Transcending Borders, Transcending Boundaries

Transcending borders – bridging language boundaries in linguistically mixed teams

ABSTRACT In today’s globalizing corporate environment, language diversity has emerged as one of the most significant obstacles to the successful operation of multinational corporations. Unquestionably, one of the most important questions is not only about how members interact with one another, which languages are utilized, and for what purpose and operation, but also about how to maximize the pleasure of such members in linguistically mixed teams. Specifically, the purpose of this article is to investigate the ways in which people, with varied degrees of intercultural empathy and understanding, have met with varying degrees of success while attempting to transcend language barriers.

In the context of globalization of business, linguistic diversity appears to be one of the most significant challenges for the operation of businesses that operate across international borders.

Specifically, the purpose of this study is to investigate the manner in which interlocuteurs, with their varying degrees of intercultural empathy and comprehension, encounter varying degrees of success while attempting to cross linguistic boundaries.

The goal of this project is to establish a link between the use of a common language (practices), multilingual abilities (competencies), and intercultural attitudes (attitudes) of individuals in order to close the gap between them in terms of linguistic and cultural competence.

Disclosure statement

The author said that he had no possible conflicts of interest to disclose.

Notes on contributor

The University of Geneva and the University of Lausanne employ Patchareerat Yanaprasart as a lecturer in applied linguistics, where she teaches courses and seminars on topics such as pragmatic linguists pedagogy, sociolinguistics, intercultural studies, and language pedagogy. She also teaches Executive MBA modules and supervises Master’s Degree students at the Universities of Applied Sciences in Switzerland and the ESSCA Graduate School of Management in France, where she is a visiting professor.

Monographs, journal articles, and edited volumes are among the works she has published.

She is now working on a volume with Georges Lüdi and Katharina Höchle-Meier titled, Managing plurilingual and intercultural practices in the workplace, which she co-edited with them. Switzerland is an example of a multilingual society (John Benjamins, 2016).

Transcending borders – bridging language boundaries in linguistically mixed teams

ABSTRACT In today’s globalizing corporate environment, language diversity has emerged as one of the most significant obstacles to the successful operation of multinational corporations. Unquestionably, one of the most important questions is not only about how members interact with one another, which languages are utilized, and for what purpose and operation, but also about how to maximize the pleasure of such members in linguistically mixed teams. Specifically, the purpose of this article is to investigate the ways in which people, with varied degrees of intercultural empathy and understanding, have met with varying degrees of success while attempting to transcend language barriers.

In the context of globalization of business, linguistic diversity appears to be one of the most significant challenges for the operation of businesses that operate across international borders.

Specifically, the purpose of this study is to investigate the manner in which interlocuteurs, with their varying degrees of intercultural empathy and comprehension, encounter varying degrees of success while attempting to cross linguistic boundaries.

The goal of this project is to establish a link between the use of a common language (practices), multilingual abilities (competencies), and intercultural attitudes (attitudes) of individuals in order to close the gap between them in terms of linguistic and cultural competence.

Disclosure statement

The author said that he had no possible conflicts of interest to disclose.

Notes on contributor

The University of Geneva and the University of Lausanne employ Patchareerat Yanaprasart as a lecturer in applied linguistics, where she teaches courses and seminars on topics such as pragmatic linguists pedagogy, sociolinguistics, intercultural studies, and language pedagogy. She also teaches Executive MBA modules and supervises Master’s Degree students at the Universities of Applied Sciences in Switzerland and the ESSCA Graduate School of Management in France, where she is a visiting professor.

Monographs, journal articles, and edited volumes are among the works she has published.

She is now working on a volume with Georges Lüdi and Katharina Höchle-Meier titled, Managing plurilingual and intercultural practices in the workplace, which she co-edited with them. Switzerland is an example of a multilingual society (John Benjamins, 2016).

Transcending Borders, Transcending Boundaries

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. Every time I do yoga, I’m struck by how it completely eliminates the concept of separateness, as in: I am me, you are you, and while we may be breathing the same air, we each exist in our own tiny universes. Yoga helps me to forget about all of it. Or perhaps it serves to remind me of what I already know deep down: that there is a thread of connection that connects us all in some way.

  1. I’ve sat on my mat next to yogis who effortlessly glide into Handstand and others who I’ve wished for a block to support them in the Triangle pose.
  2. When I’m not chanting with white-turbaned Kundalini practitioners, I’m making pools of sweat in Bikram classes, hoofed my way through the Ashtanga Primary Series, and flowed through more Sun Salutations than I can remember.
  3. Yoga, as it turns out, is the great unifier of all religions.
  4. I stood outside the Grand Palais des Champs-Elysées, where 4,000 yellow yoga mats awaited participants at the much-anticipated White Yoga event organized by apparel manufacturer Lol.
  5. Everyone was definitely excited to be there, as seen by their enthusiastic wearing of white practice togs.
  6. The only thing I could think about was how afraid I was that someone would try to chat to me and realize that my French was limited to ” bonjour.” The reality that I was feeling lonely was hard to deny as I worked on setting up my mat space and stretching my hamstrings.
  7. In between glances around the room while Colleen Saidman Yee and Grace Dubery guided us through a great, heartfelt practice, I saw something.

It wasn’t until we were lying down in Savasana that I realized how the atmosphere of the room had shifted, from an intense sense of expectation and excitement to a palpable sense of lightness, community, and, yes, calm.

A little while later, as I was carefully rolling up my mat and gathering my luggage, two women came me and introduced themselves.

They burst out laughing.

When the second woman spoke in halting English, she said, “It was good to practice with you.” My heart melted as I read this.

We kissed each other farewell and laughed a little.

I took a step back and placed my palms together in the anjali mudra, bent my head, and closed my eyes.

Their wonderful unison response was “Namaste,” which they repeated before turning and vanishing among the throngs of people heading for the exit. There’s not much else to say about it, really. Kelle Walsh works as the Executive Online Editor at Yoga Journal.

Transcending borders and boundaries

In most people’s minds, the areas of peacebuilding and protest are considered as inhabiting two independent and distinct universes. However, in South Asia’s women’s movements, beginning in the 1980s and becoming more visible in the 1990s, these became increasingly linked as intellectuals and activists formed synergies and cross-border solidarity. Kamla Bhasin, a feminist hero who died in September, made a significant contribution to the resolution of this conflict. The artist channeled her singular creative energy on overcoming borders and limits, moving past monocultures of the mind that propagate prejudices, mistrust and militarism, and expressing the geographical fears of nation states in her artworks.

The recognition that women across South Asia are subjected to a continuum of violence — both structural and overt — as they contend with patriarchal structures in the family, community, and state, as well as “the complicities between them,” has resulted in the formation of networks that are not bound by national boundaries.

These works demonstrated the ways in which women’s bodies were inscribed with community and even national honor, as well as the gendered character of civic participation.

It also created an environment conducive to inquiry and agitation that called into question the “sanctity of boundaries.”

Singular experiences

As a result of the addition of several ethnographic narratives that gave voice to the unique experiences of women living in conflict zones — including those in Bangladesh, Nepal, Afghanistan, Pakistan — to the repertoire, civil society transversal engagements across South Asia on issues such as justice and rights, patriarchy, militarisation, and nuclearisation have become possible. While different governments and their neighbors were engaged in hostile confrontations, particularly between India and Pakistan, feminists like Bhasin were hard at work to guarantee that people-to-people interaction and a type of public diplomacy helped to maintain conversation and foster synergies.

Montville in 1981) or “multi-track diplomacy” in their discussions.

Initiatives such as the Women’s Action Forum (WAF) in Pakistan, which reached out to their sisters in Bangladesh to apologize for the atrocities committed by the Pakistan army in 1971; the Women’s Peace Bus, which traveled from Delhi to Lahore in 2000 to demand a war-free and nuclear-free South Asia; and Women in Security Conflict Management and Peace (WISCOMP), which brought young South Asians together in workshops on terrorism and conflict management; and the Women’s Initiative for Peace in South Asia ( In recent decades, South Asia has witnessed the emergence of “disobedient women” collectives who have spoken peace and defied state-centric ideals of security and order while also expressing their own.

They have been visible in the mother’s movements in Sri Lanka, the Didi Bahini movement in Nepal, the Thappa Force in the ” Malki ya Maut” farmers fight in Pakistan, and the Chipko, Narmada, Bhopal, and Kudankulam movements in India, among other activities.

These movements have generally entered the peacebuilding arena through the corridors of human security, drawing on the experiences of activists such as Bhasin who have carved out a space for women “in the resistance.” These movements are advocating for democracy and recovering citizenship.

Core of their engagement

Opposition to war and militaristic cultures have been at the heart of their participation, bringing attention to the conflicts that exist between people’s security and what is generally referred to as national security in the West. In addition, the necessity of linking concerns of peace and security to development in order to address the structural roots of violent conflict is brought to the forefront. Feminist scholars have frequently drawn connections between the formal security discourse and certain types of hegemonic masculinity, as well as the ways in which policy priorities and (techno) strategic discourse are skewed in order to maintain power hierarchies at the national, regional, and global levels.

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Women’s movements have called into question the traditional peace metaphor of the woman in white, who is either passively saintly or completely inactive.

This has been their rallying cry.

As a result of her extraordinary communication skills, Bhasin attracted a large number of young activists, “deploying” slogans as well as art, music, and humour to make her succinct and accessible primers on gender, patriarchy, and peace resonate across groups while delving into the most complex feminist concepts.

This peace praxis, which has at its core dissent and non-violent activism and which connects the personal with the political, frequently employs spectacular forms of protest and brings everyday artifacts from women’s private spheres such as children’s toys, diapers, rolling pins, clothing, veils, and sometimes even female bodies into the public space, in a manner similar to what Mahatma Gandhi did with khadi and salt during his lifetime.

These forms of protest draw effortlessly from the collective global palimpsest of feminist activity that has been chiseled by women all across the world, and they are becoming increasingly popular.

“Location,” as well as the intersectionality of caste, class, region, religion, and gender, have a role in shaping women’s experiences of conflict and violence.

When it comes to mobilizing for peace, this presents a unique problem.

It was also in her hallmark song, ” Azaadi,” that she raised attention to the “other walls” — psychological barriers erected out of distrust, fear, dishonesty, and, most all, a “othering” that can only be overcome by “putting oneself in the shoes of the perceived other.” Aikido practitioners and South Asian women activists have worked together since the mid-1980s to “engender” peace by bringing in bigger numbers of people from “hostile” neighborhoods into safe “disarmed,” empathic spaces of trust, just as they have done with Aikido practitioners in the past.

  1. They opted to “sweat in peace rather than bleed in battle” because they had companionship and community to rely on for support and resilience.
  2. It also occurred prior to the adoption of feminist diplomacy by the Scandinavian nations and the exhortations of the Hillary Clinton Doctrine that women’s rights and violence against women be considered matters of national security, both of which were implemented in the United States.
  3. It is imperative that the tale of their vital contributions to the WPS discourse be made more widely known.
  4. It also serves as an invitation to civic society to continue to fine-tune the music of democracy on a regular basis.
  5. She worked hard to inscribe it into the hearts and minds of others, all with love.

Moreover, she accomplished it with “passion and compassion, as well as humour and flair,” as we all must. New Delhi-based Meenakshi Gopinath serves as the Chair of the Centre for Policy Research (CPR) and as the Director of Women in Security, Conflict Management, and Peace (WISCOMP).

Transcending Boundaries

CBP San Diego Operations are based in San Ysidro. Vehicle traffic entering the United States from Mexico is observed from a roof top as it passes through U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the San Ysidro border port of entry, according to the video. Donna Burton was the photographer. Art has the ability to transcend borders, as seen by a cursory look at the history of art around the world. Globalization has resulted in the free flow of ideas, movements, methods, and materials across borders.

  • It was a formative experience for the artist.
  • For example, Jackson Pollock trained with David Alfaro Siqueiros at the Siqueiros Experimental Workshop, which was founded by the Mexican Modernists.
  • Cage, an American composer who was born in New York City, used the mystical cleromancy from the ancient Chinese I Ching for his composition for solo piano, Music of Changes (1951).
  • It was determined that the composition would be realized by using judgments from the I Ching, and as a result, the piece was designated as a significant work of indeterminate music, a form pioneered by John Cage and in which elements of a piece are left up to chance.
  • Using art to educate us about the freedom to express oneself, we may learn that ideas, movements, signs, and symbols, as well as our own freedom of expression, are subject to very few limits and are open to interpretation, transformation, and recontextualization.
  • For example, the Elements of Art and Principles of Design are both considered ‘guidelines’ in visual arts education, and they are generally considered a good place to start so that a student learns skills and methods in order to express symbolically in the materials of their choosing.
  • It is the ability of an educated artist (or a person who has been educated via art) to come up with several solutions to an aesthetic challenge that may or may not involve the formal components of art and design principles that distinguishes him or her from other people.
  • Making decisions in the absence of rules is one of Elliot Eisner’s studio habits of mind, and it has application in all other aspects of a person’s life, not only in the entertainment industry.
  • Consider what is currently taking place in the Middle East, which demonstrates that our world does not accept single proper answers to issues or clear-cut solutions to problems.

“Opening oneself to the unpredictable is not an ubiquitous aspect of our contemporary educational environment,” says Eisner of this habit of thinking, which he calls “flexible purposing.” “I feel that it should be included among the ideals that we hold dear.” Inquiry-based learning is encouraged by a person’s mental habits, which grow more widespread over his or her life.

  1. The act of examining issues and understanding that there are many various circumstances to account for (as well as scenarios that we haven’t even considered yet) opens us up to innovative alternatives and solutions that we may have previously considered to be inconceivable.
  2. Having political borders that are strictly maintained makes it difficult for individuals and groups of people to move freely from one location to another.
  3. For many people who need to cross the border for business, it might take hours to travel from the United States into Mexico and vice versa.
  4. Another issue that is becoming increasingly prevalent is the staggering number of Syrian residents who have been forced to flee their homes and are now living as refugees.
  5. In order to “envision fresh choices and frame inventive solutions” that will address the concerns of immigration and the expanding refugee crisis, a great deal of creative problem solving, cooperation, and placemaking will be required.
  6. The results are well worth the effort, as seen by the amazing work of Tanya Aguiiga and the resident artists of the Za’atari Refugee Camp, which can be found here.
  7. The complete movie is currently available at MAD as part of the exhibition ‘Tanya Aguiiga: Craft and Care.’ Tijuana-born artist and designer Tanya Aguiiga creates craft-based work that is rich in both materials and subject matter.
  8. In grade school, Aguiiga walked many hours each day across the San Ysidro border into California to attend school, and she got intimately acquainted with life on both sides of the border and along the border itself.
  9. A big part of her work is based on the intersectionality of identity, and she analyzes social and emotional relationships through the act of “Performance Crafting,” in which two or more people participate in a collaborative creative process.

Understanding art as a method of overcoming the uncertainty and tension that arises from political boundaries, Aguiiga launched AMBOS (Art Made Between Opposite Sides), an art and activist initiative that explores the relationships that exist between individuals living in border zones, in 2008.

  1. Whether they cross the border for work or to see their relatives, it is an integral part of their daily lives.
  2. This group of people is attempting to transcend the physical limit that divides them by participating in the collaborative creation of an artwork and documenting how their lives are affected in comparable ways by the physical separation produced by the border.
  3. That is at the heart of the humanitarian disaster that is presently engulfing the Syrian people.
  4. Refugees who are separated from their families and live in a perpetual state of flux and trauma might find catharsis by participating in collaborative art projects within the camp while they are away from home.
  5. Beginning in 2013, Joel Artista traveled to the camp to work with Syrian refugees on a variety of projects.
  6. Children and young people created paintings on structures and things like as kites and wheelbarrows that reminded them of their homes, addressed concerns (such as clean water and cleanliness) that are vital in the camp, and honored their strong cultural identities, which cannot be displaced.
  7. Based on the expressions on the children’s faces in the photographs on Artista’s website, it is clear that they are pleased with the art they have produced.
  8. Life is full with surprises.
  9. We may all become more skilled at dealing with life’s curve balls if we include studio habits of mind, such as making judgments in the absence of rules and flexible purposing, into our daily routines.

References, notes, and more reading recommendations: Elliot W. Eisner is the author of this work (2002). ‘What can education learn about the practice of education from the arts?’ says the author. The Encyclopedia of Informal Education is a resource for those interested in informal education.

Transcending Borders and Boundaries – WISCOMP

A major focus of WISCOMP’s Conflict Transformation (CT) Program is on fostering the development of young professionals and scholars who are committed to fostering greater understanding and collaboration among the countries and diverse societies of the South Asian region, as well as within and between those countries and societies. From Islamabad, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and the United Kingdom come messages of peace. The CT Program aims to increase the ability of ‘future influentials’ (those between the ages of 20 and 45 years old) in South Asian nations to participate in conflict in a more constructive manner and to provide safe places for long-term discussion.

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The curriculum for the workshop comprises knowledge exchange, theory-building, and critical reflection on a variety of topics.

  • Conflict Analysis, Terrorism and Violent Extremism, Mediation, Accords and Negotiation Practices are some of the topics covered in this course. The Importance of Religion in Conflict
  • Agenda for Women, Peace, and Security
  • Communication through the media and the role of the media in peacebuilding
  • A Multi-Track Diplomacy approach, Post-Conflict Reconciliation and Justice, Sustaining Participatory Peace Processes, the history of women’s peace activism, Dividers and Connectors, and more are all covered in this course. Various approaches to peacebuilding
  • Democratic Practice in South Asia
  • Participation in the Arts, both performing and visual

“These on-going journeys – both within and outside of ourselves – have unquestionably resulted in profound encounters that have inspired, informed, and persuaded us.”

From a Divided Past to Shared Futures

Young South Asians participate in conflict transformation workshops in order to expand networks of peace on the Subcontinent, according to the organizers. The Annual WISCOMP Conflict Transformation Workshops have proven to be a successful model for conversation, relationship development, and capacity building, and as a result, it has been replicated by a number of organizations in the area. Visiting academics from around the world engage in dialogue with young scholars and professionals from South Asia.

  • Kevin P.
  • Varun Sahni of India (2006), Prof.
  • T.
  • A.
  • G.
  • Prof.
  • Cheema of Pakistan (2009); S.
  • Udayakumar, a Pacifist Scholar and Activist (2010); and Anna-Kaisa Heikkinen of Finland (2009) are among those who have received honors (2012) Since its inception in 2001, the Conflict Transformation Initiative has worked to transform conflict.

These seminars contain the following topics: addressed the ‘baggage of history’ that third generation Indians and Pakistanis still bear regarding “the other,” such as danger perceptions, cultural biases, and misconceptions about “the other,” drew together participants from countries as diverse as India, Pakistan, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka to discuss peacebuilding as a process, with a particular emphasis on the trajectory of the Tamil-Sinhala war and attempts to bring about peace in Sri Lanka, among other things.

focuses on the most important strategies of conflict transformation – discussion and negotiation – and on the role of the media in peacebuilding The need of conversation and leadership, as well as the difficulties of launching and sustaining participatory peace initiatives, were stressed.

aimed to capitalize on the potential offered by issues such as UN peacekeeping missions, public diplomacy, and coexistence education that could be viewed as “connectors.” highlighted the problems posed by the growing tide of terrorism, as well as the necessity to widen the scope of trust-building efforts and incorporate young South Asians in conflict prevention An experimental trialogue format between India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan was tried out during this period.

in order to call into question the beliefs and practices of peacebuilding communities around the world and in particular, the area provided an opportunity for reflection on the functioning of democracy in each of the countries of South Asia, as well as on their ability to bring peace and gender justice to their citizens, particularly women and the underprivileged.

According to the report, “WISCOMP paper follows the amazing journey of exhilaration, fulfillment, and difficulties associated with the peacebuilding activity and gives recommendations for future peacebuilding in South Asia.” The participants of the Second Annual Conflict Transformation Workshop (2003) met with the late President of India, Dr.

Abdul Kalam, and discussed ways to bridge the divide.

– Manjrika Sewak, Co-author, Bridging the Divide ‘While one of the Workshop’s most significant triumphs was that it succeeded in humanizing ‘the other,’ its influence will be far-reaching since it helped to build trust between future leaders and policymakers.”

Transcending borders, surpassing boundaries

  • We’re going worldwide. The American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, published online May 15, 2009, at doi: 10.2146/ajhp080641, Surugue J.PMID: 19420313 Surugue J.Am J Health-System Pharmacy, published online May 15, 2009, at doi: 10.2146/ajhp080641 There is no abstract available
  • Nonetheless, worldwide partnership in pharmacy is in our near future. T. Nabeshima, Ph.D. The American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, 2008 Nov 1
  • 65(21):2055-7. doi: 10.2146/ajhp080322.Am J Health-System Pharmacy, 2008.PMID:18945866 There is no abstract available for the 2006 Remington Lecture, which is titled “The Pursuit of Dignity.” Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association (2006 Sep-Oct
  • 46(5):550-4. doi: 10.1331/1544-3191.46.5.0050.gibson.J Am Pharm Assoc (2003).PMID:17036640 Kenneth N. Barker, a pioneering pharmacist and drug mistakes researcher, died at the age of 80. There is no abstract available. Thompson CA.Thompson CA.Thompson CA. Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2017 Nov 1
  • 74(21):1757-1760. doi: 10.2146/news170066. Epub 2017 Nov 1. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy Am J Health Syst Pharm. 2017.PMID:28912142. Published on September 14, 2017. In the instance of Fiocruz, there is no abstract available. International health cooperation: a case study Ferreira JR, Hoirisch C, Fonseca LE, Buss PM. Ferreira JR, Hoirisch C, Fonseca LE, Buss PM. Ferreira JR, et al., Hist Cienc Saude Manguinhos (Historical Cienc Saude Manguinhos). 267-276. doi: 10.1590/S0104-59702016000200002. Published online April-June 2016. Citation: Historia Cienc Saude Manguinhos (2016). PMID:27280315 Review. English and Portuguese are the languages spoken. There is no abstract available.

Mobility in Contemporary Zimbabwean Literature in English: Crossing Borders, Transcending Boundaries (Routledge Contemporary Africa) (Hardcover)

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Description

From the commencement of the contentious Fast Track Land Reform Programme through the conclusion of the Mugabe administration, this book examines how the notion of mobility is portrayed in Zimbabwean works of fiction published in English during that period. Transnational out-migration to and from Zimbabwe has reached record proportions since 2000, mostly as a result of political strife and economic slump that have come to be known collectively as the Zimbabwe Crisis. It is as a result of this that there has been a rise in the number of literary writings addressing migration, both in locally produced texts and literature written by authors located in the diaspora.

Among the topics covered are significant developments and trends in modern Zimbabwean literature, as well as the relationship between state authoritarianism and the restriction of mobility, as well as the possibility for literature to interfere in prevailing political discourses in Zimbabwe.

This book will be of interest to academics who are interested in African literature, Southern Africa, migration, and mobility.

Amazon.com: Mobility in Contemporary Zimbabwean Literature in English: Crossing Borders, Transcending Boundaries (Routledge Contemporary Africa): 9780367637811: Pfalzgraf, Magdalena: Books

From the commencement of the contentious Fast Track Land Reform Programme through the conclusion of the Mugabe administration, this book examines how the notion of mobility is portrayed in Zimbabwean works of fiction published in English during that period. Transnational out-migration to and from Zimbabwe has reached record proportions since 2000, mostly as a result of political strife and economic slump that have come to be known collectively as the Zimbabwe Crisis. It is as a result of this that there has been a rise in the number of literary writings addressing migration, both in locally produced texts and literature written by authors located in the diaspora.

Among the topics covered are significant developments and trends in modern Zimbabwean literature, as well as the relationship between state authoritarianism and the restriction of mobility, as well as the possibility for literature to interfere in prevailing political discourses in Zimbabwe.

This book will be of interest to academics who are interested in African literature, Southern Africa, migration, and mobility. It establishes a rich conversation between literary criticism and mobility studies.

Amazon.com: Mobility in Contemporary Zimbabwean Literature in English: Crossing Borders, Transcending Boundaries (Routledge Contemporary Africa) eBook : Pfalzgraf, Magdalena: Kindle Store

From the commencement of the contentious Fast Track Land Reform Programme through the conclusion of the Mugabe period, this book examines how the notion of mobility is portrayed in Zimbabwean works of fiction published in English. The Zimbabwe Crisis, which began in 2000 as a result of political turmoil and economic depression, has resulted in unprecedented levels of transnational out-migration to countries such as the United States and Europe. A result has been a rise in the number of literary texts addressing migration, both in locally produced works and works by authors located in the diaspora, as a result of this.

The author analyses significant changes and trends in modern Zimbabwean literature, focusing on the relationship between state authoritarianism and control of mobility, as well as the capacity of literature to intervene in dominant political discourses in the country’s history.

This work, which establishes a rich conversation between literary criticism and mobility studies, will be of interest to academics who are interested in African literature, Southern Africa, migration, and mobility.

Transcending boundaries through art

When it comes to the connection between nations that share borders in South Asia, the world is no stranger to political conflicts, religious tensions, and socio-economic disputes—the globe is no stranger to these frictions. It has been achieved via the ongoing fight between conflict and collaboration that the lines between the countries have become firmer if not stronger. Pushing past these boundaries in an attempt to blur the lines of conflict is not accomplished by the use of a grand strategy or program, but rather through the use of the artistic instrument of creation.

  1. Artists who work in public places examine subjects that are important to them, such as the duty of power, memory and history, and how people interact with and appreciate these things in public areas.
  2. As the curator of the show, Bhavna Kakkar points out that Nepal is a visa-free zone, which made it an ideal setting for the artists.
  3. There are several topographical obstacles that must be taken into consideration.
  4. A diverse collection of etchings, pencil drawings, watercolours, and prints combine with the Paubha paintings to create a cohesive composition that ultimately accentuates each of the artworks.
  5. The art form of Paubha, which is a historic art form that is still very much in practice today, “blends contemporary with tradition,” adds Bhavna.
  6. This culminated in the show “Nowthere,” which was held in New York City.
  7. It evokes both the concept of time and the concept of space.
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Everything from multiple layers of personal encounters, myths and fables, intrinsic self-observation, to the emulation of important personalities—all of this comes together to form an interesting set of artworks in the exhibition that bridges the gap between the boundaries of time, space, geography, and one’s own individual identities.

  1. Known as “Myth and Realities,” the collection contains deities from Hindu, Roman, and Greek mythology as well as prominent religious personalities such as Gautam Buddha and Mother Theresa.
  2. The sculptures of battle heroes and mythical gods from ancient times tend to tell stories about how contemporary socio-political situations are comparable to those from the past.
  3. Seema Kohli’s artwork, which draws influence from Indian mythology, depicts a female protagonist who is no longer bound by the constraints of either her physical or mental body.
  4. She creates mesmerizing art using 24-karat gold leaf on paper, and she addresses the common history and heritage of these two countries via her work.
  5. He takes his cues from international leaders who have made significant contributions, particularly in the South Asian arena.
  6. Moving on to more modern and recent events, the artworks of artists Maria Waseem and M Pravat are inspired by the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, which occurred in the same year.

However, after conducting research on the Internet and speaking with Nepali locals, he discovered that they relied heavily on the traditionally revered motifs of the five elements of air, water, earth, sky, and ether, and that they believed it was their faith in Lord Bhairon that enabled them to survive the earthquake.

  • He considers their work to be one of the most essential linkages between the four nations.
  • “This aspect of faith is highly underlined in South Asian countries, especially when compared to other European countries.” His writings are distinguished by a delicate balance of practical insight and religious commitment.
  • On the same note, Maria Waseem catches both the ancient and new components of the landscape—the juxtaposition of Paubha method augments them with a symbolic combination of traditional art with current photographic techniques—in a manner that is both poetic and effective.
  • The artwork of Nepalese artist Sauraganga Darshandhari is densely packed with nuances that are unique to her country’s cultural heritage.
  • “Whether it’s the architecture of our houses and temples or the rituals of our daily lives, the devotion to these things is really deep in these four countries.” Her sketches depict ladies dressed in their traditional attire and demonstrate a strong connection to the natural world.
  • His watercolour paintings are the product of his reactions to the people of South Asia, as well as his own personal experience with the shadow.
  • Women’s subordination is shown through the use of a veil or a metallic mask in this work by Bangladeshi artist Begum Tayeba Lipi, who is concerned with issues of violence against women that are pertinent to all four nations.
  • While newsfeeds of cross-border terrorism and tensions appear on our screens on a regular basis, it is programs like Nowthere that are proving to be the metaphorical “bridges” between the nations.

The exhibition will be on display at Gallery Latitude 28 in New Delhi through February 28th, and it is free to attend. The original version of this story appeared in Patriot.

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It is simple and frequently justified to express dissatisfaction with the media. But, hey, it’s the model that’s faulty, not the people.

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Papers are being solicited. East West University’s Department of English hosted the 5th International Conference. Dhaka, Bangladesh is the capital of Bangladesh. The 25th and 26th of January, 2019. Borders are transgressed/transcended through the medium of translation. Despite the fact that the activity of translating literature extends back to antiquity, the academic area of Translation Studies just began to emerge in the late 1970s. However, from being a budding field at the time, it grew exponentially in the next decade and has since established itself as a legitimate discipline.

Translation, as suggested by the Latin term translatio, may be thought of as a trans-boundary river that runs across diverse nations, cultures, and topographies, bringing them all together as a whole.

It evolves and develops with every round, bringing in new aspects with every step.

In this way, it has evolved from its early stages of ‘linguistic and general translation’ to a more contemporary incarnation known as ‘cultural translation.’ Perhaps not unexpectedly, translation has played an essential part in the teaching of second or foreign languages, as well as in other fields.

ELT-inclined academics have been forced to re-evaluate the role of translation in syllabi and pedagogy as a result of debates regarding first, how far translation can be useful in a language class, and second, how far machine translation can contribute in the future.

The level to which we are currently utilizing translation in our day-to-day lives has never been witnessed before.

For the purpose of shedding more light on the issues raised above in relation to Translation Studies, its trajectories, and its present and future relationship with the Humanities and other disciplines in a globalized world, the present conference aspires to be both inclusive and multi-faceted, and invites proposals for papers that may explore, but need not be limited to, the following topics: Theories of Translation: A Survey

  • It is important to understand the functions of translation and Translation Studies in terms of both theory and practice, particularly in the context of Bangladesh. Language-specific, general, and cultural translation theories are among the many paths that translation theory might take. It is possible for a culturally translated work to have a “afterlife” in the target language.

a translation and a work of literature

  • Traditional literature and culture
  • Translation
  • Traditional literature and culture
  • Existing situation in regard to the translation of Bengali literature into foreign languages Increasing the popularity of Bengali literature in other countries through translations
  • The translation of literary theories into the first language
  • When translation is used as an instrument of hegemonic authority in a hierarchical universe, it is known as a hierarchical translation. A postcolonial/postmodern society requires the use of translation as an act of decolonization, deconstruction, and subversion. The influence of uneven power dynamics on the translation process is discussed. Translation as well as literary critique of the environment
  • Translation in the Study of Subaltern Cultures
  • Gender and translation are two important considerations. Both translation and migration are involved.

Translation, Applied Linguistics, and English Language Teaching

  • When studying a second language, translation is useful. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of the transition from GTM to CLT, which temporarily marginalized translation
  • Considering the importance of bilingual education and code-switching in the context of the classroom
  • The practicality of conducting translation efforts in big and multilingual courses is being investigated. Considering the importance of machine translation and its potential in the future
  • Changing the way in which translation is used at basic, secondary, and tertiary levels of educational institutions

Communication between translators and the media

  • Use of translation in cinema and television
  • The effectiveness of translation in electronic, print, and social media.

Translation services in government and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

  • Competencies in translation and the requirements of the marketplace
  • Bureaucracy, the court, government and non-government organizations are all places where translation is needed. Through translation, we may transcend national and cultural borders.

Submissions should be sent to eng conference [email protected] along with a brief bio (no more than 100 words) and an abstract (no more than 250 words and 4/5 key words). Please include the phrase “Transgressing/Transcending Borders via Translation” in the subject line of your email. The maximum time allotted for a presentation is 20 minutes. Important dates and deadlines include: The deadline for submitting abstracts is September 15, 2018. Notice of the outcome of the submission will be sent out on October 15, 2018.

(Maximum 3500 words) The deadline for submitting articles for consideration for publication (in a peer-reviewed journal) will be notified at a later date.

A special prize will be given to the author of the “best paper” in the “Young Researcher” category.

There will be a panel of judges to select the best paper, and the winner will be revealed at the conclusion of the conference.

Presentations made in a jiffy: To explore the following topics, two panels, each consisting of 5-7 presenters, will be formed: 1.

2.

Each presenter will pick a specific panel and submit a proposal for a presentation of no more than 5 minutes in length.

During the Question-and-Answer and Debate session, each presenter has the opportunity to raise additional points in two minutes, in addition to responding to questions directed to them.

Send abstracts (no more than 150 words) as well as a brief bio (no more than 100 words) to eng conference [email protected] by December 1.

Students submitting proposals for Quick-Fire Presentations should also consider submitting abstracts for general presentations.

Participants will get $100.

Participants can register on the spot for 200tk (which includes merely admittance into the sessions).

If you have any further questions, you may contact us by email at eng conference [email protected] or by visiting if you have any further questions.

Mohammad Hasan Jan (Senior Lecturer) and Saifa Haque are the organizers of the conference (Senior Lecturer) East West University’s Department of English hosted the 5th International Conference.

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