Sweet Spuds and Pumpkins

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes with Pumpkin and Sage.

Observe the badges on your profile.

I dub myself theThanksgivingqueen.

I like the chaos of the week leading up to the feast, when I have to pull everything together to make it, well, come together. And then really putting it together. It’s the lifeblood of my existence. It is something I look forward to throughout the year. While this dish really screams Friendsgiving rather than Thanksgiving for us (my family can’t live without the classics, you know? ), it could perfectly be the centerpiece of your Thanksgiving meal today as well! Alternatively, you might serve it as a side dish to your supper.

Eddie, on the other hand, is not so sure.

  1. Which is sort of amusing given he “doesn’t like” pumpkin in the first place.
  2. Oh, my God.
  3. Crispy sage and butter, as well as nutmeg and cheese, are baked into the smooth and creamy sweet potatoes inside, which has just a slight trace of pumpkin flavoring.
  4. Concerning the cheese.
  5. Both are quite delicious and enhance the flavor of the potatoes tremendously.
  6. That crispy, crunchy skin has always been a favorite of mine.

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes with Pumpkin

4 to 6 people can be served using this recipe. Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 1 hour and 15 minutes Time allotted: 1hr30mins Using crispy sage and pumpkin puree, these twice-baked sweet potatoes are a delicious side dish! They are quite delicious when topped with cheese and cooked until the cheese is melty.

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 handful fresh sage (about 15 to 20 leaves)
  • 12 cup pumpkin puree
  • 12 teaspoon salt
  • 12 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 34 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese (I like a parm-cheddar mix, like Sartori Montemori or Trader Joe’s unexpected cheddar)
  • 4 medium sweet potatoes
  • The oven should be preheated at 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Make a few holes in the sweet potatoes with a fork to allow the steam to escape. Place the potatoes on a baking sheet and bake until they are soft, 45 to 60 minutes. While the potatoes are baking, melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat while the potatoes are baking. Add the sage leaves and fry for 1 to 2 minutes, or until they are barely crispy, before removing them with kitchen tongs and transferring them to a paper towel. Allow the potatoes to cool for a few minutes before slicing them along the center lengthwise. Take a gentle scoop out of the sweet potato flesh, leaving the skin on so you may fill it later
  • Put the sweet potato in the bowl of an electric mixer and blend until smooth. The texture of this pudding is smooth and fluffy, and it can be made with a fork, but I like it to be whipped in a mixer. Season with salt and pepper, then stir in the pumpkin puree, half of the crispy sage leaves, and the entire stick of butter. Half of the cheese mixture should be added now. Mix on a medium speed until the mixture is smooth and well blended
  • Spoon the mixture back into the sweet potato shells. The remaining cheese should be sprinkled on top. 15 to 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are heated through and the cheese has melted, should be enough time. Remove the potatoes from the oven and scatter the remaining sage leaves on top of the potatoes. Serve

Served as an appetizer and a side dish, with American cuisine. It has a comforting taste to it.

Sweet Potato, Pumpkin and Apple Puree Recipe

  • 1 pound sweet potatoes that have been washed
  • 1 pound pumpkin that has had the seeds removed apples with a tart flavor, such as Granny Smith or Braeburn
  • 2 teaspoons lime juice
  • 5 tablespoons plain Greek-style yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • A pinch of salt
  • A pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
Nutritional analysis per serving (8 servings)
  • 138 calories
  • 4 grams of fat
  • 2 grams of saturated fat
  • 0 grams of trans fat
  • 1 gram of monounsaturated fat
  • 0 grams of polyunsaturated fat
  • 25 grams of carbs
  • 3 grams of dietary fiber
  • 12 grams of sugars
  • 3 grams of protein
  • 75 milligrams sodium Please keep in mind that the information displayed is Edamam’s best guess based on the ingredients and preparation provided. However, it should not be viewed as a substitute for the advise of a qualified nutritionist.

Preparation

  1. 400 degrees Fahrenheit should be set for the oven. Sweet potatoes should be scrubbed and pierced numerous times with a sharp knife before cooking. Several holes should be poked into the apples. Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with aluminum foil and lightly oiling it, then layering the potatoes, pumpkin (cut side down), and apples on top. Baking time is 30 to 40 minutes, or until a knife can easily be inserted directly to the core of the apples (it’s okay if the skins pop off the apples or if they collapse), and the pumpkin is mushy. Remove the pumpkin and apples from the oven and set them aside. Continue to bake the sweet potatoes until they are completely mushy and beginning to drip, which may take 15 minutes or longer depending on their size. Immediately remove them from the fire and let them aside to cool until you can handle them comfortably
  2. Reduce the temperature of the oven to 350 degrees. Potatoes and pumpkin should be peeled and skinned before cooking. Apples should be peeled and cored, with any apple meat that sticks to the skin being scraped away. Everything should be chopped finely before being placed in a food processor fitted with a steel blade. Puree until the mixture is smooth. Blend in the rest of the ingredients until everything is well-combined. Transfer the puree to a 2-quart baking dish that has been lightly oiled
  3. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, or until the puree is steaming. Serve when still heated.

Tip

  • 400 degrees Fahrenheit is the temperature in the oven. Sweet potatoes should be well scrubbed and pierced numerous times with a sharp knife. A few small punctures should be made in the apples. Lay down the potatoes, pumpkin (cut side down), and apples on top of a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil and gently oiled. For a soft pumpkin and apples, bake them for 30 to 40 minutes, or until a knife can easily be inserted directly to the core of the apples (it is okay if the skin pops off the apples or if they collapse), and the pumpkin is soft. Take the pumpkin and apples out of the oven and set them on a serving platter. Bake for another 15 to 20 minutes, or until the sweet potatoes are completely cooked and starting to ooze, depending on their size. Immediately remove them from the fire and let them aside to cool until they are easily handled
  • Reduce the temperature of the oven to 350°F. Potatoes and pumpkin should have their peels removed. Using a small scraper, remove any apple meat that has adhered to the skin of the apples. Peel and core the apples. Toss everything into a food processor equipped with a steel blade and pulse until everything is roughly chopped up. Puree until the mixture is completely smooth and homogeneous. Blend in the rest of the ingredients until everything is well-combined and uniform. Cook for 20 minutes at 350 degrees, or until the puree is steaming, in a 2-quart baking dish that has been gently greased with butter. Warm the dish before serving.

Fall Nutrition Faceoff: Pumpkin vs. Sweet Potato

Every fall dinner gathering has the age-old argument about who will bring the pie this year. Some families swear by pumpkin, while others favor the naturally sweet sweet potato as a healthy alternative. It doesn’t matter which you choose to eat; they’re both bright orange, sweet, and wonderful. So, what exactly is the big deal? For those who are health-conscious or simply want scientific evidence to support their decisions in the kitchen, there is a nutritional winner among these two hearty autumn classics.

Examine their capabilities and determine which one is the ultimate nutrition champion in this video series.

First, what kind of foodaresweet potatoes and pumpkins, anyway?

In a farmers’ market, you may see a layer of dirt caked onto the stacks of sweet potatoes as you go through the aisles. It should come as no surprise that these dark-orange tubes are really root vegetables. Pumpkins, on the other hand, are a little more vague when it comes to determining where they belong in the categorization hierarchy. In fact, according to Jerlyn Jones, an R.D.N. in Atlanta, “a pumpkin is technically a fruit since it is a result of the seed-bearing structure of flowering plants,” she explains.

The culinary comparison between a pumpkin and a sweet potato is significantly closer than the one between a pumpkin and an apple or a pear.

How the pumpkin vs. sweet potato health benefits shake out

When you take a closer look at both cuisines, you’ll discover that while you can’t go wrong with either, one has a little advantage.

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Reducing the risk of chronic disease

A high concentration of beta-carotene (the yellow-orange pigment that gives fruits and vegetables their brilliant color) can be found in both pumpkins and sweet potatoes, making them excellent sources of vitamin A. Aside from its attractive hue, this carotenoid is a potent antioxidant with a wide range of health advantages. ‘A diet high in beta-carotene-containing foods may lower the chance of getting some forms of cancer and may also provide protection against heart disease,’ says Jones. In addition to providing protection against various illnesses, beta-carotene also helps to slow the aging process in some ways.

The beta-carotene content of the vivid orange sweet potato is likewise quite high.

Sweet potato was crowned the victor.

Immunity-boosting vitamins

Speaking of vitamin A, both sweet potatoes and pumpkin are high in antioxidants, which can aid to increase your immunity and fight off infections. “One cup of cooked pumpkin contains 245 percent of the recommended daily intake (RDI) of vitamin A and 19 percent of the recommended daily intake (RDI) of vitamin C,” according to Jones. Sweet potato, on the other hand, outperforms pumpkin in terms of nutritional value, with one cup supplying 774 percent of vitamin A and 53 percent of vitamin C. Sweet potato (again!) is the winner.

Gut health

As Jones adds, “good amounts of fiber help to maintain a healthy gut flora while also improving bowel health.” The use of sweet potatoes can assist in meeting the necessary fibre intake in a country where just 5 percent of the population does. As a vegetable, sweet potatoes provide a significant amount of fiber, compared to pumpkin, which has only 3 grams. One cup of sweet potatoes offers 8.2 grams of fiber. High fiber diets are also related with a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, hypertension, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some malignancies, in addition to a healthier gut.

Winner: Sweet potato (are you sensing a pattern here?)

How do the rest of their nutrients stand up?

Although these traditional pie fillings appear to be identical, they are vastly different in terms of nutritional value. Potassium has the same amount in both. Potassium is an important element that aids in muscle contraction and helps maintain appropriate blood pressure. However, when pumpkin is removed from its native pie environment, it has a far lower sugar content than sweet potatoes (a victory for pumpkin!). However, while sweet potatoes have more calories than regular potatoes, this is due to the fact that they contain higher levels of carbs, protein, and lipids (all necessary parts of your diet).

When it came to the pumpkin and sweet potato statistics, we turned to the USDA’s National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference.

The final result: Sweet potato wins!

The fact of the matter is, though, that both of these delicious fall classics are excellent alternatives. When faced with a choice between two veggies, it’s virtually difficult to make a mistake. Each vegetable has an own nutritional profile, but at the end of the day, your body will always be satisfied if you give it something that was grown in the ground in the first place. Sweet potato, on the other hand, outperforms pumpkin in terms of nutritional value when compared side by side, and this is true for everything from vitamin A to fiber to protein content.

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Pumpkin Shaped Roasted Sweet Potatoes [Vegan]

2 years have passed since

Pumpkin Shaped Roasted Sweet Potatoes

2 years have passed since Roasted sweet potatoes in the shape of pumpkins are simple and tasty, and they require just a few ingredients. This dish is especially good for youngsters, but it can also be easily dressed up for an autumn evening dinner party with a few additions.

Pumpkin Shaped Roasted Sweet Potatoes

  • Sweet potatoes, preferably large and with a thicker skin all around (the thicker the skin around, the better for forms)
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Preparing a baking sheet or parchment paper ahead of time will help to prevent sticking. Sweet potatoes should be peeled and sliced into 1/2 inch thick rounds. Shape the rounds into a pumpkin shape, adding a stem and trimming the bottom of the pumpkin using a paring knife or tiny pumpkin-shaped cookie cutter if you have one. Similar to how actual pumpkins are varied and unique, each of them will be as well. In a large mixing basin, carefully toss the sweet potatoes in the form of pumpkins with the olive oil, salt, and pepper
  2. Place the sweet potatoes on a baking sheet, making sure they are fairly spaced apart. Optional: Sprinkle a little amount of cayenne pepper on top of the grownup pumpkins to give them a kick of flavor. 30 minutes, or until a fork can easily be inserted into the sweet potatoes.

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About The Author

See My Recipes for further information. The author Wendy Irene is a yoga teacher and Reiki Master who is also a meditation guide, a tree hugger, and a foodie who believes in the importance of holistic wellbeing. She works with people to help them rediscover their pleasure and connect with their intuition. Her blogs Give Love Create Happiness and Park and City were started by Wendy, who is also the founder of the company.

Sweet Potato Pumpkin Casserole

One of the most popular Thanksgiving side dishes, Sweet Potato Pumpkin Casserole, has been improved to become even more delicious. This year, I’m getting a head start on my preparations for Thanksgiving. That begins with making certain that I have some very outstanding recipes to share with you! So far, I’ve published recipes for both classic and innovative Thanksgiving dishes, including Perfect Roast Turkey Breast, handmade dinner rolls (both my grandmother’s recipe and a make-ahead version), French Sweet Potato Soufflé, Perfect Cranberry Sauce, and Pumpkin Creme Brulee.

  1. Rather than serving sweet potatoes and pumpkin separately, I’ve combined the two ingredients in this very tasty Sweet Potato Pumpkin Casserole.
  2. As a result, traditional pumpkin pie will not be served on Thanksgiving Day at my house.
  3. The only way I could possibly take a few bits of pumpkin pie if one were to show up at our gathering was by covering the entire thing with whipped cream.
  4. Therefore, the notion of using canned pumpkin in my sweet potato casserole was quite appealing to me.
  5. And it’s very delicious!

I’m not sure how to express the difference in flavor that occurs with the addition of pumpkin to the sweet potatoes, but I definitely suggest it. Another thing I particularly appreciate about this casserole is that it has a good ratio of topping to filling, which I think you will enjoy as well.

Tips for Sweet Potato Pumpkin Casserole:

  • Preparing this casserole in the microwave is the most time-efficient method of getting it ready to bake in the oven. Using tinned sweet potatoes is a good option if you are pressed for time. Make certain you get pure pumpkin rather than pumpkin pie filling. This side dish may be prepared one day ahead of time
  • Simply put the filling and topping in a baking dish and cover securely with plastic wrap to store in the refrigerator
  • Then bake according to package directions on the day you intend to serve it. This casserole was prepared in a plate that looked similar to this one.

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Sweet Potato Pumpkin Casserole

One of the most popular Thanksgiving side dishes, Sweet Potato Pumpkin Casserole, has been improved to become even more delicious. Preparation time: 15 minutes Preparation time: 45 minutes 1 hour is the whole time allotted. Servings 12Calories190kcal

  • 4 pounds sweet potatoes
  • 115 ounce can pure pumpkin
  • 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 4 tablespoons butter melted
  • 1 large egg beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup light brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 tablespoons butter melted
  • Pinch of salt
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare a casserole dish by greasing it and setting it aside
  2. Peel the sweet potatoes and chop them into pieces that are 2 to 3 inches in length. Place the sweet potatoes in a microwave-safe dish that has been covered with aluminum foil. The sweet potatoes should be cooked in the microwave for 15 to 18 minutes, or until they are fork-tender. Halfway through the cooking time, turn off the microwave and mix the potatoes again. Sweet potatoes should be mashed with a potato masher. Filling: Combine the mashed sweet potatoes, pumpkin, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 4 tablespoons melted butter, 1 beaten egg, vanilla, pumpkin pie spice and salt in a large mixing bowl until well combined. Mix well to ensure that the mixture is completely combined
  3. In a second dish, whisk together the remaining 1/3 cup brown sugar, the flour, the pecans, and a pinch of salt until well combined. Using a fork, combine the ingredients. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of melted butter and mix well. To blend, thoroughly mix the ingredients. Pour the sweet potato and pumpkin mixture into the casserole dish that has been prepared and spread evenly. Sprinkle the pecan topping over the filling in an equal layer. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes uncovered at 350°F.
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Nutritional Values Sweet Potato and Pumpkin CasseroleAmount Per Serving Calories190* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Sweet Potato and Pumpkin Casserole

More Thanksgiving Recipes:

  • Dietary Guidelines Sweet Potato Pumpkin CasseroleAmount Per Serving Calories190* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000-calorie diet. Sweet Potato Pumpkin Casserole

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7 Cozy Recipes With Pumpkin and Sweet Potato

Shepherd’s Pie with Autumn Sweet Potatoes Photograph courtesy of Angela Sackett Superhotmama You can’t get enough of the flavors of autumn in your life? We can’t do it either! That’s why we’ve compiled a list of our favorite dishes that include both pumpkin and sweet potato. Combining two of the season’s most flavorful components results in a double autumnal taste sensation.

This selection of pumpkin and sweet potato dishes will provide you with warm and inviting ideas that everyone will like. Prepare to make the most of your fall harvest, which includes anything from breads to soups.

Pumpkin Sweet Potato Bread

A Shepherd’s Pie with Autumn Sweet Potatoes Angela Sackett provided the photography. Superhotmama Not getting enough of the season’s aromas and flavors? We are unable to do so either. We created a list of our favorite pumpkin and sweet potato recipes to help you get started. A double autumnal sensation may be had by combining two of the season’s most delicious delicacies. This collection of pumpkin and sweet potato recipes includes warm and inviting dishes that everyone will enjoy. Prepare to make the most of your fall haul with recipes ranging from breads to soups.

Roasted Veggie Buddha Bowl

Buddha Bowl with Roasted Veggies France C., the recipe’s originator, describes the dish as follows: “Roasted vegetables and sautéed tempeh are stacked on top of bulgur and drizzled with an orange-curry vinaigrette.”

Autumn Sweet Potato Shepherd’s Pie

Buddha Bowl of Roasted Veggies In the words of recipe developer France C., “Roasted vegetables and sautéed tempeh are layered on top of bulgur and drizzled with an orange-curry vinaigrette.”

Pumpkin, Sweet Potato, Leek and Coconut Milk Soup

Soup with pumpkin, sweet potatoes, leeks, and coconut milk Only six ingredients are needed to make this silky soup, which includes vegetable oil, an onion, a leek, pumpkin and sweet potatoes, vegetable broth, and coconut milk.

Puerto Rican Mondongo

Mondongo de Puerto Rico is a kind of monkey found in Puerto Rico. This nutritious and filling soup, cooked with beef tripe, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin, is the perfect chilly-weather supper option for the whole family.

Orange Vegetables Soup

Soup with Orange Vegetables (Credit: SunnyByrd Fall-inspired pumpkin butternut squash soup, made with just orange-colored vegetables and squash (pumpkin, butternut squash, carrots, and sweet potatoes), will fill your home with the scent of autumn. Advertisement Advertisement

Roasted Pumpkin with Root Vegetables and Broccoli

Roasted Pumpkin with Root Vegetables and Broccoli is a delicious fall dish. Image courtesy of lyudka Serve these roasted vegetables as a side dish or as the main course of a vegetarian dinner. “The seasoning combination provides a little heat and sweetness,” says KSchirm13, the person who created the dish.

More Inspiration

Recipe for Chef John’s Chicken a la KingImage courtesy of Chef John

Friends: Sweet Potato Stuffed Pumpkin

Friends: Stuffed Sweet Potatoes in a Pumpkin Rachel: Oh, that’s right. Sorry, but Tag won’t be able to make it; his girlfriend has arrived in town, and he will be spending Thanksgiving with her. Monica:Oh! Why didn’t you inform me about this? I created a sweet potato stuffed pumpkin for him to enjoy on his own. Rachel:Well, I was planning on it, but then I thought, you know, you know. You can never have too many of those pumpkin things since your cuisine is so wonderful and well prepared.

Friends, Season 7

When I think of Thanksgiving, I can’t help but think of the popular television sitcom Friends. Thanksgiving episodes from the show were some of my favorite episodes from the series, and I recall watching them with my siblings when I was a kid. The first in this series is Monica’s sweet potato filled pumpkins from season 7, which will be followed by other Thanksgiving dishes from Friends in the near future. The game they were playing with the 50 states was the most memorable portion of the program for me.

These stuffed pumpkins are too cute to resist!

You may prepare things ahead of time in order to save time on Thanksgiving day. Simply reheat the pumpkins in the oven until they are warm, then cook the sweet potato over a bain marie until it is warm.

Friends: Sweet Potato Stuffed Pumpkin

Equipment: Ingredients:

  • 8-ounce bag of frozen sweet potatoes (clean)
  • 4 tiny pumpkins (munchkins or other comparable size)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 pound 6 ounces 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 4oz / 1/2 cup heavy cream

Pecan crumble is a dessert made with pecans.

  • 1/4 cup – all-purpose flour
  • 2 tbsp – brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon – sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3 tbsp – cold unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup pecans, finely chopped
  • 1.5oz / 40g / 1/4 cup – all-purpose flour

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Prick the sweet potatoes all over with a fork once they have been washed. Bake the sweet potatoes for 45 minutes, or until they are completely cooked through, on a sheet pan coated with parchment paper. Allow it to cool completely before peeling off the skin
  2. Slice the tops off the pumpkins with a very sharp knife to remove the seeds. Using some of the tougher pumpkins, I had to cut them with a saw. Just remember to use extreme caution! Scoop out the centers of the pumpkins and gently brush with 2 tablespoons of melted butter before baking. Bake for 15 minutes at 400F until aromatic, while seasoning it with salt and roasting it with the pumpkin top
  3. While the sweet potatoes are cooling, cook the cream and two tablespoons of butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring constantly, until hot. Combine the peeled sweet potatoes, cinnamon, nutmeg, cream, butter, salt, and pepper in a food processor and pulse until smooth. Pour the sweet potato into the prepped pumpkins when you’re ready to serve it, or keep them warm in a warm water bath while you’re preparing the rest of the meal. To create the pecan crumble, preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit and combine all of the ingredients in an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment until well combined. Mix on a medium speed until the mixture has the consistency of crumbles. Pour the crumble onto a sheet pan and bake for 10 minutes at 375 degrees Fahrenheit, or until the crumble is golden. Using crumble, decorate the tops of each of the pumpkins and serve them warm.
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Pumpkin VS Sweet Potato – How To Choose Between Them

400 degrees Fahrenheit should be set for the oven. Prick the sweet potatoes all over with a fork once they have been thoroughly washed. Bake the sweet potatoes for 45 minutes or until they are completely cooked through on a sheet pan coated with parchment paper. Allow the pumpkins to cool completely before removing the skins. Cut the tops off using a very sharp knife to make them more manageable. Some of the tougher pumpkins required the use of a saw. Be extremely cautious, though. 2 tbsp of melted butter should be brushed lightly across the inside of the pumpkins after scooping out the center.

Using a food processor, puree the peeled sweet potatoes together with the cinnamon, nutmeg, cream, butter, salt, and pepper until smooth.

To create the pecan crumble, preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit and combine all of the ingredients in an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment until thoroughly combined.

Using a sheet pan, spread the crumble out and bake for 10 minutes at 375 degrees Fahrenheit, or until golden brown.

Pumpkin vs sweet potato

In average, pumpkins have fewer calories and carbs than sweet potatoes, but sweet potatoes produce more usable meat per pound of vegetable compared to pumpkins do. Sweet potatoes and carrots are both abundant in beta carotene and have comparable aromas, but sweet potatoes tend to come out on top in any dispute. Their ability to be used in both savory and sweet recipes has something to do with their versatility and deliciousness. One factor that contributes to this is the high fiber content of pumpkins, at least when compared to other vegetables.

Now, let’s take a deeper look at all of these distinctions, as well as certain parallels, to ensure that you understand both pumpkins and sweet potatoes completely.

Sweet potatoes are higher in calories, more nutritious

Sweet potatoes are often regarded as superior than normal potatoes, despite the fact that they have a higher sugar content. Sweet potatoes appear to be superior to pumpkins in terms of fiber, carbs, and total calories, according to the USDA. Sweet potatoes are superior even on a lower scale of micronutrients. Whereas 100 grams of raw sweet potatoes have 30 milligrams of calcium, the same quantity of pumpkin has just 21 milligrams of calcium. Sweet potatoes provide double the amount of vitamin A found in pumpkins.

What causes pumpkins to lag behind in terms of production is primarily down to the amount of water they have available.

Cucumbers, squash, zucchini, and watermelon are all members of the same family, which includes cucumbers. Furthermore, when the water content is high, the fruit or vegetable is juicy, but there is less area for nutrients, both large and little, to be found.

Pumpkins are only half as sweet as sweet potatoes

Surprisingly, pumpkins aren’t the more delicious of the two! No, we didn’t anticipate them to win by a wide margin, but it turns out that sweet potatoes are significantly sweeter. 100 grams of raw sweet potato has 4.2 grams of sugar, which is little more than 4 percent of the recommended daily intake. 100 grams of raw pumpkin, on the other hand, contain only 2.7 grams of sugar, or 2.7 percent of the total sugar content. You would think this is strange considering how sweet pumpkin pie and roasted pumpkin are, but it is not.

But, have you ever tried roasted sweet potato with bacon?

When it comes to pumpkin pie, the mix that is used for pumpkin pie usually contains some sugar, so you can’t rate it only on that basis.

You get more bang for your buck with sweet potatoes

It is rare that you will use the entire sweet potato when purchasing a pound of sweet potatoes. The skins are the only item that you are unable to utilize. The seeds of a pumpkin are edible in both their raw and roasted forms. It is not possible to consume the skin of a pumpkin, and roasting it results in a lot of liquid that is not utilized. So, in summary, when you require a pound of sweet potato, you know you can use virtually the entire potato, with the exception of the skin, to make your dish.

Pumpkins are native to North America

You should be aware that pumpkins are native to North America, which includes the northern portion of Mexico, if the origin of each vegetable or fruit on your table is important to you. In reality, pumpkins and squash played an important role in indigenous culture and gastronomy. As a result of its ability to withstand long periods of storage, winter squash (which includes pumpkins) is particularly well recognized for providing food over the winter months. Despite the fact that sweet potatoes are native to tropical portions of the American continent, the exact location of their origin is still up for question.

Additionally, see: Pumpkin vs.

Pumpkin and sweet potato similarities

Despite all of their distinctions, sweet potatoes and pumpkins share a great deal in common as well as differences. They’re so similar in their usage and flavor that many aren’t sure which one to select when they first see them.

Both can be used for savory or sweet dishes

Whatever you’re preparing, if it can be done with sweet potatoes, it will almost certainly work with pumpkin. Sweet potatoes and regular potatoes both get quite mushy and end up with a similar texture, and sweet potatoes retain a significant amount of their boiling liquid. If you ever run out of pumpkin and are in desperate need of anything to use as a pie filling, sweet potato will work just as well with the same ingredients and flavor as regular potato.

Pumpkins, on the other hand, may be used in savory recipes such as cream soup, casserole, or as a vegetable side dish.

Their flavors are incredibly similar

Both pumpkin and sweet potato have a flavor that is so close to one another that they are easy to confuse one for the other unless you have a highly educated palate. To be sure, pumpkins have a flavor that is reminiscent of cucumbers and zucchini, but it isn’t saying much. However, if you use the same seasonings on both pumpkin and sweet potatoes, you won’t be able to tell the difference. They’re not only tasty in their own right, but they’re also quite similar. Sweet potatoes, on the other hand, are sweeter.

Sweet potatoes and pumpkins have roughly the same season

When it comes to flavor, both pumpkin and sweet potato are so similar to one another that they’re simple to confuse one for the other unless you have a highly educated palate. For the most part, pumpkins taste similar to cucumbers and zucchini in terms of flavor, although they’re not quite as sweet. You won’t be able to tell the difference if you use the same ingredients on both pumpkin and sweet potatoes. They’re not only adorable in their own right, but they’re also quite similar. On the other hand, sweet potatoes are tastier.

Is sweet potato the same as pumpkin?

Both pumpkin and sweet potato have a flavor that is so close to one another that they are easy to confuse one for the other unless you have a trained taste bud. True, pumpkins have a flavor that is reminiscent of cucumbers and zucchini, but this is a good thing. However, if you use the same seasonings on both pumpkin and sweet potatoes, you will not be able to tell the difference. Not only that, but they’re both pretty darned cute in their own way. Sweet potatoes, on the other hand, are more sweet.

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