with a variety of other activities, was something that helped me to develop my spirituality, particularly in terms of learning how to be compassionate with myself during the grieving process, as I was feeling a lot of different emotions at the time.

The practice of yoga, combined with praying and meditation, was one of the things that truly helped me begin to reclaim my identity.

BCB: Your academic career has progressed since then, and you now hold a PhD with an emphasis on yoga inclusion in underprivileged populations.

CJ: I proceeded to Emory University, where I was a member of the division of educational studies.

I worked as a high school English teacher for eight years.

Not only were the challenges and experiences that the youngsters brought to the classroom, but the administration was also extremely difficult on the instructors in question.

As a result, I wanted to get away from it.

And it was at that point that I made the decision to progressively integrate and focus on breathing for 5 minutes.

I started a yoga program after school to help kids relax and unwind.

My school paid for me to go acquire an additional certification in child development, and it was at that point that I realized there was a connection between yoga and youth.

In other words, we’re talking about black and brown children, and we’re talking about children who come from neighborhoods where the vast majority of pupils live below the poverty line and get free and reduced lunches.

I opted to get a master’s degree in education.

That is one of the reasons I chose Emory.

It was truly language, literacy, and culture that I was interested in studying.

BCB: CJ: In instance, I know of one returning student to Yoga Literature and Art Camp who had a lot of concern about making friends and being in social situations before she came to the camp.

In that room with 13 other ladies, it was easier for her to come from the space of doing yoga together and then interacting, which helps her open up and get over the nervousness that comes with basic social engagement.

In their discussion, they spoke about the individual stressors that they face on a daily basis.

Unfortunately, the children with whom I’ve worked are just as stressed as the people with whom they interact.

We even undertake yoga nidra techniques like as yin yoga and restorative yoga practices, where the ladies may rest in savasanas for up to 30 minutes at a time, to help them relax.

If you are not working, you will not be successful or productive in your endeavors.

BCB: The video for Janelle Monae’s song “Do That Yoga” used you in some capacity.

CJ: We collaborate on the delivery of private yoga lessons.

After we finished our project together, she approached me and asked if I would be interested in appearing in her video.

That was something we worked on jointly.

That was a unique experience for me since it was something I had never imagined: that yoga could transport me to such remote locations.

So that was a pretty wonderful experience.

Although many people link yoga with rich white women or women who are well-off, it appears to be growing more democratized in recent years, which is intriguing.

In your opinion, how do you feel about that?

I believe that it is beneficial for us to be visible.

This is because I think about Yoga Journal, and I was just featured on the cover of the June issue of that magazine, which was like a dream come true for me because I remember calling a friend of mine who practiced yoga at the time, and any time we would go to a yoga class here in Atlanta, we were definitely the only girls of color in the room.

  • Therefore, there were a plethora of junctions that I would enter without seeing my mirror.
  • So I was delighted to get the opportunity to speak with the editors about it when they inquired about ways to increase diversity in our publications.
  • In other words, I believe that simply having more conversations about equality, not marginalizing individuals, and not making people invisible has begun to seep into the yoga community.
  • There is also historical evidence that yoga was performed in the continent of Africa before or during the period of the Indian subcontinent.
  • I believe that capitalism has the ability to revolutionize the practice of medicine with everything it puts its hands on.
  • It’s difficult for someone like myself, who started out in this field when Instagram didn’t even exist, to navigate this environment.
  • But, at the same time, I believe it is critical that we should not get ahead of ourselves and lose sight of the richness and fullness that may exist in yoga for all of us by transforming it into something that is popular or renowned only for the sake of popularity or celebrity.
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BCB: More information on the Yoga Literature and Art Camp would be appreciated.

In particular, what makes this museum so special and unusual is that it is the only museum in the world that exhibits predominantly art created by women from all throughout the African Diaspora.

They were made to feel quite welcome.

Each and every one of our instructors was an extension of them.

BCB: These days, a lot of people want to be yoga instructors.

CJ: I would say that as long as you can take a breath, you are engaged in yoga.

People are doing some crazy things that I am not sure I will ever be able to do in my lifetime.

Yoga is not a sport to be competed in.

Yoga is something that I enjoy doing since it helps me feel good about myself.

It is not our intention to be judgemental of our bodies.

I believe that in order to alter whatever it is that we are attempting to let go of, we must first meet ourselves where we are right now.

BeyondClassicallyBeautiful.com has further tales demonstrating the various beauty of African-American females.

Follow us on Instagram at @BeyondClassicallyBeautiful to stay up to date. Facebook.com/BeyondClassicallyBeautiful Follow us on Twitter @BeClassicBeauty Chelsea Jackson’s Chelsealovesyoga.com website provided all of the images.

Q&A: Chelsea Kwakye and Ore Ogunbiyi

Ruth Jackson is a woman who lives in the United States. What was your first impression of God when you were a child? Ibikunle Akintola Ogunbiyi: My aunts and grandmother gave me a large number of small Christian books when I was a young child living in England. My mother would take us to a church a little distance away. However, after relocating to Nigeria, I began attending church on a more regular basis. Church was a really cultural experience for me, but I like it. All of the tunes were fantastic.

  • I was really bashful at Sunday school, but I learned a great deal and became well-versed in biblical stories as a result of those little booklets.
  • I was attending mass at my Catholic school, I was in Nigeria visiting Anglican churches, and I was visiting Nigerian Pentecostal churches on my own time and with my friends.
  • I consider myself to be a bit of a denominational traveller, but the key thing to remember is that I have found God in all of these places, albeit in somewhat different ways.
  • O: I attended to a private boarding school when I was younger.
  • That was not my own experience.
  • The fact that there were so many other black kids, particularly Nigerian kids, with whom I could identify meant that I didn’t have the same sense of marginalization that I had had at university.
  • I realized how prominent my blackness was and how much it would impact how people perceive me and how I experience specific environments.

I attended a state school with a diverse student body.

I believe it is really vital that we have a discussion about how education is not simply a matter of public vs private.

O: For a little period of time, I attended school in Nigeria.

I believe it is worthwhile to consider the consequences of the national curriculum for countries other than the United Kingdom.

Was there a conscious or unconscious bias among your professors regarding what black kids were capable of?

While I thought myself to be an exception, I did have instructors who were pulling for me and encouraging me to go to Cambridge.

The fact that another young black boy or girl is being missed by their professors makes it impossible for me to sit back and celebrate my admission to Cambridge.

We must work hard to figure out why we believe what we believe.

The sense of being an impostor was familiar to me before to university — the constant feeling that your achievements aren’t good enough, or that another else is more deserving of this position.

Once I arrived, everything around me, including the environment, seeing people who didn’t look like me, and reading about people who didn’t have the same experiences that I did, only served to reinforce the notion that I was an outlier or that I didn’t really belong, because it isn’t considered the norm in this society.

  1. What would you say to explain it?
  2. You’ll be able to identify when someone is being racist, and you’ll be able to point to that individual and label them as such, and the job will be done.
  3. Because it has no visible face, institutional racism is nearly subtle.
  4. It will take an eternity, and it has already taken an eternity.
  5. RJ: Is there anything we can do to change this?
  6. Everyone has a certain function to do.
  7. Parents have an important role to play in preventing their children from being forced along pathways that they do not wish to go down.

The Ministry of Education should be worried about the ramifications of the national curriculum on our psyches and on our confidence as black pupils growing up in the United Kingdom, and they should take action.

I believe that as soon as the term “racist” is used, the majority of people go on the defensive, and I believe that this book just provides a chance to sit down, listen, and reflect on what we say.

All you have to do is listen in order to comprehend our situations and what we’ve gone through.

RJ: CK:Definitely.

With all of the prejudices that surround black women, I didn’t want to come out as ‘the bad one’ or overly confrontational, so I kept my voice down.

What is it about this that is so concerning to young black women?

For example, it took me some time to tell my mother that I was concerned about something and that I wasn’t feeling well.

I believe that there are occasions when you might internalize the pressure to do well, which can be detrimental. It’s also made harder by the fact that the difficulties you’re dealing with may be related to your race, and there aren’t enough black counselors to go around.

I can’t sit back and celebrate about getting into Cambridge when another young black boy or girl is being overlooked

CK:I was pretty certain that some parts had been normalized. In my opinion, I had highly arbitrary definitions of what was and wasn’t considered excellent mental health. In the past, I believe I compared it to others and concluded that “my isn’t that horrible.” That is not usual at all! I expected to be stressed, sleep-deprived, and working 14-hour days, but that is not the case at all! Universities, in my opinion, should concentrate on how to at the very least apply some principles that indicate the ideal approach to complete university while also taking care of one’s own health and wellbeing.

  • In your opinion, how do these look?
  • I believe that having safe spaces and areas that are solely for kids is essential in providing them with the closest thing to an escape from this bleak environment they can find.
  • For example, having the African Caribbean Society on campus, which Chelsea and I led in our third year, was extremely beneficial to my academic career.
  • It was a really comfortable atmosphere for us, which was just what we needed when Cambridge became too lonely.
  • O: One hundred percent.
  • During my time at Cambridge, it served as a significant source of comfort for me, and I received a great deal of support from the congregation there.
  • It was almost like another piece of my culture that I could bring with me wherever I went.
  • O: If you believe you want to accomplish something, go ahead and do it.
  • Discover what it is that you are truly enthusiastic about.
  • That is the only way you will be successful with the application.

I was completely unaware of the city’s existence. I used to research universities in general, but I never considered what it would be like to live in Cambridge. I believe this contributed to the shock.

Working At Chelsea: Employee Reviews and Culture

It is the best place to play online poker with real money in Indonesia. It has the best poker software and has the best poker support in Indonesia. Situs Judi Tembak Ikan It is the best place to play online poker with real money in Indonesia with the best poker software and the best poker support in Indonesia. Chelsea’s employees represent a remarkably diverse range of socioeconomic backgrounds. Female employees account for 51.9 percent of the company’s workforce, with ethnic minorities accounting for 40.5 percent.

It has an unusually high proportion of employees who are Democratic Party members, with 73.0 percent of its employees belonging to the party.

Chelsea has a high level of employee retention, with employees on average staying with the company for more than three years.

Paid positions at Chelsea are much lower in comparison to those at some of its highest-paying rivals, such as Azul Systems, Ali Group North America, and Salt City Candle Co., which each earn $101,269, $64,184, and $42,311, respectively.

What do people say about Chelsea

Do you have a job at Chelsea? Please feel free to share your experience anonymously. What aspects of working for Chelsea appeal to you?

Chelsea Salaries

Chelsea is where you want to be. Feel free to share your thoughts and feelings anonymously. What aspects of working at Chelsea do you enjoy the most? –

Jobs from similar companies

In the typical case, Chelsea employees are employed by the firm for 3.8 years. Employees who join Chelsea most frequently do so after they have left Walmart. Most often, after they leave Chelsea, they are hired by Walmart for their subsequent employment.

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Average Length of Employment

We determined the diversity score of organizations by taking into consideration a variety of characteristics, such as the ethnic background, gender identity, and language skills of their staff.

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Chelsea Employee Political Affiliation

Chelsea employees are most likely to be Democrats, according to the data. Patrick Pascal was the Chelsea employee that made the greatest gift to a political party in the history of the company. Patrick Pascal made a donation to the Republican Party in the amount of $21,994. Contributions to Political Campaigns by Employees

Name Job Title Party Donation
Patrick PascalPresident President Republican Party $21,994Republican Party
Ardelle CowieOwner Owner Democratic Party $17,100Democratic Party
Susan LevkoffReal Estate Administrator Real Estate Administrator Democratic Party $12,900Democratic Party
Herbert HeflichSenior Technician Specialist Senior Technician Specialist Republican Party $7,900Republican Party
Christopher CoadDoctor Doctor Democratic Party $4,500Democratic Party
Matthew ShortReal Estate Agent Real Estate Agent Democratic Party $3,700Democratic Party
Chris BlanchardOwner Owner Democratic Party $2,700Democratic Party
Frederick RuoppInvestment Counselor Investment Counselor Republican Party $2,600Republican Party
George BendaExecutive Executive Democratic Party $1,560Democratic Party
Jay LesigerOwner Owner Democratic Party $1,000Democratic Party

Chelsea Employment Videos

Manchester United – Right To Work – 1977 45rpm Tour of the Stamford Bridge and Chelsea Stadium

Chelsea Financial Performance

A number of characteristics, including revenue, longevity, and stock market success, were taken into consideration while calculating the performance score of organizations.

How Would You Rate The Company Culture Of Chelsea?

Have you ever had a job at Chelsea? By giving Chelsea a star rating, you may assist other job seekers.

Chelsea Competitors

Azul Systems, Ali Group North America, and Salt City Candle Co. are just a few of the companies that compete with Chelsea. Employees at Azul Systems make more than the majority of their competitors, with an average annual pay of $101,269, according to Payscale. Employees at Ali Group North America get an average income of $64,184 per year, while employees at Salt City Candle Co receive an average salary of $42,311 per year. Ali Group North America employees earn an average salary of $64,184. Ali Group North America is a multinational corporation headquartered in New York City.

Salary Range: $29,000 to $60,000$42,000.

Salary Range: $28,000 to $56,000$40,000 $40,177/monthSalary Range: $29,000-549,000/month$40,000/month $39,945 Carlsbad.com Salary Range: $29,000-$47,500$37,500 $37,341 Swan Salary Range: $25,000-$55,500$36,500 $35,756Bliss Salary Range: $24,000 to $49,000 $35k $34,676

Frequently Asked Questions about Chelsea

Chelsea was established in the year 1905.

How many Employees does Chelsea have?

Chelsea has a total of 25 employees.

How much money does Chelsea make?

Chelsea is responsible for $530,000 in annual income.

What industry is Chelsea in?

Currently, Chelsea works in the consumer products industry.

What type of company is Chelsea?

Chelsea is a privately held corporation.

Who are Chelsea’s competitors?

TAG, OASIS International, Paris, Azul Systems, Lancaster, Carlsbad.com, Americana, Two’s, Swan, Ridgway’s, Pf, Kim, Ali Group North America, Green Apple, Sovereign Center, Salt City Candle Co, POM, Diana’s Mexican Food, French Holdings, and Bliss are some of Chelsea’s competitors.

Where is Chelsea’s headquarters?

Chelsea’s corporate offices are in Boulder, Colorado.

What is Chelsea’s website?

Located in Boulder, Colorado, Chelsea is the company’s headquarters.

Are You An Executive, HR Leader, Or Brand Manager At Chelsea?

It is completely free and simple to claim and update your company profile on Zippia. Chelsea’s profile on Zippia provides you with an in-depth view at the company’s operations, including salary, political affiliations, personnel data, and more. This is useful information for job seekers researching Chelsea. People who have self-reported their former or present Chelsea employment have provided the information that has been used to compile the employee data. While we have taken every effort to ensure that the information on this page is accurate, Zippia is not responsible for any mistakes or omissions, or for the results produced as a consequence of using this material.

Zippia has no affiliation with or endorsement from Chelsea and its employees.

Yogic Philosophy and Anti-Racism — Embracing Equity

Lorry Henderson is a published author. When I first signed up for Embracing Identity, I assumed that I would have very little to learn about racial fairness. I was very wrong. I was brought up to be cognizant of my race. It’s true that there has never been a period in my life when I wasn’t conscious of my Blackness. It was and continues to be as prevalent in my life (in both negative and positive ways) as the breath that I take in and out of my body. When I signed up for Embracing Identity, I was particularly interested in seeing whether and how this experience would be different from other settings where I had previously participated in talks around race.

  1. Embracing Identity was accomplished about the same time as my 200-hour Power Yoga Teaching certification was completed this fall.
  2. Ironically, the Critical Action Project’s strategy is connected with the yogic ideals of vadhyaya, a Sanskrit term (from the fourth Niyama) that roughly translates to “self-study.” This is because the Critical Action Project is a self-study project.
  3. Since 2013, when I began practicing at Hotlanta Yoga, yoga has been a constant presence in my life as a background activity.
  4. Because of this, yoga has grown to be one of the most important and enjoyable components of my life.

Working on a practice that I hope to continue for the rest of my life, practicing, teaching, and developing.” As a self-proclaimed gym rat who joined up for the class expecting to get a good exercise, I was pleasantly surprised to find ninety minutes of calm and release from pain that I didn’t even realize I was experiencing.

– Lorry Henderson’s e-mail address: [email protected] ” The term “yoga” itself translates as “union” or “oneness” in several languages.

During my first few weeks of Embracing Identity, I found myself a little embarrassed when I came into the studio one day and noticed a shirt that read, “Yoga: We are all one.” Our studio, whose memberships are approximately $200 a month and where the majority of the members are white women, was a difficult sight to see the shirt.

(Listen to this episode of Yoga is Dead, hosted by Tejal Patel and Jesal Parikh, for more information on cultural appropriation in yoga).

“The critical perspective must move away from the dichotomy of ‘Is this good or bad?’ and toward the question of ‘Is this functioning or not working?’,” Abdurraquib said in the article.

If not for me, then for whom is this working? “Can I see anything of value in this?” As a result, I began my investigation with the same questions. Lorry in her yoga studio, meditating

I find most potential for yogic philosophy to align with anti-racism work within Pantjali’s Eightfold Path.

Lorry Henderson is a writer who lives in New York City. In the beginning, I thought I would have very little to learn about racial equity because I had no prior experience. I was wrong. My parents instilled in me a sense of social responsibility regarding race. It’s true that there has never been a time in my life when I wasn’t conscious of my race. As present to me (in both negative and positive ways) as the breath in my body, it was and continues to be a constant companion. In signing up for Embracing Identity, I was particularly interested in learning whether and how this experience would be different than previous opportunities for dialogue about race that I’d participated in.

It happened to be around the same time that I finished Embracing Identity that I completed my 200-Hour Power Yoga Teaching certification.

However, the Critical Action Project’s approach is aligned with the yogic principles of vadhyayama, which comes from the fourth Niyama and roughly translates to “self-study.” This is ironic because the approach to the Critical Action Project itself is aligned with the yogic principles of self-study.

Beginning in 2013, when I began practicing at Hotlanta Yoga, yoga has been a constant presence in my life.

Yogic practices have since grown to be one of the most significant and enjoyable aspects of my life.

Working on a practice that I intend to continue for the rest of my life, practicing, teaching, and refining it” As a self-proclaimed gym rat who signed up for the class expecting to get a good workout, I was pleasantly surprised to find ninety minutes of peace and relief from pain I didn’t even realize I was experiencing.

  1. Lorry Henderson is a songwriter and musician who lives in the United Kingdom.
  2. Using yogic principles, the practitioner is encouraged to engage in inner contemplation before engaging with the outside world in a mindful way.
  3. Our studio, where memberships cost nearly $200 a month and where the majority of the members are white women, was a painful sight to see the shirt.
  4. (Listen to this episode of Yoga is Dead, hosted by Tejal Patel and Jesal Parikh, for additional information on cultural appropriation in yoga).
  5. “The critical approach must move away from the binary of ‘Is this good or bad?’ and toward the question of ‘Is this working or not working?’,” Abdurraquib wrote in the article.

” If not for me, for whom is this working? ‘Does this have any significance for me?’ I started with the same questions when I started my analysis. The yoga studio of Lorry is where she works.

I’m just starting this journey and have found a great deal of joy in the fact that I’m not the only one noticing the unrealized potential in the wellness industry.

A mentoring program to help me decolonize my teaching was just offered to me and I’ve been inspired by the work of Rev. Angel Kyodo Williams, Chelsea Jackson Roberts, Lauren Ash, Julio Rivera, Tejal Patel, and Jesal Parikh of the Yoga is Dead podcast. My appreciation goes out as well to white managers and trainers who are willing to experiment with their own allyship by encouraging me to utilize my scheduled classes as a testing ground and providing me with opportunity to use the common space for affinity-based programming.

My time spent in the Embracing Identity online cohort and working on my Critical Action Project was a genuinely life-changing and therapeutic experience.

I can, on the other hand, count on one hand the number of times I’ve participated in responsible debates about race in a way that didn’t require me to put my own well-being at risk for the sake of white people.

More significantly, Embracing Equity provided me with the option and freedom to personalize it!

A lifelong learner, she is enthusiastic about creating learning environments that prepare students for lives of meaning, financial stability, and genuine control over their own lives in the future.

She presently resides in Cambridge.

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