The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthly Reflections of Bahauddin, Father of Rumi by Coleman Barks and John Moyne

The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthy Reflections of Bahauddin, the Father of Rumi: Barks, Coleman, Moyne, John: 9780060750633: Amazon.com: Books

Educator, lecturer, and author Max Strom has worked all over the world to help people improve their lives. Max’s groundbreaking interdisciplinary technique, ‘Inner Axis,’ incorporates breath-based yoga movement as an intrinsic aspect of the practice. “There Is No App for Happiness,” his latest book, explores the difficulty of finding purpose in today’s digital era, which is something we can all relate to. The opportunity to reconnect with Max and learn more about his life, his practice of yoga, and his profession was a pleasant surprise.

I reached a watershed moment when I began to practice Hatha yoga, which improved my overall health and helped me sleep better at night.

In a symbolic sense, my practice has assisted me in taking off the armor that I had been wearing.

My 20s and early 30s were a point in my life when I didn’t weep for more than 10 years, and this was the first time since childhood.

  1. Everything in my body was shut off, even my mind.
  2. My eyes well up with tears now that I’ve become used to it.
  3. In a sense, I was an archaeologist in that I discovered it.
  4. My priorities evolved as a result of this experience.
  5. To put it another way, I didn’t require anything to make me feel alive, other than my own body.
  6. The great thing is that when you open your heart, it doesn’t just open for you; it opens for everyone on the planet to see and experience it.
  7. Even though everyone claims to desire closeness, no one is interested in looking directly into your gaze.

The feeling you get when you see someone in the eyes and you are completely present with them.

Strength.

Healing In Triyoga London, your Inner Axis lessons have just started off.

Axis is a multidisciplinary, long-term life practice that focuses on lowering stress, anxiety, and insomnia in a direct and effective manner.

Incorporating breath-based yoga movement and mindfulness, Inner Axis sessions are available at a variety of levels to fit the needs of all students.

It is certain that you will feel better after only 10 minutes, and that by the conclusion of class you will be more calm and clear-headed than you have been for a long time.

For what reason do you believe it is so important to our yoga practice and daily lives?

Whenever you become enraged, you appear enraged.

Angry feelings begin to surface in your body.

Experiencing emotions is a bodily sensation.

That is incredible because when you are a teenager, there is so much tension in your life and so much emotion.

We aren’t like that at all!

In order to liberate the heart from the past and to free it from its own prison, which we construct for ourselves, breathing practices must be used.

In different portions of our bodies, we retain different emotions.

Grief frequently results in a lack of inspiration, and the reverse is true as well.

Loss of breath is an outward manifestation of bereavement.

When we say we are filled with spirit, we are referring to the Latin word inspiritus.

It’s almost as if you’re an archaeologist, excavating your own heart from beneath your own skin.

Consequently, the breathing exercises eliminate the armour that has been put around the heart, allowing it to open completely.

So, what recommendations would you provide to someone who wants to begin a digital detox right now?

There is evidence that our society, particularly young people, are developing symptoms associated with excessive use of social media, text messaging, and gaming.

It’s only now that we realize our spirits are yearning for connection and meaningful purpose, which comes as a complete surprise to us.

Since ninety percent of our communication is nonverbal, it follows that if we speak solely through text, we are only employing ten percent of our communication capacity in that conversation.

As a result of our current information technology, there is a lot of good that can be accomplished; nevertheless, we must determine if the electronic equipment I just purchased is helping me to have more free time or stealing more of it away from me from time to time.

Though I am enthusiastic and entertained, is being entertained the same as being happy or having a sense of purpose in one’s life?

Even if it’s not incorrect, is there something else I could be doing that would be more significant, more relevant in this situation?

Moreover, if I’m feeling lonely, I should probably get off the Internet and go somewhere where people are really engaging with one another, rather than just sitting about gazing at their cellphones, which aren’t particularly sensible by the way (seems obvious, doesn’t it?

To live a genuine and meaningful life, what advise would you give?

Most people desire greater health and more purpose in their lives, but some of us want to feel more empowered in our own lives.

Once we have discovered it, we must work to further develop it since it provides us with the greatest sense of purpose and the most chances to pursue.

For example, instead of saying: “God, I’ve spent half my life blowing up imaginary warships!,” say: That period is gone forever, and my life has come to an end as a result.

Convene a meeting with your trusted colleagues and ask them for their advice.

Due to your travel itinerary, you will be traveling internationally.

My days in hotels, or the days in between when I am not teaching but need to remain in the region, are the only times I have the opportunity to get in some serious practice.

For example, after an 18-hour day of travel, I strive to accomplish at least three tasks in as little time as possible.

2 Back bend with a bolster under the heart for support The relaxation response may be triggered by breathing patterns for 310 minutes.

Considering how many individuals have tried yoga, I believe there should be three times as many people practicing it as there now are.

Gender prejudice is also prevalent in many of these establishments.

They merely take a few steps back and gaze at their feet.

This will allow individuals from all walks of life, all genders, all religions, and atheists to feel welcomed and at ease.

I believe I would have to answer that the bombardment of the digital and social media worlds is the most difficult for me to maintain a sense of balance while.

Coming returning to 15000 unanswered emails and other unfinished business is a daunting prospect, but I am determined to find a way to bring everything together.

Would you have any suggestions for other instructors who are interested in doing this, and how would you go about creating a timetable that does not result in burnout?

Anyone who works more than that will get burnout.

Avoiding teaching all over town and on an illogical schedule is one of the most important tactics for increasing your class attendance, which in turn raises your revenue in most circumstances.

Consequently, if you teach at 9 o’clock in the morning on a Monday, you should also teach at 9 o’clock in the morning on Wednesday and Friday mornings, in addition to a weekend session, in the same manner.

Most timetables, on the other hand, are not put up in this manner by accident.

In what location do you like teaching the most and why?

All across the world, there are locations like this.

What’s the finest piece of advise you’ve ever received from someone else. You must make the best of the situation you are in given your circumstances. A letter from President Theodore Roosevelt (although he did not personally deliver this to me).

Top reviews from other countries

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product For all students of philosophy or spiritual searchers, this book is a must-read. On November 11, 2011, a review was published in the United Kingdom. Purchase that has been verified For all students of philosophy or spiritual searchers, this book is a must-read. The concepts provided in this book have the potential to be life-changing. It comes highly recommended. As is customary for Mr. Barks, his work is simply remarkable. 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Having a wonderful experience On November 6, 2019, a review was published in Canada.

  1. This is a wonderfully gorgeous book, a masterpiece among the great poets of the twentieth century.
  2. When it comes to the book, if there is one thing that stands out, it is the fact that it makes you feel.
  3. The words in this book are more than just words; they are expressions.
  4. If you want to FEEL anything, read this book.

Amazon.com: The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthy Reflections of Bahauddin, the Father of Rumi eBook : Barks, Coleman, Moyne, John: Books

Added to the database on December 29, 2012, verified purchase in the United States As an integral element of the Sufi mystics library collection, this book is a valuable resource for anyone who wish to perceive the Muslim heritage in a more favorable light than they have previously. On May 17, 2020, a review will be conducted in the United States. This is not Rumi’s style. True Rumian poetry vastly outweighs the simplicity of this guy, who has made a career out of whitewashing its language, culture, and poetry in order to further his own financial interests.

  1. This is a great translation of a writing that is transcendentally lovely.
  2. Reviewed on September 7, 2012 in the United States of America What a thing of beauty.
  3. On September 17, 2006, a review was conducted in the United States.
  4. Towards the same vein as all of Coleman Barks’ notes, the ones in the back get right to the heart of the topic in the customary serpentine, raconteuring fashion.
  5. On January 12, 2007, a review was conducted in the United States.
  6. A visionary father of a visionary writes poetry, but perhaps not in the formulaic meaning that is generally associated with the term; rather, his various thoughts convey provocatively basic insights into the human condition from a visionary father of a visionary.
  7. On January 6, 2010, a review was conducted in the United States.
  8. It is appropriate for folks with little or no prior knowledge of Rumi.
  9. Very re-readable, fairly cheap, and indelible in your memory.

For the third time in a row, Coleman Barks has written a brilliantly uplifting book that we may read in the morning, while traveling, or when we have forgotten how great God is. If you enjoy his Rumi-related novels, you will enjoy this one as well.

Top reviews from other countries

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product For all students of philosophy or spiritual searchers, this book is a must-read. On November 11, 2011, a review was published in the United Kingdom. Purchase that has been verified For all students of philosophy or spiritual searchers, this book is a must-read. The concepts provided in this book have the potential to be life-changing. It comes highly recommended. As is customary for Mr. Barks, his work is simply remarkable. 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Having a wonderful experience On November 6, 2019, a review was published in Canada.

  1. This is a wonderfully gorgeous book, a masterpiece among the great poets of the twentieth century.
  2. When it comes to the book, if there is one thing that stands out, it is the fact that it makes you feel.
  3. The words in this book are more than just words; they are expressions.
  4. If you want to FEEL anything, read this book.
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The Drowned Book

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We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. If you find any errors in this preview of The Drowned Bookby Bahauddin, please let us know. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. · 15 customer reviews and 81 ratings Begin your examination of In The Drowned Book, the Father of Rumi shares his ecstatic and earthy reflections on life. This was an enjoyable book, but it was not Rumi. From an author who has no qualms about confessing his yearning for a lady of nice curvaceous body, it is an intriguing combination of spirituality with a heavy dose of earthiness.

  • It’s a whole different experience.
  • It received an excellent rating.
  • But his father’s book was more like a memoir and a how-to guide wrapped into one.
  • It’s highly intimate and touches on every part of his life, including his family.
  • 09th of July, 2019 It was not well received by Bambinorated.
  • Barks’s previous tragedy into this post (The Essential Rumi).
  • My review, in contrast to the most of what I write, is really appropriate: we’re dealing about some very serious crap here.

Coleman Barks should be ashamed of himself for allowing it to be promoted in this manner.

The library stretched her large, multicolored hand towards me, displaying this book in the process (1997 edition).

Barks tragedy into this post (The Essential Rumi).

My review, in contrast to the most of what I write, is really appropriate: we’re dealing about some very serious crap here.

Coleman Barks should be ashamed of himself for allowing it to be promoted in this manner.

The library stretched her large, multicolored hand towards me, displaying this book in the process (1997 edition).

Now that I’ve returned home, I’ve decided to take the book by the jugular.

My expectations were met by the poetry’ wisdom and wit, as well as the same profound, fresh and easygoing idea of holy that I had discovered in Sufi stories.

As a result, I devoured the first few pages in delight.

Some poems began to perplex me, and many others began to disappoint me – it was as if each poem was trying to go in too many directions at the same time, and I became disoriented.

But I continued going because, every now and again, one of the poems would provide me with just what I needed.

in the course of my studies I uncovered a book that followed the same pattern as this one.

Bahauddin (Rumi’s father) is the author; Coleman Barks is the translator.

This book, on the other hand, was more attentive to the entire issue I’m attempting to address – it included a disclaimer regarding the translation.

Moyne finished translating from Persian, Mr.

Barks was allowed to have.

Barks’ version (which is listed as the second translation in the book!) is as follows: Glasswork may take on a variety of forms.

Sama should have an elegant variety of music and poetry, just as he should have an exquisite variety of food.

Even Galland would consider this level of translation flexibility to be overly generous.

In addition, according to what I’ve read about The Essential Rumi, the same uninhibited “translation” approach was used to create it.

My own personal activity has been to create poetry from literal translations of Chinese poems, which I have done several times.

That would be incredibly dishonest, just as it would be incorrect to promote my inventions as chinese poetry.

Rumi’s writings is translated into English by John Moyne, and the poems in this book are free-form lyrical ramblings by Coleman Barks over the top of the translations.

Occasionally, in this world of ours, culture is the only worthwhile and secure rock in the midst of a vast and deadly sea of garbage and financial lunacy.

It is possible that someone will drown.

Barks and Mr.

However, to go through with the editorial ruse of characterizing this as Rumi’s work is completely unacceptable.

08th of December, 2020 Cep Subhan KM is an acronym for Cep Subhan KM.

A wonderful book written by Rumi’s father.

Unfortunately, I was unable to locate any additional editions of the same text.

I appreciate the book, but I despise the fact that it is not the whole edition, but rather a selection from the complete edition.

13th of March, 2015 Gregrated it and thought it was excellent.

My interest was piqued by the idea that he had written ecstatic poetry of his own, since I had always assumed that Rumi’s inspiration came from Shams and his own insights and was completely ignorant that he also had a father influence.

This waking state, dreaming, dreamless sleep, and a fourth mode with no name that, in its pure beingness, includes all of the other states, are all possible.

My interest was piqued by the idea that he had written ecstatic poetry of his own, since I had always assumed that Rumi’s inspiration came from Shams and his own insights and was completely ignorant that he also had a father influence.

This waking state, dreaming, dreamless sleep, and a fourth mode with no name that, in its pure beingness, contains all of the other states in itself are all possible states to be in when awake.

I have been drawn to the transcendence, the vast freedom, and the alternate reality that Rumi’s visionary poetry embodies.

Rather plainer, less euphoric, more practical, presumptuous, deadpan, and wacky in tone.

Bahauddin’s is more like a garden toolshed that doubles as a makeshift meditation chamber; it is both unusual and authentic in its design and function.

“The Importance of What Dies and the Magnificence of the Unmanifest” — Friedrich Nietzsche “You can’t have two foundations at the same time.

‘Motion and Stillness’ – “I say this to myself alone: when you are crushed, people around you appear to be crushed as well.

If you are in pain, even the luxuries that are brought to you will cause you more pain.

As I was doing this, a number of observations occurred to me.

In addition, there are locations where demons attack individuals like packs of dogs and other places where the impacts are more angelic and helpful, which was the second point made.

We should be cautious around wealthy individuals.

It is not a tangible manifestation.

In the desert, a tent has been built up so that God might come and visit you.

“Your soul is more valuable than whatever you have ever lost.” (79) See my previous reviews by clicking here!

I began by reading Rumi’s “The Book of Love,” but soon realized that I needed something a bit less esoteric, a little less lyrical, a little less convoluted to get through the day.

Throughout the book, Bahauddin quotes extensively from the Quran (which I am absolutely unfamiliar with), yet his writing style is easy to follow.

I began by reading Rumi’s “The Book of Love,” but soon realized that I needed something a bit less esoteric, a little less lyrical, a little less convoluted to get through the day.

Bahauddin draws heavily on the Quran (which I am absolutely unfamiliar with), and his writing style is straightforward and straightforward.

If you are at all interested in Rumi, you should read this.

It is something I would suggest to anyone who is looking for spiritual depth.

It’s a nice touch that the Maarif’s page numbers have been included.

3rd of January, 2009 It was incredible how Peterated it.

His funny and perceptive pieces (such as those in Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture Manifesto) have made Chuck Klosterman well-known.

“Thus, each individual knows you in the context of what has transpired in their life, including the losses as well as immense delight.” — 5 people like this “1:315-316 SENTENCES WITH WHITE-BIRD CONTENTS Large white birds, much larger than geese, were flying over the sky in my dream.

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I was able to decipher the bird’s communication.

My interpretation of this dream is that it is urging me to be thankful in my waking life, no matter what happens, and to remember that there are a hundred thousand different ways to express gratitude.

It is from the place where Moses and Jesus are standing with the other friends of God that the praise that we give to God originates.

With its mouth open wide, it dragged my entire head inside it and curled its lips in arcs around my forehead, chin, and the sides of my skull.

It had the potential to consume my entire body.

Then there was peace.

Then there came the dream when I was eating salty cuisine.

A salty taste remained in my tongue when I awoke.

The universes collide with one another.

The appearance of the angel Gabriel, who takes Muhammad away in a second, should come as no surprise to anybody.

There is a vast secret hidden between the phrases supreme and commanded.

Try to trace the origin of one object that has ever come into your possession.

Assume for a moment that you have been blind since birth and that you have never seen this world or understood any of its significance.” — 4 people like this More quotations. Thank you for returning. For the moment, please wait while we sign you in to YourGoodreading Account.

The Drowned Book

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We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. If you find any errors in this preview of The Drowned Book by Coleman Barks, please let us know. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. Begin your examination of The Drowned Book is a collection of Bahauddin’s euphoric and earthy observations, who is considered the father of Rumi. Coleman Barks is a poet from the United States. Despite the fact that he admits to have no command of the Persian language, he is internationally famous as a translator of Rumi and other Persian mystic poets.

  1. A regular international performer, he is well-known throughout the Middle East for his wit and wisdom.
  2. Coleman Barks is a poet from the United States.
  3. Barks spent more than three decades as a literary professor at the University of Georgia.
  4. Rumi’s popularity in the English-speaking world has soared as a result of Barks’s work, which has helped to build an incredibly large fanbase.
  5. In 2006, Coleman Barks was awarded an honorary doctorate by Tehran University.
  6. Some people are lucky enough to fall in love.
  7. Every month, our crew goes through the piles.
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The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthy Reflections of Bahauddin, the Father of Rumi

English0061882488 The Sufi Master and Rumi’s Father’s Previously Unpublished Writings Rumi’s father, Bahauddin, was not only a great influence in the development of Islamic mysticism, but he was also a profoundly important factor in his son’s life as a poet and philosopher. Throughout this work, which is the first comprehensive English translation of a brilliant but completely forgotten book, Bahauddin demonstrates that he is a daring and spiritual genius. John Moyne’s Persian translations are transformed into new spiritual literature by the lovely and passionate art of Coleman Barks, who gives him a voice via his delightful and passionate creativity.

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ISBN-13: 9780061882487
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 10/13/2009
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 192
File size: 582 KB

About the Author

A renowned poet and popular author, Coleman Barks’ works include The Essential Rumi, RUMI: The Big Red Book, The Soul of Rumi, RUMI: The Book of Love, and The Drowned Book, among other works. Both of Bill Moyers’ PBS television programs on poetry, The Language of Life andFooling with Words, featured him prominently in their respective episodes.

He spent thirty years as an English and poetry professor at the University of Georgia, and he now concentrates on writing, readings, and performances as a hobby.

Read an Excerpt

Reflections of Bahauddin, the Father of Rumi, that are both ecstatic and earthy in nature Barks and Coleman are authors of this work.

HarperSanFrancisco

0060591943 (ISBN: 0060591943) BLUE ROBE NUMBER 23 Demonstrate the correct path. According to the Qur’an (1:6) 24 I’ve been given a taste of what is truly wonderful in this world. The gates open as though milk were coursing through my system. i’m dressed in a blue, six-direction woven robe with watercolor pictures flowing over the material, including a thousand different sorts of flowers, yellow jasmine, and wild iris. Beautiful orchard corridors and gorgeous faces on the street make up my makeup.

  • ONE OF THE MANNERS IN WHICH GOD TASTES In the midst of prayer, I was reminded of the nymphs of heaven, who are believed to be half-camphor, half-saffron, and with hair that smells like pure musk, which I had forgotten about.
  • Then I thought of God’s characteristics: compassion, charity, beautiful complexity, brilliant knowledge, mercy, and beauty, among others.
  • I see a long table with a tablecloth stretched across it.
  • God fills my yearning and my spirit with the flavor of those traits, even when I am not aware of it.
  • Continues.
  • With permission, I’ve included an excerpt.
  • The publisher has granted permission for this excerpt to be copied or republished in its entirety without written permission from the author.

Customer Reviews

The Sufi Master and Rumi’s Father’s Previously Unpublished Writings Rumi’s father, Bahauddin, was not only a great influence in the development of Islamic mysticism, but he was also a profoundly important factor in his son’s life as a poet and philosopher. Throughout this work, which is the first comprehensive English translation of a brilliant but completely forgotten book, Bahauddin demonstrates that he is a daring and spiritual genius. John Moyne’s Persian translations are transformed into new spiritual literature by the lovely and passionate art of Coleman Barks, who gives him a voice via his delightful and passionate creativity.

  1. a little about the author: A renowned poet and popular author, Coleman Barks’ works include The Essential Rumi, RUMI: The Big Red Book, The Soul of Rumi, RUMI: The Book of Love, and The Drowned Book, among other works.
  2. He spent thirty years as an English and poetry professor at the University of Georgia, and he now concentrates on writing, readings, and performances as a hobby.
  3. Bahauddin’s writing in The Drowned Bookis reminiscent of Sei Shonagon’sPillow Book, and it is a miscellany that shows Bahauddin jumping from gardening tips to meditations on Qur’anic verses to quasi-erotic explorations of the Sufi’s efforts to find unity with God.
  4. Some of Bahauddin’s poetry is featured (for example, “Why say fall is the end of loving?
  5. Readers who are interested in the Sufism that underlies Rumi’s poetry will find plenty to love in this collection.

John GreenCopyright American Library Association is a trademark of the American Library Association. All intellectual property rights are retained. The section titled “About this title” may refer to a different edition of this title.

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The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthy Reflections of Bahauddin, the Father of Rumi (Paperback)

C. Coleman Barks, J. Moyne & Co. Published by HarperCollins Publishers Inc. in the United States in 2005 under ISBN 10: 0060750634. 9780060750633 is the ISBN for this book. NewPaperback Number of pieces: 1 Book DescriptionPaperback. Publisher: Random House, Inc. Condition: New. This is a reprinted edition. The language used is English. This is a brand new book. The Sufi Master and Rumi’s Father’s Previously Unpublished Writings Rumi’s father, Bahauddin, was not only a great influence in the development of Islamic mysticism, but he was also a profoundly important factor in his son’s life as a poet and philosopher.

John Moyne’s Persian translations are transformed into new spiritual literature by the lovely and passionate art of Coleman Barks, who gives him a voice via his delightful and passionate creativity.

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The book is in excellent / near-perfect condition. If the book originally came with a dust jacket, it will be included. The text will be free of markings, and the pages will be sharp. Every order is backed by a 100% satisfaction guarantee. DROWNED BOOK: THE ECSTATIC AND EARTHY REFLECTIONS OF BAHAUDDIN, THE FATHER OF RUMI DESCRIPTION: Coleman Barks and John Moyne’s book is available in hardcover. **Excellent Condition**

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  • Dr. Coleman Barks is a brilliant scholar in every way! The epitome of a scholar in every sense of the word. Thank you very much, Dr. Barks! Yes|Condition: Pre-owned|Purchased with verification
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The Drowned Book

Rumi’s father, Bahauddin, was not only a key force in the development of Islamic mysticism, but he was also a significant influence on his son’s life. This wonderful and interesting anthology displays the profundity of thirteenth-century Sufi mystical insight, as well as its incisive observations of nature, people, and the secrets of life, in a lyrical and provocative style. Bahauddin’s annotations, which are full of wit and intelligence, let the reader gain a better appreciation of his son Rumi’s spiritual and intellectual legacy.

  • Rumi carried the Maarif everywhere he went after his father’s death.
  • Shams abruptly stops the dialogue and tosses the priceless manuscript into the sea, breaking the spell.
  • “Who are you and why are you doing this?” Rumi protests.
  • However, if you prefer, we may obtain the book for you.
  • See?” “Dry,” he says as he takes Bahauddin’s notepad out of his pocket.

Rumi’s life and work are brought to life for the first time in English.

The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthy Reflections of Bahauddin, the Father of Rumi. San Francisco, HarperSanFrancisco, 2004, xli + 149 p.

1 Coleman Barks, an American poet, originally collaborated with John Moyne (Javd Mo’n), an emeritus professor of linguistics and computer science at the University of California, Berkeley, in the early 1980s to make translations of the poetry of Jalal al-Din Rma. Barks has built a phenomenally successful career over the past two decades by “translating” or “versioning” Rma, collaborating with Moyne (who works from the Persian) and others (some of whom work from existing Turkish translations of the Persian), and occasionally re-working the existing scholarly translations of Nicholson and Arberry, all without ever learning Persian himself.

Moyne first “selects and translates excerpts from Bahauddin’s Persian prose into English with some explanatory notes, interpretations, and minimal changes to make the archaic language and theological terms understandable to general English-speaking readers” before “translating excerpts from Bahauddin’s Persian prose into English with some explanatory notes, interpretations, and minimal changes to make the archaic language and theological terms understandable to general English-speaking readers Afterwards, Barks engages in a “second translation,” in which he attempts to “feel something like a presence moving among the visuals and thoughts.” Ideally, this process of “mystical play” is performed “not via the mind, but through an emptiness in the soul” and a “attunement with other presences,” and it is acknowledged to be “not scholastic study” (xxix).

Exemplifications of Moyne’s “literal translation” in contrast to Barks’ end version chronicle the technique on pages xxvii to xxxviii.

A short section of impressionistic, “freewheeling” (3n23) commentary by Barks follows the English excerpts, which are each given a thematic heading.

The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthy Reflections of Bahauddin, the Father of Rumi. San Francisco, HarperSanFrancisco, 2004, xli + 149 p.

1 Collaboration between American poet Coleman Barks and John Moyne (Javd Mo’n), emeritus professor of linguistics and computer science at Harvard University, began in the early 1980s with a project that resulted in a series of translations of the poetry of Jalal al-Din Rma. Barks has built a phenomenally successful career over the past two decades by “translating” or “versioning” Rma, collaborating with Moyne (who works from the Persian) and others (some of whom work from existing Turkish translations of the Persian), and occasionally re-working the existing scholarly translations of Nicholson and Arberry.

2 The approach used for the current book, which contains extracts from the Ma’refof Rm’s father, Bah’ al-Din Valad, does not result in “a word-for-word, ‘faithful’ translation” (xxix), and so renders the work inappropriate for scholarly purposes.

Example passages illustrating the technique (xxx-xxxii) are taken from Moyne’s “literal translation” and compared to Barks’ final version.

The introduction is perhaps the most academic presentation A short amount of impressionistic, “freewheeling” (3n23) commentary by Barks follows the English extracts, which are each given a thematic heading and contribute to the material from Bah’ al-Din that has already been translated by Arberry (133-48).

The Drowned Book: Ecstatic and Earthy Reflections of Bahauddin, the Fa.

Authors: Moyne, JohnBarks, Coleman
Publisher: HarperOne
BISAC/Subject: REL037000,REL090000,POE013000,LCO012000
ISBN: 9780061882487,Related ISBNs:0061882488, 9780060750633, 9780061882487
Classification: Non-Fiction
Number of pages: 192,
Audience: General/trade

The Lost Words of the Sufi Master and Father of Rumi, as told by Rumi himself Rumi’s father, Bahauddin, was not only a great influence in the development of Islamic mysticism, but he was also a profoundly important factor in his son’s life as a poet and philosopher. Throughout this work, which is the first comprehensive English translation of a brilliant but completely forgotten book, Bahauddin demonstrates that he is a daring and spiritual genius. John Moyne’s Persian translations are transformed into new spiritual literature by the lovely and passionate art of Coleman Barks, who gives him a voice via his delightful and passionate creativity.

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The Drowned Book by Coleman Barks, Bahauddin , John Moyne

Rumi’s father, Bahauddin Valad (1152-1231), was a prominent spiritual poet and seer who lived in the 13th century. In Konya, he was renowned as the “King of Learned Men, Sultan of Mystical Knowing,” as well as other titles. As the incomparable Coleman Barks and Persian scholar John Moyne lead us on a fascinating excursion into God’s presence in this great soul’s life, this is the first time that crucial portions from the Maarif, his spiritual diary, have ever been translated into English. With its fecund collection of visionary insights, questions and responses, conversations with God, commentary on passages from the Quran, short stories, bits of poetry, sudden revelations, medical advice, gardening hints, dream records, jokes, erotic episodes and speculations of all kinds, the authors describe this volume as a “mystical compost heap.” A great deal has been said on desire, grace, mystery, attentiveness, gratitude, joy, and imagination in the work of this much renowned and respected Persian spiritual master.

To paraphrase, “Bahauddin comes before us as a multidimensional traffic junction, not as poet, though he is known for his wild paragraphs, nor as coherent theologian, though he is known for being a dazzling igniter of images in the cave of the unknowable,” as Barks and Moyne put it.

Throughout this imaginative novel, Bahauddin prays for his wishes to grow and deepen, and these prayers are interspersed throughout the text.

“I go to your door to pass the time while I’m waiting.

Please accept this homage, and please maintain my body lively with new sorts of favors as well as the old favorites, as requested in a five-fold prayer.” The following passage takes him a step farther down this path: “My attention is drawn to the fact that every portion of my body, as well as my consciousness, is prepared to receive each of these cravings.

They are given to you as a present.

And being in the presence of a gorgeous woman gives me enormous pleasure.

I have been true to my word, and the path to pleasure and contentment has opened up for me.

Some people have absolutely nothing in common with one another.

The world I see is much more lovely and delightful than the one we are used to seeing and accepting in our daily lives.

This demonstrates that I have been blessed with a more delectable existence than those who dwell around me.

“The road of the heart,” Rumi’s father believes, cannot be simply articulated with words or concepts: “When questioned about the essence of love, I don’t have anything to answer.

Talking about love distorts the true meaning of the word.

It’s a mystery that continues to unfold.

Take pleasure in it in your spirit, your heart, and your character.

However, this will not be accomplished by speaking.” Another aspect of life with mystery is that one does not prepare for the future, but rather that one is continually in a state of gratitude to God.

Disappear into the earth, leaving no trace, as a tree begins to grow, its branches reaching blindly towards the air in its naïve faith.

It is seen as the wellspring of thriving; engaging in inner work with people in whom we have faith is the way by which we might stretch our wings.

“That presence can manifest itself in a variety of ways, including a natural calamity, heightened awareness, or something more subtle.

He goes on to give the following advice: “Maintain your focus on your own inner world, and avoid seeking out other people’s companionship as much as possible if you find yourself drifting away from your own world.

Be as demanding as you want.

Pay attention to those who are terribly desirous of God.

Throughout this spiritual notebook, you’ll find a wealth of information on traveling down the mystical road of the heart.

Rumi’s father considered himself to be a wild-madman-lover, and he undoubtedly passed on that trait to his son, as well. In order to whet our appetites for desire, mystery, and grace, we shall happily return to this amazing Sufi commonplace book again and time again.

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