The Proven Healing Power of Compassion

The Proven Healing Power of Compassion

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At its essence, compassion is a gift of the spirit—one with the power to change lives.

Love. Empathy. It is a deeply felt desire to assist others who are in need. Compassion is a profound awareness of the pain of others, accompanied by a desire to alleviate that suffering for them. “Compassion has absolutely nothing to do with any self-interest or expectation,” says the author. The San Francisco Integral Yoga Institute’s head, Swami Ramananda, describes it as “a virtue or a manner of caring for another person that is anchored in spiritual knowledge.” It’s no surprise that scientists are becoming increasingly intrigued by this inborn human tendency to feel compassion for others, and for good reason: In both the giving and receiving situations, compassion has been demonstrated to have significant and measurable impacts, ranging from lower levels of stress and despair to speedier recovery from surgery.

A rising field of compassion research is bridging the gap between science and contemplative traditions in order to better understand how and why we care for others.

A therapist and senior instructor at Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, Margaret Cullen, believes compassion may be seen of as both a characteristic of the heart and a talent that can be learned.

As you get closer to it, it becomes more readily available to you.

Joanna Macy is a fashion designer.

Research Confirms Giving Makes Us Feel Good

You are already aware of how it feels wonderful to give—how making a donation to a cause that you believe in or purchasing a lunch for a homeless person can make your entire day brighter. Now, there’s real science to explain why doing nice things may have such an uplifting effect on one’s attitude. People who give generously have their brains scanned, and it has been discovered that generous acts stimulate the same reward areas in the brain that pleasures such as food and sex do. In response to stimulation of these regions, dopamine and other feel-good neurotransmitters are produced, resulting in pleasant sensations that can vary from contentment to euphoria in the individual.

Post, director of the Stony Brook University Medical School Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care & Bioethics, and author of The Hidden Gifts of Helping puts it: “The mechanism of biology explains what spiritual traditions have been teaching for a very long time.” “Sex, excellent food, and the ability to give to others are all essential for human flourishing.” It stimulates the portion of the brain that is responsible for happiness.” An international team of researchers, led by Michael Norton, a professor of business administration at Harvard University, evaluated data on the purchasing patterns of more than 200,000 people from 136 countries, representing a diverse spectrum of socioeconomic backgrounds, back in 2010.

In their research, the researchers discovered that spending money on others made people happy regardless of their cultural background or socioeconomic status.

Larger presents are not always associated with more enjoyment.

“People frequently believe that we are proposing that they give away all of their money,” Norton adds.

“We think of it more as small adjustments in your expenditure on a day-to-day basis, such as purchasing a cup of coffee for a buddy,” says the author. Even if you don’t accomplish the large things, you can make a difference by finding small ways to incorporate donating into your daily routine.”

Learn How to Open Up for Others

According to Emiliana Simon-Thomas, a consulting neuroscientist with Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, which is spearheading groundbreaking research on compassion, “compassion comes from being moved by another person’s suffering.” “Compassion comes from being moved by another person’s suffering,” says Simon-Thomas. The inclination, she explains, has been detected in infants as early as one year old and is a natural reaction, according to study. However, while it may come naturally, the capacity to open our hearts and interact with others is not always simple, particularly when they are suffering.

The Compassion Cultivation Training program, which runs for nine weeks, uses meditation techniques adapted from various contemplative traditions—such as tonglen, a Tibetan Buddhist practice in which you imagine breathing in another’s suffering while sending out love and kindness as you exhale—to teach students how to nourish their compassionate instincts and to regulate their emotions in order to be able to feel another’s pain without becoming overwhelmed by it.

The usefulness of the training is being investigated by a team at Stanford, and preliminary results indicate that it is beneficial in generating compassionate sentiments.

“You’re more likely to get a much deeper understanding of your own well-being and to have more success in your interpersonal relationships,” she adds.

See also: How to Cultivate Compassion for more information.

How to Open and Connect to Your Heart

Despite the fact that compassion is a natural trait, you might lose touch with it when your intellect is divorced from your heart, according to Swami Ramananda of the Integral Yoga Institute in California. You can embrace and accept all elements of yourself as well as the people in your life when you are in your heart. However, while you are preoccupied with the thinking mind, you are more likely to perceive other people as barriers to your objectives rather than as fellow travelers on the journey.

  • Ramananda recommends the following practice: Comfortably position yourself and take several calm breaths.
  • Make a fist and place your hands over your heart if you desire.
  • Keep thinking about that individual and feeling their presence in your heart.
  • Afterwards, for a few minutes, try redirecting that same loving energy inward and focusing it toward yourself.
  • If you find yourself having critical thoughts or feeling unworthy, allow loving energy to flow toward yourself, accepting yourself just as you are.
  • What is so beautiful about the heart is that it has the ability to accept and welcome everything.
  • Use a word or phrase that represents your aim for this exercise and keep it in mind as you go about your day.

“I am breathing through my heart,” or “Let me breathe through my heart,” are examples of phrases you can tell yourself. See also 7 Techniques to Live Your Dreams: Be Your Own Life Coach for more information.

Put Compassion Into Action

One out of every five Americans volunteers their time for charitable causes, and with good reason: According to a 2010 survey of 4,500 individuals, 89 percent reported increased well-being as a result of volunteering, 73 percent reported lower stress levels, and 68 percent reported feeling healthier as a result of volunteering. This study is the most recent example of a growing corpus of research that suggests that voluntarily helping others may lower anxiety and sadness, hasten recovery from sickness, reduce pain, assist older persons in remaining mobility, and extend longevity in a variety of situations.

  • But what if you’re overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of volunteer opportunities available and don’t know where to begin?
  • Investigate opportunities to volunteer at your neighborhood school, church, or other community groups for simple ways to contribute, and think outside the box about how you can use many of the things you already do to help others.
  • If you have excess compost, you might donate it to a local community garden while you’re there and remove some weeds.
  • Participating in a local clean-up day in your neighborhood park, beach, or riverbank will allow you to spend quality time with your family.

The Healing Power of Compassion

For a variety of reasons, one in every five Americans volunteers their time in their community. After volunteering, according to a survey conducted in 2010, 4500 persons stated they felt better about themselves, 73 percent said their stress levels had decreased, and 68 percent said they felt healthier as a result of their participation. This study is the most recent example of a growing corpus of research that suggests that voluntarily helping others may lower anxiety and sadness, hasten recovery from sickness, reduce pain, assist older persons in remaining mobility, and extend longevity in a variety of circumstances.

  1. The question is what to do if you are overwhelmed by the sheer amount of volunteer opportunities available and are unsure of where to start.
  2. Investigate opportunities to volunteer at your neighborhood school, church, or other community groups for simple ways to contribute, and be inventive in how you may use many of the things you currently do to help others.
  3. If you have excess compost, you may donate it to a local community garden while you’re there.
  4. Taking part in a community clean-up day in your local park, beach, or riverfront will allow you to spend quality time with your family.

“Begin with something that is within your reach and work your way up to something more difficult to achieve.” Additionally, seeFinding Your Purpose Using Shraddha and Dharma

Cultivating a Compassionate Response

My first interaction with the practice of confronting suffering with compassion occurred many years ago, when I worked as an intern at a center for survivors of domestic abuse. Because the women I encountered lived in a hostile, aggressive, and at times deadly environment, I gained a tremendous lot of insight into the experience of acute pain. When I first started, I was completely overwhelmed by the prospect of learning how to assist individuals in dealing with life-threatening and unpleasant events while being impartial.

  1. It triggered strong sentiments of powerlessness, frustration, and condemnation in me.
  2. This was a reflexive response as I attempted to alleviate the agony (both of theirs and mine), and guess what?
  3. It just served to exacerbate my own feelings of powerlessness, rather than creating the supportive, caring environment that is necessary for healing and empowerment to take place.
  4. For me, this meant releasing control and being there with their sorrow, as well as my own, rather than attempting to manipulate the situation.

Opening Heart and Mind Helps Connect and Heal

My first interaction with the practice of confronting suffering with compassion occurred many years ago, while working as an intern at a center for survivors of domestic abuse in New York City. Because the ladies I met lived in a hostile, aggressive, and at times deadly atmosphere, I gained a tremendous lot of insight into the experience of acute pain. The thought of learning how to assist individuals in dealing with life-threatening and traumatic circumstances while being objective was overwhelming at first.

Helplessness, irritation, and judgment were all triggered as a result of this experience.

When I was attempting to alleviate the suffering (both of theirs and mine), I reacted in a reactionary manner, and guess what?

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In fact, it just served to exacerbate my own emotions of powerlessness, rather than creating the supportive, caring environment that is necessary for healing and self-empowerment.

For me, this meant releasing control and being present with their sorrow, as well as my own, rather than attempting to change the result. A learning experience that has continued to benefit me in both my professional and personal lives.

What Gets in the Way of Compassion

Pain will be experienced by all of us as we move through life. It might occur as a result of the death of a loved one, the dissolution of a relationship, or the recovery from a serious illness. Alternatively, it might be the insignificant things that trigger emotions of humiliation, inadequacy, or worthlessness. When this happens, we have a propensity to become caught up in our own judgment; we beat ourselves or others in an attempt to alleviate the discomfort. This just serves to increase the severity of our pain.

The compassion with which we turn towards pain aids our healing and allows us to re-connect with life.

The Practice of Compassion

When teaching individuals how to change reactivity into a compassionate and loving reaction, I use the example of an injured kid or a sick pet to assist them master the skill. I inquire as to how they would assist a youngster who is depressed or a cat that is in distress. What would the tone of that response be like? A hug and comforting words or a soft touch are frequently what they say they would provide to the child or pet. When we are in pain, compassion is our most basic need; it is compassion that allows us to recover.

This turning towards suffering, with an open heart and the goal to heal, is what allows us to experience life to the fullest extent possible.

Developing Self-Compassion

Making ourselves aware of when we are responding or evaluating ourselves in any manner is the first step in being more mindful. The second stage is to become aware of how our bodies, thoughts, and hearts are reacting to the experience of suffering and to become present with them. Setting an intention to be nice to ourselves and to let go of our reactionary tendencies is what allows us to connect with compassion and feel empathy. To begin creating a caring and compassionate practice, consider the actions listed below.

  1. The first step is to become aware of the problem! Pay attention to when you get reactive or triggered. When you experience reactivity, your body sends messages to your brain. The hands or body may tense up as blood rushes to the face or when muscles tense up in the arms. It’s possible that your breathing is shallow and that your thoughts are full with judgment
  2. Connect with the present moment by letting go of your ideas and concentrating on the sensation of your breath as it enters and exits your body, or by concentrating on the sensation of the earth beneath your feet. This aids in reducing reactivity and calming the nervous system. Put your palm over your heart to express your recognition of the struggle you are experiencing at this time. Spot your palm on your heart and imagine that you are symbolically opening your heart to compassion and mending the hurting place inside you. Try imagining yourself being hugged or enveloped by a spiritual figure or someone who cares about you. Relax and allow yourself to be enveloped by the healing sense of compassion until you begin to feel calmer and more connected to the present moment.

A significant act of compassion occurs when we allow ourselves to care for ourselves and others. It replenishes the heart, energizes the body, and provides nourishment for the spirit. We understand the great healing power of compassion in that moment of opening our hearts to ourselves and others, and we re-connect with life and love. May you be rid of all pain and sorrow. May the kindness of the universe flood your heart. Cindy Ricardo, LMHC, CIRT, therapist in Coral Springs, FL, has copyright protection for 2012.

Source:

The Power of Compassion

Compassion is a term that is frequently heard in counseling, yoga, and other forms of mindful practice. The phrase, or notion, is one of those phrases or concepts that, as an idea, sounds warm and wonderful but, in practice, is remote and out of reach for many of us. It’s a fact that deep Compassion possesses enormous power: only a few seconds spent in genuine Compassion may have dramatic effects on our entire physique, as well as on our thoughts and interpersonal interactions. Professor of Neurosurgery at Stanford University, Dr.

  • Doty, says that compassion is actually our more natural and inherent condition, and that it has a healing influence on our physical and mental well-being.
  • In other words, your stress reactions will be reduced, and the functioning of your body will be restored to a healthy state.
  • So, what is it about compassion that makes it so tough for so many of us?
  • Compassion has been associated with complacency in some way.
  • According to the Dalai Lama, becoming enraged at anything just adds to our own suffering and makes our anguish greater.
  • This is not helpful.
  • Many of us are trapped in this cycle of fear and judgment, and we have not yet learned to trust via an encounter with compassion.

It has the appearance of a comfortable blanket, yet it is the workhorse of emotional well-being.

Maybe you relaxed, maybe you shed a few tears of relief, and a little bit of the anguish was replaced with a sense of peace and tenderness.

Just a few days ago, I received some terrible news, which left me feeling depressed.

As I absorbed in her kindness, I felt my shoulders relax, my heart expand, and my entire self soften in harmony.

They were simply there.

Increased compassion did not fix the practical problem, but it did allow me to feel more at peace and comfortable inside myself, which made a significant difference in how I was able to re-approach it.

There is a plethora of studies available regarding what occurs within our bodies when we experience compassion, but in a nutshell, we feel more protected, we relax, and we are better able to think rationally and make decisions as a result of our experiences.

One of the key reasons we seek counseling is to experience genuine compassion.

We want someone who is able to see past our actions and into our intentions, as well as into what we are yearning for and what we are in need of. Compassion itself has the ability to heal.

The Healing Power of Compassionate Purpose Online Class

Throughout this installment of The Science of Compassionseries, health psychologist Kelly McGonigal encourages you to consider the many ways in which genuinely caring for others can be a source of meaning and courage for you, as well as a source of support as you navigate difficult experiences in your own life. When supporting someone else while you are suffering yourself may appear to be a perplexing phenomena, Kelly shows how raising up others benefits both the giver and the receiver of our compassion throughout this course.

Sherry.

Sounds True designed and developed this course.

Instructors

  • Sounds True provides transformative programs that will assist you in living a more authentic, loving, and meaningful life in the present and future. When Tami Simon launched Sounds True in 1985, she had a clear mission: to transmit spiritual truths. Since its humble beginnings as a one-woman project with a tape recorder, Sounds True has grown into a multimedia publishing company with more than 80 employees, a library of more than 1,500 titles featuring some of the most influential teachers and visionaries of our time, and an ever-growing family of customers from all over the globe. Throughout more than three decades of development, change, and evolution, Sounds True has kept its emphasis on its underlying purpose: to inspire people to live their best lives. The purpose of Sounds True is to awaken the rest of the planet.

Kelly McGonigal

  • Sounds True provides transformative programs that will assist you in living a more authentic, caring, and meaningful life in the present and future generations. When Tami Simon launched Sounds True in 1985, she had a definite objective in mind: to spread spiritual understanding. It all started with one woman and her tape recorder, and now Sounds True has grown into a multimedia publishing company with more than 80 employees, a library of more than 1,500 titles featuring some of the most influential teachers and visionaries of the modern era, and an ever-growing family of customers from all over the globe. Sounds True has retained its emphasis on its underlying objective during more than three decades of growth, development, and evolution. In order to awaken the world, Sounds True has set out on a quest

Skills covered in this course

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Contents

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The Healing Power of Compassion

Compassion, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is defined as “sympathetic awareness of others’ misery combined with a wish to alleviate that distress.” “Compassion is a readiness to notice and be sensitive to the pain of others, as well as a genuine dedication and willingness to do something to alleviate that suffering,” says psychologist Dr. Lauren Tober. ” According to me, compassion is about loving people, actually caring about them, embracing them unconditionally and without judgment, and accepting them exactly where they are, in their current state.

  1. In fact, our world will not be able to function properly without it.
  2. The existence of mankind is impossible to imagine without them.” Whenever I drive my daughter to school in the morning, I turn on the radio for the morning news and am bombarded with story after story about the madness and tragedies that are taking on throughout the world.
  3. Each and every day, I speak with people who are discouraged and in pain.
  4. Therefore, we close down and hide behind walls of condemnation and blame.
  5. When we have compassion for others, it opens our hearts to their pain and helps us feel connected to and a part of our communities.
  6. Developing compassion is taught in many faiths across the world, and having compassion is essentially our inherent condition of being, according to science.
  7. It is unfathomably exciting to be alive now.

We all wonder how we may have a good effect on the world around us.

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Is it possible to have a constructive conversation with folks who are causing us discomfort?

By choosing a style of life that allows us to contribute every day to the world of peace that we wish to see, we can effect change within ourselves, our families, our communities, and the wider globe.

Yet another approach is to begin thinking about the individuals we care about and remembering them on a daily basis.

Then, one by one, add more names to the list of persons we think about on a daily basis.

It has really been scientifically confirmed to be true.

Our activities have an influence on the people around us, and the actions of those people have an impact on the people surrounding them, and so on until all of these little circles of people begin to have an impact on larger and larger circles of people.

Peace is formed by the compassion we individually show one another, by the random acts of kindness we perform on a daily basis, by the excellent work we do in our communities without being noticed, and by recognizing that those who harm us are also human beings who are experiencing distress.

All we have to do is keep sowing little seeds of compassion around us on a daily basis, and via the contagious ripple effect, we will transform our world into one that is more secure and peaceful.

The Mental Health Benefits of Compassion

According to studies, meditation methods such as the one seen in the movie improve compassion. In one research, some individuals meditated while others did not, according to the results. After that, they were sent to a waiting area. Following that, a character on crutches entered, seeming to be in considerable agony. Participants who had been meditating were 50 percent more inclined to assist the individual who was in agony as a consequence of their experience. The relationship between mindfulness and compassion is unmistakable.

As a result, you are aware of everything that is going on around you and within you.

The fact that mindfulness meditation is an intrinsic element of the comprehensive therapeutic philosophy at Newport Academy is one of the reasons behind this.

And it promotes self-reflection as well as other benefits.

The Benefits of Meditation

Meditation, on the other hand, provides a variety of advantages. A research conducted at John Hopkins University discovered that meditation had the same impact on feelings of anxiety and depression as medications when it came to reducing symptoms. Meditation has also been shown to be beneficial.

  • Boost focus and attention by decreasing “wandering mind,” which is connected with sadness
  • Increase empathy by decreasing symptoms of ADHD
  • Decrease symptoms of depression by increasing empathy

A technique known as loving-kindness meditation (LKM) has also been shown to boost sentiments of compassion and love in those who participate in it.

A Compassion-Building Meditation Practice

A technique known as loving-kindness meditation (LKM) has also been shown to boost sentiments of compassion and love in those who engage in it.

How to Practice Loving-Kindness Meditation

In this loving-kindness meditation guide, Gil Fronsdal of the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, California, and the Insight Retreat Center in Santa Cruz, California, shares his techniques for practicing loving-kindness meditation.

  • Situate yourself in a comfortable and relaxed position
  • Take three deep breaths, exhaling slowly and completely on each expiration. Let go of any worries you may have
  • Afterwards, visualize the breath going through the middle of your chest, near the location of your heart
  • Because it is frequently difficult to love others without first loving oneself, it is best to begin by focusing positive thoughts on yourself. As a result, while sitting quietly, mentally repeat the following or similar sentences, slowly and steadily, in your mind: May I be joyful, may I be well, may I be secure, may I be at ease, and may I be at peace. Allow yourself to become immersed in the intentions expressed by these statements as you speak them. Permit any feelings of warmth, love, and pleasure to develop as well. After then, think of a loved one or someone else in your life to whom you have a strong emotional attachment. Then gently repeat words of loving-kindness toward them, such as: “May you be happy, May you be well, May you be secure, May you be peaceful and at ease
  • ” “May you be safe, May you be peaceful and at ease
  • ” “May you be peaceful and at rest.” Throughout the rest of the meditation, bring to mind additional people you care about such as family and friends, neighbors, acquaintances, strangers, and even animals. Finally, show genuine compassion to those that are tough to get along with in your life. You may utilize the same sentences over and over again by repeating them. Alternative, you may come up with your own terms to better express your feelings of loving-kindness for these species. During loving-kindness meditation, it is possible to experience sensations that appear to be diametrically opposed to one another, such as rage, grief, or sadness. Please see them as indicators of softening in your heart that is unveiling what has been hidden within it, and aim loving-kindness toward these sentiments. Above all, keep in mind that there is no need to be critical of oneself.

Wired for Compassion

Situate yourself in a comfortable and relaxed position; take three deep breaths, exhaling slowly and fully after each one. Remove all anxieties from your mind. As you breathe in, visualize the air passing through the middle of your chest, at the region of your heart. In order to love others without first loving yourself, it is best to start by sending yourself positive thoughts and intentions. For example, when sitting quietly and thinking about the following or similar sentences, slowly and steadily repeat them in your mind: Happy, healthy, safe, quiet, and at ease are all wishes I wish for myself.

– Furthermore, let any feelings of warmth, love, and pleasure to develop; and Consider someone close to you or someone else in your life to whom you have a strong emotional attachment.

Finally, show genuine compassion to those who are tough to get along with or understand.

Alternative, you may come up with your own terms to better express your feelings of compassion and goodwill toward these species.

Take them as indications that your heart is softening and disclosing what has been hidden inside it, and aim loving-kindness toward these emotions as you do so. Always remember that there is no need to judge yourself; this is the most important thing to remember.

Why Compassion Is Good For Us

An abundance of research has demonstrated the beneficial effects of compassion. Here are a few examples of compassion’s scientifically proven impacts. A warm glow: Compassionate action, such as donating money to a good cause, activates pleasure pathways in the brain, resulting in a warm glow. A side effect of this medication is that it enhances the release of oxytocin, sometimes known as “the love hormone.” “The height of the helper”: Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that performing acts of kindness for others increases one’s well-being.

“The carryover effect” is defined as follows: Extending compassion toward others causes the brain to transition into a more positive mode of functioning.

Creating a chain reaction: Social scientists at Harvard University shown that assisting others spreads like wildfire.

Compassion is a virtue that may help others be happier.

Why Self-Compassion Matters

Additionally, we must practice self-compassion in addition to showing compassion to others. The research on self-compassion has revealed that it has a variety of good effects, including

  • An increase in happiness, more optimism, a more positive mood, a reduction in stress, increased personal initiative, a sense of interest and exploration, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and an improved capacity to relate to people

How to Cultivate Self-Compassion

Self-compassion is not the same thing as self-esteem. Our sense of self-worth is based on our achievements as well as the judgments of others about us. However, self-compassion entails a persistent attitude of acceptance and love toward oneself, no matter what. To begin practicing self-compassion, pay attention to the way you speak to yourself. You may want to consider how you might change your ideas if you realize that they are often critical, negative, or judgmental in nature. Consider speaking to yourself in the same manner as you would to someone you care about and wish to soothe.

A Daily Affirmation to Enhance Mindfulness and Compassion

Another method of cultivating compassion is to set an aim for yourself each day. Here is an intention shared by Thupten Jinpa, the Dalai Lama’s English-language translator and author of A Fearless Heart: How the Courage to Be Compassionate Can Transform Our Lives, who is also the Dalai Lama’s English-language translator and author of A Fearless Heart. This day, I intend to make my existence significant. I will make every effort to incorporate conscious intention into my interactions with others, to the extent that this is feasible.

When the chance presents itself, I will do all in my power to be kind to people and to at the very least refrain from injuring them. I’m going to be more aware. I intend to show attention and consideration for the individuals in my life. I’ll be able to make my day more meaningful this way.

Recognizing Our Commonalities

Remembering the parallels that exist between others and ourselves aids in the development of compassion. When we concentrate on what we have in common with one another, we feel more connected to one another. As a result, compassion is more readily available. You may complete this five-step exercise while focusing on another person—a friend, a stranger, or even someone with whom you have a problematic relationship—while performing the practice inwardly. 1: “Like me, this individual is on the lookout for happiness in their life.” 2: “Like me, this individual is attempting to escape pain in his or her own life.” 3: “Like me, this individual has experienced misery, loneliness, and hopelessness.” 4: “Like me, this individual is looking for ways to meet their requirements.” 5: “This individual is learning about life in the same way that I am.” To summarize, there are several effective strategies for increasing compassion and self-compassion.

Although it may take some time to become proficient in these techniques, the advantages to one’s mental health are well worth the effort.

Sources

We may create compassion by remembering the parallels that exist between others and ourselves. It is when we concentrate on the things that we share in common that we feel more connected to each other. As a result, compassion is easier to come by. You can complete this five-step exercise while focusing on another person—a friend, a stranger, or even someone with whom you have a problematic relationship—while performing the exercises inwardly. 1: “Like me, this individual is on the lookout for happiness in life.” 2, “This individual is attempting to escape hardship in their life, just like me.” Thirdly, “This individual has experienced the same feelings of grief, loneliness, and despair as I have.” 4, “This individual is looking for ways to meet their wants, just like me.” 4 5, “This individual is gaining knowledge about life in the same way that I am.” To summarize, there are several effective strategies for increasing compassion and self-compassion in one’s life.

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Although it may take some time to become proficient in these tactics, the advantages to one’s mental health are well worth the time investment.

The Healing Power of Kindness

Everyone has heard the old proverb “an apple a day keeps the doctor away,” but what about “a grin keeps the doctor away”? There is a growing body of scientific evidence that kindness has the ability to heal, according to an extensive scientific literature review sponsored by Dignity Health and conducted by the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford University. Kindness has the ability to heal because it is based on compassion and altruism. Our physical health has been shown to be significantly improved by this sometimes neglected and almost cost-free therapy, which is now widely accepted.

In fact, it doesn’t even necessitate a visit to the pharmacist.

However, this view is no longer just a pleasant idea; it is now supported by scientific evidence.

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The Compassionate Connection

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  • The author, who is the creator of the program in integrative medicine at the University of Wisconsin, provides a long list of reassuring examples in which conscious attention to that facet of caring has made a demonstrable impact in patients’ well-being and rate of recovery.
  • This study stands out among the numerous recent research on empathy, mindfulness, and compassion in medical treatment because it is so heartwarming.
  • His own years of experience provide him with valuable insights, including respectfully sharing personal communication errors from which he has learnt the significance of expanding his listening and refining his understanding of what is shared between patient and caregiver.
  • The book is persuasive, motivating, and intimate enough in sections that it reads more like an autobiography than a political manifesto.
  • This review has been suppressed due to the fact that it includes spoilers for the film.
  • This was really helpful to me.
  • This was part of my study leave, which I used to research about spiritual activities that have an impact on our health.

His advice and thoughts are very valuable to me.

It is vital to maintain eye contact with others while listening.

physica This was really helpful to me.

This was part of my study leave, which I used to research about spiritual activities that have an impact on our health.

His advice and thoughts are very valuable to me.

It is vital to maintain eye contact with others while listening.

The evidence presented by Dr.

Here are a few examples of constructive behaviors that patients suggested.

To help yourself and avoid burnout (which is important for caregivers), he offers suggestions such as: acknowledging and releasing personal biases (which can cause stress), remaining mindful and intentional in one’s interactions with others, using body language, and practicing mindfulness, among other things.

  • Posted on June 19, 2018 by Megan rated it liked it This book caught my eye on the new nonfiction shelf at the library, and it sounded like it may provide some useful insights on how to improve my listening skills.
  • That’s where the book fell into the rabbit hole.
  • This book caught my eye on the new nonfiction shelf at the library, and it sounded like it may provide some useful insights on how to improve my listening skills.
  • That’s where the book fell into the rabbit hole.
  • more The first day of May is May 1, 2018.
  • This book is primarily intended for healthcare professionals and others who are caring for a sick or injured individual, but it contains a wealth of knowledge that is beneficial to everyone.
  • He describes tactics to assist ourselves and others in releasing the healing qualities that we all possess in a genuine physical and physiological sense, as well as how to do so.

This book is primarily intended for healthcare professionals and others who are caring for a sick or injured individual, but it contains a wealth of knowledge that is beneficial to everyone.

He describes tactics to assist ourselves and others in releasing the healing qualities that we all possess in a genuine physical and physiological sense, as well as how to do so.

Not a sentimental eulogy, but rather a wake-up call to the way in which full human beings function.

I would suggest this book to health-care professionals, and indeed, to everyone who cares for someone.

It may serve as an inspiration for you in your everyday life as a friend, coworker, and member of society.

Furthermore, because compassionate care begins with self-care, you may find this to be beneficial on a personal level as well.

Dec 22, 2018I was ecstatic about it; it was fantastic.

This struck a deep chord with me as someone who has been called to healing work and is now pursuing a higher level of training.

Anyone involved in the healing arts should read this book.

Written with care and research, this article discusses how mindfulness may be used in clinical practice and the healing impact of excellent caregiver communication.

This book is highly recommended for any physician or caregiver who want to deliver the greatest possible treatment, healing, and building of health-promoting connections to patients.

The finest book about relationship care that I’ve ever read, in my opinion.

Instruct your pastor and physician to read this!

This is an excellent book!

Highly recommended if you want to brush up on your understanding of how to connect with others through empathy.

Definitely more scholarly in nature and oriented at those in the medical field.

Definitely more scholarly in nature and oriented at those in the medical field.

On November 10, 2018, Georgiarated it and said she really loved itgosh People, by their very nature, desire to be heard and cared for.

This book has radically revolutionized my relationship with my emotions, my eating habits, and my perception of the world.

The most important thing is compassion.

This is an excellent book.

And provided me with a great deal of knowledge and comprehension.

Amazing perspective on medicine – where it is, but more crucially where it should be, according to the author.

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LOYAL NANA – THE HEALING POWER OF SELF-COMPASSION

As a basis for self-care, self-compassion might be viewed as the starting point. Whereas self-care is comprised of actions, self-compassion is a way of connecting to oneself that helps us to recognize what we require in the form of self-care. Professor Kristin Neff, who is presently a professor of psychology at the University of Texas in Austin, is the creator and developer of this paradigm. At the time, she was in the final year of her PhD dissertation in human development at the University of California, Berkeley, when she developed a personal interest in Buddhism and started practicing insight meditation.

She continued her postdoctoral studies in India for another two years during which time she remained in the country.

She continued to refine the framework over the course of 14 years, and in 2011, she wrote Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself, which is based on her research.

Neff and his colleague Dr.

It is possible to use self-compassion in a variety of situations, and these strategies can be beneficial for people who are trying to build emotional resilience or motivate themselves, who are suffering from anxiety and despair, or who are going through a terrible life situation.

A similarity exists between self-compassion and the compassion we have for others.

Many people are instinctively able to provide this to others, but they have difficulty locating these sensations within themselves.

Self-Kindness can be substituted for self-judgement.

3) Find a way to balance the weight of negative emotions.

Recognizing that we are not alone in our suffering is not a method of diminishing what we are going through, but rather a way of recognizing that we are not especially imperfect or deserving of suffering because we are going through it.

Even when these notions are reduced to a series of bullet points, it takes time to develop a habit of putting them into practice.

However, Neff emphasizes that self-compassion is not about forcing good feelings or indulging in complacency, but rather about learning to direct goodwill towards yourself (or others, for that matter).

The threat of verbal abuse is seldom an incentive for achievement, especially when it is aimed at oneself.

There are a range of approaches that may be used to begin developing the capacity to practice self-compassion.

Neff’s website also provides further materials on mindfulness.

Instead of dealing with difficulties by inflating my self-esteem, I’ve tried to retrain the voice in my brain to focus on better coping strategies rather than viciously blaming myself for having issues in the first place.

I’ve also personally discovered that developing a better understanding of how we ourselves experience and handle suffering helps us maintain and expand our compassion for others, and as a result, I feel more connected to the people in my immediate environment and community.

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