War Correspondent Bhava Ram Finds the Power of Love Through Yoga

War Correspondent Bhava Ram Finds the Power of Love Through Yoga

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A war correspondent reporting from the frontlines of the world’s largest refugee crisis uncovers the power of yoga—and love.

My back is completely messed up. During a tropical hurricane, I fell over a ledge and broke my fifth vertebra while battening down the hatches on the windows. The procedure was a failure. Disabled for the foreseeable future. I can’t eat a meal or walk without using a cane because of the agony, yet it isn’t the pain that is killing me. As a result of my reporting from the frontlines of the Gulf War for NBC News, I was diagnosed with Stage Four throat cancer, which was likely caused by exposure to depleted uranium.

The bombs detonate in my head whenever I am stressed: when I shout at physicians for not treating me; when I spew nasty words toward pals if they provide consolation or if I feel ridiculed by others.

  • Morgan enjoys playing on top of my body brace as I spend most of my days lying flat on my back around the home.
  • They have informed me that they do not expect I will be alive to see his third birthday.
  • The boy trembles, then says, as if he’s uttering a request that will never come true: “Get up, Daddy.” He trembles again.
  • My veins are throbbing with a burst of adrenaline.
  • It’s a delectable nectar.
  • In this moment, I believe that my affection for this young boy, as well as his affection for me, is my sole hope of surviving.

1986. THE HIMALAYA, AFGHANISTAN

My cameraman and I are in the midst of a dense forest and deep snow, surrounded by mujahideen freedom fighters who are waging a fierce battle against Soviet forces who have invaded their motherland. If we manage to get out of here alive, I’ll be able to air my reports on the NBC television station in Boston. A Soviet MiG fighter aircraft screams overhead in the distance. We are among the hundreds of mujahideen who have fled for safety. If we are discovered, the pilots will transmit the coordinates of our location to the assault helicopters to alert them to our location.

  • The snow is up to my hips.
  • They survive on rancid goat oil and naan while fighting off the Soviets, who have the strongest army on the planet and are set on gaining control of Afghanistan and the surrounding region.
  • After my cameraman and I have captured all of the video we want, we slip out of the mountains on foot in the middle of the night with our interpreter, who serves as our guide.
  • Capture by the Soviets is associated with death in this area as well.
  • We have an interpreter behind the wheel, and she abruptly applies the breaks.
  • It is possible to see thousands of temporary tents dotting the tormented landscape of rocks and scorched soil after the dust has settled.
  • This is one of the larger camps, and sickness is prevalent among both the young and the elderly.

I saw shrapnel wounds on the faces of the children.

As my cameraman films, I approach with my microphone in a gentle manner.

Shortly after, before we are inundated by hundreds of individuals who want to share their tragic circumstances with us, the trio continues to go forward with dignity, making their way to a nearby refugee hospital.

As I study the surroundings, sweat pours down my face.

The war-wounded are housed in metal cots.

Mahmoud, I go down on my knees at one of the cots and conduct an interview with him.

Napalm burns had covered the majority of his body, causing third-degree burns.

The separation from his family.

We track down the hospital’s administrator, who agrees to a brief interview.

Shahwani, a Pakistani, expresses his surprise that so many Afghan patients are able to live despite the fact that it appears to be medically impossible.

A same fate befalls Pakistani soldiers, who are primarily mercenaries. This, according to him, is his “medical enigma.” Likewise, Deepak Chopra’s 2-Minute Meditation for Love and Forgiveness may be found here.

2OO1. CORONADO,CALIFORNIA

Since Morgan begged her father to “get up, Daddy,” it had been two years. To provide my kid with the best possible care, the only thing I could do was check into a hospital where I could detox from the painkillers, muscle relaxers, and antidepressants that I’d been prescribed, abstain from drinking, and die with dignity. My withdrawal symptoms included violent vomiting, diarrhea, hot flashes, cold flashes, tremors, and hallucinations. I emerged out the other side dizzy and confused after countless days of writhing on the floor in withdrawal.

  1. My room was needed on the detox ward for the next patient to arrive.
  2. This was a marriage in serious problems that would finally come to an end.) At that point, one of the ward physicians stepped into my room and encouraged me to participate in a tiny, experimental program at the hospital called The Pain Center.
  3. He went on to explain that the therapies were a fusion of traditional Eastern healing traditions and contemporary Western holistic procedures.
  4. “However, it’s possible that we can alleviate the discomfort and allow you to avoid drugs and drink.” Despite the fact that I was too bewildered to comprehend the comprehensive East-West modality notion, it felt like a lifeline was being thrown to me.
  5. I was put under anesthesia for a few days before electrodes were implanted in my cranium, chest, back, and arms.
  6. The technician assisted me in settling into a luxurious recliner, placing headphones over my ears, and draping a soft, cushioned cloth over my face and eyes.
  7. During my meditation, I was taken through natural visuals by a deep, calming male voice that asked me to relax.

Beaches with warm, fine sand.

Twenty minutes later, I was completely unwind and at ease.

After six weeks in the program, my nurse at the facility informed me that it was time to begin yoga classes.

Yoga was a difficult endeavor.

Deep breathing seems out of character.

I learned and practiced yoga until, all of a sudden, The Pain Clinic was forced to close.

At first, I was discouraged.

I did what the whisper instructed.

Practicing yoga poses helped me to gain flexibility, balance, and strength.

I read ancient works, particularly the Yoga Sutras of Patanjalian and the Hatha YogaPradipika, which I found very interesting.

My energy was gradually cleaned and increased as a result of the breathwork.

Meditation brought about a sense of serenity and inner awareness.

I’d shed 1,ooo pounds of emotional weight in the process.

I couldn’t understand how a body that had been so rigid and shattered could suddenly become so supple.

I hadn’t succumbed to cancer after all. Despite the fact that I couldn’t prove that yoga had healed me, I was still alive. See alsoHow Can I Improve My Self-Acceptance and Love Through the Use of Ayurveda?

2O15. CORONADO, CALIFORNIA

Inmeditation As I wake up this morning, my thoughts go back to the Afghan refugee camps, the filthy refugee hospital, and Mahmoud sleeping on his rusted bed. I have a clear view of the entire ward now. There’s an Afghan side to it. There is a Pakistani side. There is a loved one by each of the injured Afghans’ bedsides. They keep vigil by fingering their prayer beads and repeating mantras in Pashtu dialect. Nobody is on the side of the Pakistanis. They are mercenaries, as the name implies. They are estranged from their relatives.

  1. Shahwani’s medical enigma is as follows: It’s the force of love at work.
  2. According to research, when we feel supported by our loved ones, our bodies release a hormone called oxytocin, which reduces stress and aids in the process of recovery.
  3. We are made of love, and love is the essence of our soul, as well as the inner light to which yoga calls us.
  4. Love alters us—and those around us—in every way: physically, mentally, and spiritually.
  5. Morgan is now 17 years old, and we are still really close.
  6. See alsoMeet Nick Manci, a yoga instructor who assists veterans in discovering their inner warrior.

War reporter finds peace, recovery

The man behind the mask was Brad Willis, a tough-as-nails NBC News reporter who covered significant events in the Middle East, Asia/Africa/Latin America twenty years ago. After that, he suffered a back injury. The procedure was a failure. He was diagnosed with throat cancer, which was deadly. Today, he goes by the name of Bhava Ram, and he is 63 years old. He believes in yoga and the power of self-healing. ‘Warrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life,’ his latest book, is a narrative of his plunge into what he describes as “a dark place” of agony, over-medication, and despair, and how his 2-year-old son’s urgent appeal one day, ‘Get up, Daddy,’ spurred him on to a remarkable recovery.

  • During your time as a reporter, would you have believed a story like this if it had come to you from someone who looked like this?
  • Coming from a reliable source like me, as a journalistic colleague, I would agree.
  • Q: How did you manage to set aside your scepticism in order to embrace yoga and other forms of mind-body therapy?
  • I’d been told I wouldn’t make it, and I had this overwhelming need to be so much more than I was for my little baby as a result.
  • I wasn’t simply attempting to accept something that I was reading on an academic level; I was also experiencing it.
  • I could feel the stress leaving my body.
  • I was well aware of that.
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The fact that I was contributing to raising awareness of what was occurring across the world, especially whether I was conducting investigative reporting or reporting from war zones and crises, gave me a sense of accomplishment.

(/ Photograph courtesy of the author) Q: In your book, you relate a wonderful anecdote about how you essentially bluffed your way into your first television position in Eureka.

Q: Did that experience give you the impression that becoming a television journalist was something you were destined to do?

It was a pleasant sensation.

It never felt like a job to me, even when I was working.

A: Without a doubt.

I had a lot invested in it, about 20 years worth of investment in it, which was a long time.

Q: You mention in the book that you are in “the abyss.” Can you elaborate?

You’d had surgery as well as radiotherapy for throat cancer.

What was it about your son urging you to get up that struck such a deep chord with you?

When I was with my son, on the other hand, I wasn’t at that place.

Those three simple words jolted me out of my slumber.

Because I don’t have any respect for myself right now.

Q: When you first began out on your path, what did you find the most difficult?

Accepting cancer rather than combating it is a positive step.

Q: What was the pinnacle of your experience?

Perhaps it was simply a really effective visualization.

Q: You write in the book that a part of you — perhaps the cynical journalist part — was thinking to yourself that this was silly even as you were experiencing it.

A: It’s insane!

I’m telling a journalist from a major publication about it right now, in this place.

It was a component of my overall experience.

I’m just certain that took place.

What makes you believe that is the case?

I believe that the news industry, even more so than it was when I was a part of it, has degraded into a gotcha mindset, in which journalists are always seeking for a defect or a contradiction, and the result is a vast amount of finger-pointing in a variety of directions, as I have described.

Rather than discussing the integrity we may or may not possess in order to occupy a specific post, we are simply bringing each other down.

And I believe that this is because, if we all have poor self-esteem, one of the things that provides us with comfort is to watch others being pulled down.

Q: Can you tell me about your job?

When I’m interested in the news, I go online to big publications and perform a quick scan, just to make sure everything is up to date.

However, I do not watch the evening news.

I’ll keep an eye out if there’s a large event going on.

A: I don’t consider myself to be a mystic, a guru, or anything of the kind.

The lesson, I believe, is that no matter what you are going through in your life, you have more power than you realize.

With the ability to overcome huge hurdles and bring your entire potential into the world, you can achieve everything you set your mind to.

However, this is not the case for you. You are your own greatest healer. “Warrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life,” a personal essay by the author. by Brad Willis alias Bhava Ram, published by BenBella Books, 384 pages, $14.95 (paperback).

Warrior Pose, How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life, (Book By Brad Willis AKA Bhava Ram)

This trip chronicles some of the most significant events of our time through the eyes of a journalist, and it is also a remarkable narrative of the power of love between father and son, as well as a transforming path of self-healing, inner peace, and completeness. With a history that ranged from covering the Gulf War to investigating Colombian drug lords to living with freedom fighters in the mountains of Afghanistan, war journalist Brad Willis had become accustomed to taking calculated risks.

Willis was at the zenith of his profession when he had a fractured back and botched surgery, which rendered him permanently crippled and confined to a body brace for the rest of his life.

Friends flocked around Willis at his 50th birthday celebration, despite the fact that he was handicapped, nearly silent, miserable, hooked out on narcotic drugs, and on the verge of death.

Everyone was well aware that Willis was on his way out.

To serve as a sign of his journey, he adopted the spiritual name Bhava Ram, which is an acronym that means “Living from the Heart.” This trip chronicles some of the most significant events of our time through the eyes of a journalist, and it is also a remarkable narrative of the power of love between father and son, as well as a transforming path of self-healing, inner peace, and completeness.

The Culture of Make Believe (Book by Derrick Jensen)

This trip chronicles some of the most significant events of our time through the eyes of a journalist, and it is also a remarkable narrative of the power of love between father and son, as well as a transformative path towards self-healing, inner peace, and completeness.

For Brad Willis, risk was nothing new. From covering the front lines of the Gulf War to investigating Colombian drug lords to living with freedom fighters in the mountains of Afghanistan, risk was a way of life. However, when the moment of death arrived, it came from an unexpected source. After suffering a fractured back and a botched operation at the height of his professional career, Willis was rendered permanently crippled and sentenced to spend the rest of his life wearing a body brace. Next came the news that I had throat cancer, which was in its latter stages.

Willis learned the actual purpose of the party around half way through it: his pals were there to say farewell to him.

except his 2-year-old son, who pleaded with his father, “Get up, Daddy!

For his spiritual journey, he chose the name Bhava Ram, which means “Living from the Heart,” as a sign of his ascent.

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Warrior Pose by Brad Willis, Bhava Ram: 9781937856694

Warlord Poseis Indiana Jones merged with Gautama Buddha, a miraculous affirmation of the power of personal healing; it is at the same time a war story, a love story, and a spiritual journey of epic proportions.” “It is your story, my story, the human story. written in large print,” says the author. Emmett Miller, the father of Mind-Body Medicine, said it best: “Bhava Ram takes us on an incredible life journey filled with courage, passion, hope, despair, and a never-say-die attitude. ” Everyone seeking to find their path of well-being can benefit from his war stories, tender moments with his son, and transformative lifestyle.

Suhas G.

‘Warrior Posenot only takes us on an incredible journey through war zones and global crises, but it also takes us on an inner journey of profound self healing and personal transformation, which reminds us all of our own potential to access our inner power and live our truth.’ Editor-in-Chief of Los Angeles Yoga Magazine, Felicia Tomasko “This text is a treasure that can lead you into a new understanding about your life and how to live it fully, no matter who you are or what your challenges are.” Rebecca Tolin is a journalist.

Inspiring us to strive for greatness, this book serves as a bright beacon of practical wisdom and guidance, reminding us that we each possess an incredible capacity to achieve a more healthy and joyful life, as well as our most heartfelt dreams.” It is written in such a way that it will inspire you to soar.” — Rod Stryker, founder of Para Yoga “Remarkable recoveries and miraculous healings of cancers that were thought to be incurable.

Brad Willis has written the most exciting, original, and vividly relevant book on this subject that has been published to date.

David Weissman Warriors Pose is riveting, beautiful, informative, inspiring, compelling, honest, empathetic, and deeply moving to my heartstrings.

Furthermore, I will include it on my reading list for my History of Yoga course, which will take place next semester.

It has the feel of “The Autobiography of a(Modern) Yogi. ” the founder of Sanskrit Revolution, Marcy Braverman Goldstein In his struggle to break free from the prison of pain, he tells a compelling and often uplifting story that is well written. —ForeWord Reviews is a slang term for

Warrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life: Willis, Brad, Ram, Bhava: 9781937856694: Amazon.com: Books

Willis got his start in journalism by just going into a television station and interviewing for a position he had never applied for in the first place. His enthusiasm for the area was so intense that he worked as a foreign reporter for NBC for seven years, despite having a damaged vertebrae in his back. When the injuries ultimately took its toll on him, a botched spinal fusion exacerbated the matter further. With a diagnosis of terminal throat cancer thrown in for good measure, it’s easy to see why Willis resorted to the simple consolation of drugs and drink to dull his departure from the world.

See also:  How to Get Omega-3s As a Vegetarian: Hemp Seeds

Intriguing is Willis’ thorough and expert behind-the-scenes take on historical world battles.

Willis’ autobiography may prove to be an excellent resource for people wishing to make similar good changes in their own lives.

Review

Willis got his start in journalism by just going into a television station and interviewing for a position he had never applied for in the first place! His enthusiasm for the area was so intense that he worked as a foreign reporter for NBC for seven years, despite having a fractured vertebrae in one of his spine. A botched spinal fusion exacerbated the problem when the injury eventually took its toll on him. After being diagnosed with terminal throat cancer, it’s easy to see why Willis resorted to simple consolation like drugs and alcohol to ease his impending departure from this world at the time.

Willis’ in-depth and expert behind-the-scenes take on historical world events is intriguing to read about.

A great guidance for individuals wishing to make comparable beneficial adjustments in their lives, Willis’ memoir may prove to be an important resource.

Warrior Pose

With a history that ranged from covering the Gulf War to investigating Colombian drug lords to living with freedom fighters in the mountains of Afghanistan, war journalist Brad Willis had become accustomed to taking calculated risks. However, when the time came to face death, it came from an unexpected source. Willis was at the zenith of his profession when he had a fractured back and botched surgery, which rendered him permanently crippled and confined to a body brace for the rest of his life.

Friends flocked around Willis at his 50th birthday celebration, despite the fact that he was handicapped, nearly silent, miserable, hooked out on narcotic drugs, and on the verge of death.

Everyone was well aware that Willis was on his way out.

To serve as a sign of his journey, he adopted the spiritual name Bhava Ram, which is an acronym that stands for “Living from the Heart.”” In Warrior Pose, you will go on an adventure that will take you behind the scenes of some of the most important events of our time, as well as an incredible narrative of the power of love between a father and son and a transforming journey of self-healing, inner peace, and completeness.

How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life With Bhava Ram – The Melissa Ambrosini Show

(Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, or TuneIn to receive updates.) What would you do if you came across someone who had overcome enormous adversity, ranging from a broken back to terminal cancer, through addiction, post-traumatic traumatic stress disorder, and depression, but had managed to come out the other side with an abundance of grace and wisdom to share with you? So, let me tell you what I’d do: I’d ask as many questions (and absorb in as many lessons) as I possibly could! Bhava Ram, our podcast guest today, is a perfect example of how I approach a situation (formerly known as Brad Willis).

  • In the course of his career, he has gone from being a front-line journalist and war correspondent for NBC (and winning the Alfred I.
  • This is a man who has genuinely been through it all and has come out the other side ready to serve the country.
  • He has made a significant difference in both of our lives.
  • Prepare yourself for a flurry of serious inspiration and insight, because it will hit you hard and quick!

In this episode we chat about:

  • In this episode, we discuss how he transitioned from being a Type A overachiever to a yogi (and what it’s like to entirely change one’s identity) (05:53)
  • (14:17) The dark demons that visited him when he was at the recovery clinic
  • 21:21 describes how he overcame cancer as well as a damaged back, despair, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder. How getting up early in the morning helped Bhava cure his body (this is an unbelievable story!) (23:58)
  • Describes how Bhava’s doctor responded to his recovery (26:56)
  • 28:11 outlines the everyday routines that anybody desiring healing and transformation must do. Which guru is the most knowledgeable and effective on the earth, and why you should pay attention to them (29:41)
  • It is possible to produce an abundance of health, prosperity, and love in your life by using the power of mantra (37:05). How Bhava handles with fear when it arises today (I really like these suggestions! (39:51)
  • The single most important component in your development and evolution (and it is not what you believe) (51:40)
  • Plus a whole lot more

Episode resources:

  • A few other resources are Warrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life by Brad Willis AKA Bhava Ram (Amazon), Laura Plumb (website), Dr. Emmett Miller on iTunes (podcast), and Dr. Emmett Miller on YouTube. The Yoga Sutras of Patajaliby Edwin F. Bryant (Amazon)
  • Your Book Now (Become an author in 8 easy lessons) (website)
  • The Yoga Sutras of Patajaliby Edwin F. Bryant (Amazon)

A few other resources are Warrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life by Brad Willis AKA Bhava Ram (Amazon), Laura Plumb (website), Dr. Emmett Miller on iTunes (podcast), and Dr. Emmett Miller on YouTube (videos and podcasts). Among the books available are The Yoga Sutras of Patajaliby by Edwin F. Bryant (Amazon); Your Book Now (Become an author in 8 easy lessons) (website); and The Yoga Sutras of Patajaliby by Edwin F. Bryant (Kindle).

Book review: Warrior Pose by Bhava Ram

Bhava Ram, my yoga instructor, is shown on the cover of the book. NBC News journalist Brad Willis was who he was before he became Bhava Ram, and he was who he was before I met him. War Correspondent’s Memoir, Warrior Pose: A War Correspondent’s Journey, describes his rehabilitation from an agonizing broken back, drug detoxification, throat cancer, and a total recovery from the most remote and hazardous areas on the planet. At its core, the novel is a love story that is half adventure narrative, part spiritual quest.

  1. Many individuals who read this book will talk about Bhava’s incredible adventure, which is well documented.
  2. He has made an incredible trip from there—a million-dollar apartment with a view of sparkling Hong Kong—through a terrible back injury, drug addiction, and a terminal cancer diagnosis to become the guy shown on the book’s cover.
  3. In Dispatches, he chronicles his trip from a little Northern California TV station to the mountains of Afghanistan, where he encounters mujahadeen, apartheid, Colombian drug battles, North Korea, and other issues.
  4. Several times throughout the reading, my mouth dropped as this calm man I knew from yoga class covered some of the most important tales of the late twentieth century.
  5. When I inquired as to what his mantra was at the moment, he did not hesitate to respond.
  6. He continued to charge until his back gave way, forcing him to return home to San Diego for a spinal fusion.

In light of my own personal experience with an exact replica of this injury (a fracture at L5/S1 and a crushed disc), I read this section with a mixture of amazement and resonance, recalling the agony of that injury as well as the experience of undergoing a similar surgery while wearing a brace for three months.

  1. Willis felt dejected at the end of Section Two: The Abyss.
  2. Willis is very transparent and unafraid in this portion, with no attempt to conceal his heinous actions or feelings of self-pity.
  3. That all changed when Morgan was two years old and made a simple request of his father, who obliged.
  4. Willis couldn’t “get up” because he was enslaved by medications, paralyzed by agony, and at least 50 pounds overweight.
  5. Willis eventually discovered yoga (Section Three: Yoga), and in this section, he describes in great detail how he arranged his life with the purpose of healing for those who are coping with life issues.
  6. And gently but steadily, he began to resemble the man on the cover.
  7. He changed his name to “Pure State of Being in the Heart,” and that is exactly how I have experienced him in my life.
  8. It was this love, more than anything else, more than his love for his first wife, or his love for his career, or even his own love for himself, that motivated him to find a way to cure himself and his family.

This is a book for dads, as well as for adventurers and people who are in need of recovery. However, it is also a novel intended for boys. Spam is reduced on this website by the usage of Akismet. Learn more about how your comment data is handled. a link to the page’s load

Executive #Bookshelf : Warrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life – Brad Willis @Bhava_Ram ‏ — TOM VRANAS

With a history that ranged from covering the Gulf War to investigating Colombian drug lords to living with freedom fighters in the mountains of Afghanistan, war journalist Brad Willis had become accustomed to taking calculated risks. However, when the time came to face death, it came from an unexpected source. Willis was at the zenith of his profession when he had a fractured back and botched surgery, which rendered him permanently crippled and confined to a body brace for the rest of his life.

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Friends flocked around Willis at his 50th birthday celebration, despite the fact that he was handicapped, nearly silent, miserable, hooked out on narcotic drugs, and on the verge of death.

Everyone was well aware that Willis was on his way out.

To serve as a sign of his journey, he adopted the spiritual name Bhava Ram, which is an acronym that means “Living from the Heart.” This trip chronicles some of the most significant events of our time through the eyes of a journalist, and it is also a remarkable narrative of the power of love between father and son, as well as a transforming path of self-healing, inner peace, and completeness.

Tom’s Take:

I had been suffering from chronic back pain for a long time – like most business people, I spend hours upon hours at my desk, crouched over my computer, books, and printed reports, among other things. I needed to find a way to keep my physical shape in sync with my work ethic, and I needed to do so quickly. Over and over again in the press and on social media, yoga has been hailed as a miraculous healer — both physically and psychologically as well as emotionally. I’ve found myself to be a regular practitioner of hot yoga, and I’ve never felt better in my life.

After spending time on the verge of death, my story will hopefully motivate readers to at the very least give yoga a try!

Warrior Pose How Yoga Literally Saved My Life: Brad Willis, Bhava Ram: Trade Paperback: 9781937856694: Powell’s Books

With a history that ranged from covering the Gulf War to investigating Colombian drug lords to living with freedom fighters in the mountains of Afghanistan, war journalist Brad Willis had become accustomed to taking calculated risks. However, when the time came to face death, it came from an unexpected source. Willis was at the zenith of his profession when he had a fractured back and botched surgery, which rendered him permanently crippled and confined to a body brace for the rest of his life.

Friends flocked around Willis at his 50th birthday celebration, despite the fact that he was handicapped, nearly silent, miserable, hooked out on narcotic drugs, and on the verge of death.

Everyone was well aware that Willis was on his way out.

To serve as a sign of his journey, he adopted the spiritual name Bhava Ram, which is an acronym that means “Living from the Heart.” This epic voyage chronicles some of the most monumental events in our history through the eyes of a journalist, yet it is also an amazing narrative of the power of love between a father and son, as well as an inward journey of self-discovery, inner peace, and completeness.

Review

“Remarkable recoveries and miraculous healings of cancer patients who had been diagnosed as incurable Brad Willis has authored the most fascinating, creative, and vividly relevant book on this subject that has been published thus far. Because of its compact and hard-hitting style, it is a page-turner about the surprisingly bleak reality behind the nightly news, as revealed to a top television reporter.” Candace Pert, PhD, is the Chief Scientific Officer of RAPID Laboratories, Inc. and the author of Everything You Need to Know to Feel Go(o)dand Feelings of Joy.

David Weissman

Review

It’s Indiana Jones crossed with Gautama Buddha in a miracle demonstration of the power of self-healing. It’s also a love tale and epic spiritual journey of epic proportions, all wrapped up in a compelling saga of conflict and love. It is your tale, it is my story, it is the story of humanity. “It’s written in big letters.” Dr. Emmett Miller was a pioneer in the field of mind-body medicine. Bhava Ram takes us through an incredible life journey filled with courage, passion, hope, despair, and a never-say-die attitude.

Dr.

Kshirsagar, Director of Ayurvedic Healing at California Integrative Medicine, is an expert in the field.

It is written in such a way that it will inspire you to soar.” Rod Stryker, founder of Para Yoga “Remarkable recoveries and miraculous healings of cancer patients who had been diagnosed as incurable Brad Willis has authored the most fascinating, creative, and vividly relevant book on this subject that has been published to date.

and the author of Everything You Need to Know to Feel Go(o)dand Feelings of Joy.

I highly recommend it.

Furthermore, I will include it on my reading list for my History of Yoga course, which will take place next semester.

ForeWord Reviews are a type of review that is written in the first person.

About the Author

Brad Willis, often known as Brad Pitt, is an American actor who is best known for his role as Brad Pitt in the film Brad Pitt. Bhava Ramis is a former NBC News war journalist who has covered conflicts in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and other parts of the world. For his reporting from inside Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation, he was awarded the coveted Alfred I. duPont Award, which is regarded the broadcast equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize. Ayurvedic sister sciences Yoga and Ayurveda are the subjects of his current research.

He is the creator of Deep Yoga, which is situated in San Diego, and the author of two prior publications.

Radio Enso #126 with Bhava Ram- Warrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Life

Come with me. On Monday, May 19, at 6 p.m. Pacific/9 p.m. Eastern, Radio Enso will broadcast. Bhava Ram, a former NBC war journalist (Brad Willis) who recovered a broken back and stage four cancer via Yoga and Mind/Body/Spirit healing, will be my guest on this episode of the podcast. He is the creator of Deep Yoga, which is situated in San Diego, and he conducts seminars and leads retreats all across the United States and India. During his visit, he’ll chat about his new bookWarrior Pose: How Yoga (Literally) Saved My Lifeas well as a variety of other topics.

  1. In addition to being extensively drugged and restrained by a body brace, he had been declared permanently incapacitated.
  2. Ram was on the verge of death when he decided to abandon western medicine, detoxify from all drugs, and seek mind-body healing.
  3. As a consequence of his commitment to spreading the miracle of self-healing, Bhava and his wife, Laura Plumb, launched Deep Yoga and The Deep Yoga School of Healing Arts, which are still in operation today.
  4. He is a keynote speaker at major medical executive conferences and has vast experience in executive coaching and mentoring.

Warrior Pose

With a history that ranged from covering the Gulf War to investigating Colombian drug lords to living with freedom fighters in the mountains of Afghanistan, war journalist Brad Willis had become accustomed to taking calculated risks. However, when the time came to face death, it came from an unexpected source. Willis was at the zenith of his profession when he had a fractured back and botched surgery, which rendered him permanently crippled and confined to a body brace for the rest of his life.

Friends flocked around Willis at his 50th birthday celebration, despite the fact that he was handicapped, nearly silent, miserable, hooked out on narcotic drugs, and on the verge of death.

Everyone was well aware that Willis was on his way out.

To serve as a sign of his journey, he adopted the spiritual name Bhava Ram, which is an acronym that stands for “Living from the Heart.”” In Warrior Pose, you will go on an adventure that will take you behind the scenes of some of the most important events of our time, as well as an incredible narrative of the power of love between a father and son and a transforming journey of self-healing, inner peace, and completeness.

#400 – A War Correspondent’s Memoir of Yoga Healing with Brad Willis (Bhava Ram)

Transcript Brad Willis (as Bhava Ram) is the author of the critically praised new book on the healing powers of Yoga and mind/body medicine: The Healing Powers of Yoga and Mind/Body Medicine. Warriors Pose, and How Yoga Almost Saved My Life Bhava, a former NBC network news war journalist, was able to recover herself from stage four cancer and a damaged back by practicing Yoga. He now spends his life to spreading the miracle of self-healing to as many people as possible, believing passionately that we all possess the innate ability to take control of our lives, heal ourselves, and bring about long-lasting personal transformation in our own lives.

Trauma in times of crisis: identification, assessment, and treatment (15 CEUs) Neuroscience and Healing are two topics that I am interested in (8 CEUs) NEW!

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David Van Nuys, Ph.D.

2014 is the year of the copyright.

is a researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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