Yoga for Metabolic Syndrome

Yoga for metabolic syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Background The metabolic syndrome is the most major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in both adults and children. Specifically, the goal of this research was to carefully examine and conduct a meta-analysis on the effects of yoga on indicators associated with the metabolic syndrome. Methods In this study, we searched and evaluated the databases MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Studies, and IndMED from their creation to the 8th of March, 2016, seeking randomised controlled trials on yoga for individuals with metabolic syndrome.

Results It was decided to include seven studies with a total of 794 individuals in total.

However, yoga was found to be superior to usual care for waist circumference (standardised mean difference (SMD) = -0.35; 95 percent confidence interval (CI) = -0.57 to -0.13; p0.01) and systolic blood pressure (SMD = 0.29 These effects, on the other hand, were not protected against selection bias.

Conclusion On the basis of the findings of this meta-analysis, there can be no advice for or against the practice of yoga in order to impact the parameters of the metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, hypertension, meta-analysis, review, waist circumference, and yoga are some of the terms used.

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Yoga as a complementary therapy for metabolic syndrome: A narrative review

A sedentary and stressful lifestyle are connected with the development of metabolic syndrome (MS), which disproportionately affects underactive adults. Yoga is widely regarded as a low-impact, mind-body stress-relieving activity, and experts are increasingly focusing their attention on the advantages of yoga for the management of metabolic diseases, according to a recent study. For physicians and other health-care providers, it is also critical to understand the therapeutic efficacy of yoga intervention, including the kind, duration, and frequency of yoga sessions, on a variety of MS risk factors.

We searched the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Library from their origin until December 2019, using the keywords “metabolic syndrome,” “diabetes,” “cardiovascular illnesses,” “obesity,” and “yoga.” We found a total of 61 articles.

Research and well-designed studies with better standards of methodology and that analyze yoga’s long-term effects on multiple sclerosis are required in order to make more certain conclusions.

Cardiovascular disorders; diabetes; metabolic syndrome; obesity; yoga are some of the terms used in this article. 2020 Shanghai Changhai Hospital Copyright Protection. Elsevier B.V. is the publisher. All intellectual property rights are retained.

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How yoga can help to manage metabolic syndrome

The body and mind are said to gain from yoga by those who practice it — known as “yogis” in the Western culture — who are often gushing about how yoga is beneficial to their health. But what does the scientific community have to say? This is the subject of a new study, which focuses on the effects of yoga on persons who have metabolic syndrome. Pin it to your Pinterest board. Although not everyone is capable of standing on their heads, practicing yoga on a daily basis can have a positive impact on our cardiometabolic health.

  1. Yoga, for example, has been shown to increase brain health and cognition, as well as to alleviate the symptoms of depression and to treat thyroid disorders in certain studies.
  2. As a result, it appears that yoga is beneficial for practically everything.
  3. New research published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine, on the other hand, suggests otherwise.
  4. Parco M.
  5. The findings not only demonstrated that it is beneficial to those suffering from metabolic syndrome, but they also highlighted the processes that underpin these advantages.
  6. In the United States, it is believed that around 34% of the adult population suffers from the illness, according to statistics.
  7. Siu and his colleagues previously performed study in which they discovered that people who practiced yoga for a year had lower blood pressure and a smaller waist circumference than those who did not.
  8. Accordingly, they divided 97 volunteers who had metabolic syndrome and high-normal blood pressure into two groups, one of which received yoga instruction and the other which did not.
  9. “Results revealed that 1-year yoga instruction lowered proinflammatory adipokines and enhanced anti-inflammatory adipokines in persons with and without high-normal blood pressure,” the study’s authors write in their conclusion.
  10. “Yoga has been shown to be useful in managing.” The findings of the study imply that yoga may be a beneficial lifestyle intervention for patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, since it has been shown to reduce inflammation and assist them in managing their symptoms.

Doctor Siu also commented on the study’s findings, saying, “These findings contribute to the understanding of how adipokines respond to long-term yoga training, which underlines the relevance of regular exercise to human health.”

Yoga Benefits Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

According to a research recently published in the Scandinavian Journal of MedicineScience in Sports, one year of yoga instruction lowered pro-inflammatory adipokines and elevated an anti-inflammatory adipokine in persons with metabolic syndrome and high-normal blood pressure. In a study lead by Parco Siu from the University of Hong Kong, researchers found that lifestyle modification is the most effective treatment for individuals with metabolic syndrome. Yoga is a combination of physical activity, regulated breathing, and relaxation practice.

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The researchers analyzed data from 97 Hong Kong Chinese patients with MetS and high-normal blood pressure who were randomly allocated to either a control group (n = 45) or a yoga group (n = 52).

Participants in the control group did not get any treatment, but they were called once a month to check on their health.

“The sera of the subjects were collected and tested for adipokines,” the authors explain.

GEE analyses demonstrated statistically significant interaction effects between one-year time and yoga intervention for the reductions in leptin and chemerin concentrations in the sera analyzed, as well as the rise in adiponectin concentration in the sera investigated.” In light of these findings, the authors argue that this study demonstrates yoga’s health advantages in those suffering from metabolic syndrome.

“These findings support the notion that yoga exercise may be an effective lifestyle intervention to reduce chronic inflammation by downregulating the proinflammatory adipokines and upregulating the anti-inflammatory adipokines in individuals with high-normal blood pressure and Metabolic Syndrome,” the researchers wrote.

Effects of Yoga on Metabolic Syndrome – Full Text View – ClinicalTrials.gov

The following are the primary outcome measures:

  1. Change in the circumference of the waist waist circumference is defined in its operational sense as a measurement of circumference around one’s midsection. When it comes to detecting central obesity, this is one of the most widely utilized indicators. The waist circumference will be measured with the use of a tape measure with a metric scale. It will be necessary to find the upper hip bone in order to measure the waist circumference, after which a measuring tape will be wrapped around the abdomen. The tape measure will be horizontal, and the measuring tape will not be tight, but it will not cause compressions on the skin, as described above. The difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure An electronic blood pressure monitor will be used to assess the subject’s resting blood pressure after he or she has taken a 15-minute break in the laboratory setting. The cuff will be placed over the brachial artery area at the level of the heart, and the systolic and diastolic blood pressures will be taken. Variation in blood glucose levels The levels of glucose and insulin in a venous blood sample obtained after an overnight fast will be measured and reported. Subjects will be requested to go to the laboratory after fasting for about 10 hours during the course of the night. In order to gather resting blood samples, individuals will be asked to sit in a calm area for 15 minutes prior to blood collection for each sampling. Antecubital vein in the forearm will be used to extract a total of ten milliliters of venous blood. An authorized nurse or medical lab technologist will collect the blood samples. The procedure will take around 30 minutes. In order to prevent blood clots from forming once venous blood samples have been collected, blood samples will be discharged into a lithium heparin plastic tube after collection. Following centrifugation to extract plasma samples, the remaining whole blood will be kept at -80°C in a freezer until being tested for glucose levels. Triglyceride levels fluctuate. Antecubital vein in the forearm will be used to extract a total of ten milliliters of venous blood. An authorized nurse or medical lab technologist will collect the blood samples. The procedure will take around 30 minutes. In order to prevent blood clots from forming once venous blood samples have been collected, blood samples will be discharged into a lithium heparin plastic tube after collection. Following centrifugation to extract plasma samples, the remaining whole blood will be kept at -80°C in a freezer until it is time to conduct the triacylglyceridaemia test. Lipoproteins have changed. An authorized nurse or medical lab technologist will collect the blood samples. The procedure will take around 30 minutes. In order to prevent blood clots from forming once venous blood samples have been collected, blood samples will be discharged into a lithium heparin plastic tube after collection. It is planned to measure the amount of HDL-C in the venous blood samples that have been obtained. Change in the circumference of the waist waist circumference is defined in its operational sense as a measurement of circumference around one’s midsection. When it comes to detecting central obesity, this is one of the most widely utilized indicators. The waist circumference will be measured with the use of a tape measure with a metric scale. It will be necessary to find the upper hip bone in order to measure the waist circumference, after which a measuring tape will be wrapped around the abdomen. The tape measure will be horizontal, and the measuring tape will not be tight, but it will not cause compressions on the skin, as described above. Variation in systolic and diastolic blood pressure An electronic blood pressure monitor will be used to assess the subject’s resting blood pressure after he or she has taken a 15-minute break in the laboratory setting. The cuff will be placed over the brachial artery area at the level of the heart, and the systolic and diastolic blood pressures will be taken. Variation in blood glucose levels The levels of glucose and insulin in a venous blood sample obtained after an overnight fast will be measured and reported. Subjects will be requested to go to the laboratory after fasting for about 10 hours during the course of the night. In order to gather resting blood samples, individuals will be asked to sit in a calm area for 15 minutes prior to blood collection for each sampling. Antecubital vein in the forearm will be used to extract a total of ten milliliters of venous blood. An authorized nurse or medical lab technologist will collect the blood samples. The procedure will take around 30 minutes. In order to prevent blood clots from forming once venous blood samples have been collected, blood samples will be discharged into a lithium heparin plastic tube after collection. Following centrifugation to extract plasma samples, the remaining whole blood will be kept at -80°C in a freezer until being tested for glucose levels. Triglyceride levels fluctuate. Antecubital vein in the forearm will be used to extract a total of ten milliliters of venous blood. An authorized nurse or medical lab technologist will collect the blood samples. The procedure will take around 30 minutes. In order to prevent blood clots from forming once venous blood samples have been collected, blood samples will be discharged into a lithium heparin plastic tube after collection. Following centrifugation to extract plasma samples, the remaining whole blood will be kept at -80°C in a freezer until it is time to conduct the triacylglyceridaemia test. Lipoproteins have changed. An authorized nurse or medical lab technologist will collect the blood samples. The procedure will take around 30 minutes. In order to prevent blood clots from forming once venous blood samples have been collected, blood samples will be discharged into a lithium heparin plastic tube after collection. It is planned to measure the amount of HDL-C in the venous blood samples that have been obtained.

Secondary outcome measures include the following:

  1. Stress and sadness levels indicated by the participants have changed. Self-reported stress and depression levels are recommended as secondary outcome measures since yoga intervention has the potential to reduce stress and depression levels, which in turn may have good impacts on MetS parameters indirectly. In this study, the indicator of stress level will be used to measure the mental health of the participants. The Patton Type A personality profile will be used to assess the amount of stress in the organization. It will be necessary to measure the amount of depression experienced by the individuals using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Stress and sadness levels as stated by the participants have changed. Self-reported stress and depression levels are recommended as secondary outcome measures since yoga intervention has the potential to reduce stress and depression levels, which in turn may have good impacts on MetS parameters indirectly. In this study, the indicator of stress level will be used to measure the mental health of the participants. The Patton Type A personality profile will be used to assess the amount of stress in the organization. It will be necessary to measure the amount of depression experienced by the individuals using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D).
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Yoga for a Metabolic Makeover

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. Taking Kundalini Yoga courses was a way for Kim Innes to decompress after hard days in the laboratory. She began taking sessions 20 years ago. Today, she is able to combine her love of yoga with her interest in science. The effects of yoga on chronic illness are being investigated by Innes, who is an assistant professor at the University of Virginia Health Systems’ Center for the Study of Complementary and Alternative Therapies (CSCAT).

” To say that her attention was “piqued” would be an understatement.

She published the most complete review on yoga and metabolic syndrome to date last year, which is still in print. It was important for her to discover an alternate method to controlling and avoiding these illnesses, particularly for women, she explains.

A Deadly Trifecta

The situation is as follows: Innes categorizes the conditions that come within the “metabolic syndrome” diagnostic as a whole. Due to the fact that all of its associated diseases — abdominal obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and insulin resistance are tied to the body’s metabolism, the syndrome is termed as such. A person who demonstrates three or more of these characteristics is deemed to have the condition. According to the American Heart Association, it affects 50 million people in the United States, and the number is increasing in lockstep with the country’s expanding waistlines.

All of the components of metabolic syndrome travel together, feed off each other’s harmful behaviors, and generally wreak havoc on the body, much like members of a dysfunctional clique.

Cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes are three of the most devastating diseases of the twenty-first century, and metabolic syndrome is a one-way ticket to them.

Insulin Insurrection

Insulin’s function in the body is meticulously planned and orchestrated. During the digestion and breakdown of food, the pancreas produces insulin, which is released into the circulation to assist cells in converting the energy (glucose) in the meal into fuel. When bodies are padded with excess pounds, however, the procedure goes awry and the process fails. The presence of fat tissue, particularly around the belly, reduces the body’s ability to respond to insulin. Because the body is unable to utilize insulin properly, it requires more insulin than the pancreas is capable of producing.

  1. When there is insufficient insulin to control blood sugar, glucose accumulates in the circulation.
  2. Surprisingly, over half of the adult population in the United States is affected by prediabetes, a disease in which blood glucose levels are higher than usual.
  3. However, the outlook does not have to be gloomy.
  4. The fact that yoga has slimming effects makes sense in terms of its potential role in treating insulin resistance and, consequently, metabolic syndrome (see box).

Yoga to the Rescue

The fact that yoga was widely practiced in India for illnesses related with insulin resistance, such as diabetes and hypertension, was not lost on Innes’ mind. Because she was interested in whether the technique may prevent the advancement of metabolic syndrome into chronic disease, she began on a search for clinical proof. Innes discovered 70 solid, if tiny, studies on the influence of yoga on the illnesses of the metabolic syndrome while sifting through mountains of material, much of it published in Indian publications.

“They are all intertwined,” says the author.

Finally, but certainly not least, she discovered a link between yoga and weight loss.

According to Innes, although the specific mechanism by which yoga alleviates metabolic syndrome is still unknown at this time, the stress alleviation and emotions of well-being engendered by a regular yoga practice are thought to help regulate the neurological system.

According to her, “Even the short-term interventions—some of which were as brief as nine days—had profound benefits on the symptoms of metabolic syndrome.” “It was a real eye opener.”

The Stress Connection

Across the country, researchers were conducting their own investigations into how yoga may impact signs of the metabolic syndrome, which they called the metabolic syndrome. In 2010, while examining an Indian paper for her residency, Alka Kanaya, an internist at the University of California, San Francisco, made the link for herself. Kanaya is interested in how people retain fat and how this has an influence on their overall health. Women who are subjected to continuous stress produce hormones that lead their bodies to store fat around their midsections.

A physique with an apple form, according to Kanaya, is strongly related with metabolic syndrome (MS).

When you mention performing yoga for weight reduction, most people immediately envision rows of yogis sweating their way through a Bikram or Ashtanga session.

Unlike the fat that accumulates on the thighs and buttocks, which gives the appearance of a pear-shaped figure, abdominal fat is inextricably related to psychological stress.

Body Burden

Even while the thought of relaxing as a weight-loss approach seems suitable for a one-liner from Jay Leno, the concept really has some scientific basis. The way it works is as follows: Chronic stress causes the body to produce an excessive amount of cortisol, which is the body’s major stress hormone. Cortisol is a stress hormone that has an effect on both the adrenal glands and the immune system. In the end, the elevated cortisol causes the belly to open its fat depots, causing it to store more fat than it would have normally stored.

“By lowering stress, you’ll immediately be placing less weight on your abdomen,” Kanaya explains.

Generally speaking, when people think about yoga, they envision challenging poses that are inaccessible to those who have excess body fat, according to Kanaya.

Healing Through “Real” Rest

Restorative yoga, according to Lasater, is a method to address a yawning void in the national psyche—a collective incapacity to rest. According to her, most Americans confuse relaxing with vegging out in front of the television: “That’s not restful; that’s uninteresting.” Due to the emphasis placed on supported postures in restorative yoga, the body is able to achieve the deep, restful state that it desires. According to Lasater, the body begins to mend itself as soon as the agitation is removed from it.

Yoga, according to Dr.

According to him, “We know that meditation is useful in controlling metabolic syndrome, but meditation is extremely difficult for the majority of Americans.” “Yoga is the next best thing to having that Zen experience,” says the author.

When you relax your joints, you create a metaphor that encourages the rest of your body to relax as well.

But, after all, aren’t all yoga methods calming? Lasater believes that any kind of yoga is preferable to none at all, but she believes that modern yoga has lost touch with its restorative roots. “Restorative yoga is a structured method of encouraging individuals to just pause and be.”

4 Ways to Relax

The following positions are recommended by Judith Hanson Lasater, who worked with researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, to develop a yoga curriculum that was utilized in a study of yoga and metabolic syndrome.

Reclining Twist with a Bolster

Place your right hip near to the end of the bolster while sitting on the floor. Make a bending motion with your knees and slide your foot to the left so that the outside of your right leg rests on the floor. You can either place your left leg on top of your right leg or leave a gap between the two of them. In this position, you should turn to the right and place your hands on the floor, one on either side of the bolster. Make a gentle pressing motion with your hands against the floor to stretch your frontal torso.

Place your arms on the floor in a comfortable position.

Alternate sides.

Elevated Legs-up-the-Wall Pose

Placing your right hip at the end of the bolster can help you sit more comfortably. Make a bending motion with your knees and slide your feet to the left so that the outside of your right leg rests on the ground. You can either place your left leg on top of your right leg or leave a gap between the two of you. Turn to your right and place your hands on the floor, one on either side of the bolster. Turn to your left and repeat. Using your hands, gently press into the floor in an attempt to stretch the front of your body.

Put your arms on the floor so that they are comfortable.

Make a 180-degree 180-degree turn

Basic Relaxation

Make sure you have enough space on the floor to stretch out. Before you lie down, lay a standard-fold blanket over your shoulders to provide support for your head and neck. Begin by taking a seat on the floor. After that, turn to one side and lean on your elbow and forearm as you glide across to the other side of the room. Make a fetal position on your back. As a bonus, coming into the position in this manner is less taxing on your back.) Make a little roll along the long edge of the blanket to help support the curve of your neck.

The angle between your chin and your forehead should be somewhat lower than your forehead.

Reclining Supported Pose

Place a yoga block on the floor and place the end of a bolster on top of it to support yourself. Add a single-fold blanket to one end of the bed to provide support for your head. Next, fold up two blankets into a single roll and store them nearby for convenience. In order to support each elbow and forearm, place two extra wrapped blankets on either side of the bolster to provide additional support. Situate yourself in front of the short side of the bolster, with your tailbone pressing on the bolster.

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Take a deep breath and relax with your torso resting on the bolster and your head resting on the single-fold blanket.

Allow your legs and feet to splay out so that your heels rest on the ground.

Place your forearms on the blankets at your sides, palms facing up, and rest your head on them. Close your eyes and keep them closed for at least 10 minutes after that. Catherine Guthrie is a writer based in the Indiana city of Bloomington.

Can Yoga Practice Reduce Obesity And Metabolic Syndrome?

Do you think a year of yoga practice can help you lose weight or minimize the signs and symptoms of metabolic syndrome?

Type of Study

Randomized control trial (RCT) in clinical research

Study Participants (Sample)

The sample size is 79 people. Participants in the study:

  • Female and man of 58.8 years old
  • Both female and male All of the research participants were classified as clinically obese.

Methods

The levels of metabolic peptides in blood serum extracted from research participants who completed one year of three-times-week yoga practice were compared to the levels of metabolic peptides in blood serum retrieved from a control group who did not participate in yoga.

Results

When comparing the yoga therapy group to the control group, it was shown that many indicators of metabolic syndrome, including waist circumference, resting heart rate, and levels of four metabolic peptides, were favourably altered.

Conclusion

Following a year of yoga practice, indicators of metabolic syndrome were found to be improved, and waist circumference was shown to be lowered. This shows that practicing yoga can assist to prevent metabolic syndrome and can also aid to reduce obesity levels in the body.

Background

Dietary management of the metabolic syndrome is a term used to refer to a combination of diseases that, when combined, can be a precursor to type-2 diabetes as well as heart disease and stroke. Clinical obesity and the metabolic syndrome are frequently related with one another. The presence of specific substances in the body that are involved in metabolism, known as metabolic peptides, can provide some insight into whether or not a person is suffering from metabolic syndrome, according to research.

Research question

In medicine, metabolic syndrome is a term used to describe a combination of diseases that, when combined, can be a precursor to type-2 diabetes and have been linked to heart disease and stroke. Clinical obesity and the metabolic syndrome are frequently related. The presence of specific substances in the body that are involved in metabolism, known as metabolic peptides, can provide clues as to whether or not a person is suffering from metabolic syndrome, according to research.

Research methods

Participants were randomized to either the yoga treatment group or the control group in a random fashion by the study team. For one hour each session, the yoga therapy group engaged in a hatha yoga asana practice three times weekly. Yoga practices were taught by a yoga instructor, and participants worked in small groups of around 10 people per group to perfect their poses. If any of the individuals had previous yoga experience prior to participating in the study, this was not mentioned in the research article.

Those who were in the control group did not practice yoga.

A comparison of the treatment and control groups was made using indications of metabolic syndrome (such as beta-cell function, insulin resistance, levels of four metabolic peptides, and insulin level) to see whether there were any changes between them.

They looked at the concentrations of specific bodily compounds that they had extracted from human blood serum. After one year of yoga treatment, they took serum from the subjects once more for testing and analysis.

Results

Participants were allocated to either the yoga treatment group or the control group in a random fashion by the study’s researchers. Hatha yoga asana practice was done three times per week for one hour by the yoga therapy group. In each yoga session, participants worked in small groups of around ten people under the guidance and direction of a yoga instructor. If any of the individuals had prior yoga experience before to participating in the study, this was not mentioned in the research publication.

There was no yoga practiced by those in the control group Everyone who took part in the study was in their mid-forties (58.8 years old) and considered clinically obese.

They looked at the concentrations of specific bodily compounds that they had extracted from blood serum.

Why is this relevant to yoga practitioners?

Adding to the growing amount of evidence demonstrating that yoga provides health and wellness advantages beyond just developing muscular strength and flexibility, this work makes a significant contribution to the field. Because of the general sedentary nature of our lives, along with the time constraints we frequently experience as a result of our hectic work and personal schedules, we may make less than ideal lifestyle choices in terms of diet and activity. Obesity and metabolic syndrome have risen to the level of severe public health concern as a result of such lifestyle choices.

It is hoped that the findings of this study would be helpful to persons who are trying to control metabolic syndrome and/or obesity.

However, the fact that yoga practice was shown to be able to offset several markers of metabolic syndrome and obesity is positive.

Reference citation

Yu, A.P., F.N. Ugwu, B.T. Tam, P.H. Lee, C.W. Lai, C.S.C. Wong, W.W. Larn, S. Sheridan, and P.M. Siu. Yu, A.P., F.N. Ugwu, B.T. Tam, and P.H. Lee. 2018. Yoga training for one year has been shown to change the ghrelin axis in centrally obese people with metabolic syndrome. Frontiers in Physiology, Volume 9, Issue 1321.

Restorative Yoga in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Trial

Context: Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Yoga has been shown to enhance various metabolic indicators in healthy individuals, but it has not been examined in those who have metabolic syndrome. Our study examined whether or whether a restorative yoga intervention was practical and acceptable in underactive, overweight persons with metabolic syndrome who were underactive and overweight before to the study. In this study, 26 underactive, overweight adult men and women with metabolic syndrome were randomly assigned to either 15 90-minute yoga sessions spread over 10 weeks or to a wait-list control group.

  • The acceptability of the proposal was determined through an interview and surveys.
  • Results: A total of 280 participants were evaluated by phone, and 93 people were invited to a screening visit because they had a high risk of having metabolic syndrome.
  • Yoga class attendance exceeded our expectations, as did the consistency of home practice.
  • In the yoga group, there was a tendency toward lower blood pressure (p= 0.07), a statistically significant rise in energy level (p0.009), and tendencies toward improved well-being (p0.12) and stress (p0.22) when compared to the control.

Restorative yoga was found to be a practical and acceptable intervention for overweight people with metabolic syndrome. It is necessary to conduct a bigger randomized controlled study in order to determine whether yoga is effective in improving metabolic parameters in this population.

Restorative Yoga for Therapy of the Metabolic Syndrome (RHYTHMS) study

In addition to visceral adiposity and insulin resistance, other metabolic disorders such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia can arise simultaneously and are related with an excessive caloric intake and insufficient physical exercise. A total of 66 percent of American adults are overweight, with over half of all obese people meeting the criteria for the’metabolic syndrome,’ which significantly raises the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although lifestyle and behavioral treatments can help to lower these risks, many people who are at high risk for metabolic disease find it difficult to lose weight and raise their physical activity levels and keep them there.

The results of a recent evaluation of the effect of yoga on cardiovascular risk factors discovered that it can have a favorable influence on metabolic risk variables.

Using a randomized controlled pilot study of overweight and underactive adults with the metabolic syndrome, we discovered that teaching Restorative yoga to people with the metabolic syndrome is possible, with great adherence and retention.

142 underactive adults with the metabolic syndrome will participate in a rigorous randomized controlled trial coordinated by the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and conducted at two clinical sites, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), to determine whether Restorative yoga compared to a stretching control group will improve visceral adiposity, insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension.

Individuals will be assigned to one of two sites in two waves of 36 participants each, for a total of 48 weeks.

Upon completion of the 6-month evaluation, both groups will proceed to a 24-week maintenance phase before undergoing a 12-month end-of-trial evaluation.

Aim 2: To test the hypotheses that Restorative yoga reduces stress (the potential pathway that results in improved visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome) when compared to the stretching control group; and that Restorative yoga improves visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome when compared to the stretching control group.

3rd objective: To evaluate the hypotheses that decreased visceral adiposity improves inflammatory variables and an adipocytokine, a putative mechanism for the amelioration of the metabolic syndrome, in a randomized controlled trial.

Public Health Relevance

Individuals suffering from the metabolic syndrome are at an increased risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Adults with metabolic syndrome should participate in a randomized, controlled study of Restorative yoga, a calming kind of yoga, to see whether it might help them lower their metabolic risk factors. It is possible that yoga is connected with better metabolic risk variables. If this is true, yoga might be a cost-effective and safe alternative to diet and exercise in the treatment or prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

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