5 Ways to Relieve PMS Naturally

Ways to Relieve PMS Symptoms Naturally

As hormone levels fluctuate, Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a group of physical and emotional symptoms that some women experience in the days or weeks before their menstrual period. PMS symptoms include headaches, abdominal bloating, breast tenderness, changes in appetite, fatigue, depression, and anxiety in the days or weeks before their period. Images courtesy of Squaredpixels / Getty Images

Natural Remedies

If you suffer from premenstrual syndrome (PMS), you may be able to reduce your symptoms by altering your lifestyle. PMS symptoms can be alleviated in a variety of ways, many of which are natural. Strategies such as consuming or avoiding particular meals, as well as exercising, might be included in this category. Here are a few of the more regularly prescribed medications.

Calcium

Although a variety of supplements have been suggested to alleviate PMS symptoms, calcium is the only one that has been shown to be effective in clinical trials. According to one study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers reviewed data from 1057 females who had PMS and 1968 females who did not have PMS over a 10-year period. People who had a high dose of calcium from dietary sources had a considerably decreased chance of developing PMS, the researchers discovered. Low-fat dairy foods such as yogurt, fortified orange juice, and skim or low-fat milk (equal to about 1200 mg calcium) were shown to be related with a decreased risk of developing osteoporosis.

  • Dairy products, sesame seeds, almonds, and leafy green veggies are all good choices.

The researchers also discovered that participants who consumed a high amount of dietary vitamin D (a vitamin that affects calcium absorption and metabolism), equivalent to around 400 IU per day, had a decreased probability of experiencing PMS symptoms. A subsequent study published in BMC Women’s Health examined blood levels of vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) and discovered that low vitamin D levels were not associated with the risk of generalized premenstrual syndrome (PMS), but that low levels were associated with the risk of specific menstrual symptoms such as breast tenderness, diarrhea or constipation, fatigue, and depression during menstruation.

Diet

Sugar intake should be limited, and complex carbs should be included in your diet in sufficient amounts to help manage PMS, according to the most often recommended diet. It is possible that some people will benefit from lowering their salt consumption, which may assist to lessen bloating, water retention, and breast enlargement and soreness. As a result of the link between caffeine and premenstrual syndrome symptoms such as irritability and sleeplessness, some people may find it advantageous to limit their caffeine intake.

Exercise

Maintaining a regular exercise regimen may be beneficial in alleviating PMS symptoms. Endorphins, dopamine, and serotonin (chemical messengers that might improve mood) are released during regular aerobic exercise, which has good effects on energy and sleep.

Stress Management

Stress-relieving techniques such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, and yoga are all natural ways to relax and de-stress. During the weeks leading up to menstruation, many women report feeling more assertive and responsive to their own demands.

The ability to utilize this productively may be achieved through scheduling personal time for relaxation and expression of emotions, as well as prioritizing your needs and what nourishes you.

Agnus Castus (Chaste Tree Berry)

The berry of the chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus) is frequently recommended as a herbal remedy to aid with premenstrual syndrome. A research published in Phytomedicine looked at the usage of agnus castus (in three different dosages) and how it compared to a placebo in 162 women suffering from premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Participants who took 20 mg of the herb per day for three months showed significant improvement in their symptoms as compared to those who received a placebo or the 8 mg or 30 mg dosages of the plant throughout the same time period.

They discovered that agnus castus supplements were proven to be more beneficial than a placebo in five out of six experiments conducted.

Integrative Approaches

Acupuncture, massage therapy, and aromatherapy (using essential oils) are all methods that are occasionally recommended to help women with PMS symptoms. Although the benefits of these treatments have not been proven, some people find them to be useful, and if done appropriately, they are completely safe.

Bottom Line

If you suffer from premenstrual syndrome (PMS), there may be some lifestyle adjustments you may do to alleviate your symptoms. Knowing your pattern of symptoms is a critical first step in being able to manage them effectively. Starting with a little additional rest and self-care when you anticipate symptoms such as headaches, irritability, sadness or worry, you may work your way up to more severe measures over time. Consult with your health-care provider, who can assist you in determining the method that is most appropriate for you.

Thank you for taking the time to join up.

Please try your search again.

Read about oureditorial process to discover more about how we fact-check our information and ensure that it is accurate, dependable, and trustworthy.

  1. Calcium and vitamin D intake and the risk of incident premenstrual syndrome, Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 13
  2. 165(11):1246-52. Bertone-Johnson ER, Hankinson SE, Bendich A, Johnson SR, Willett WC, Manson JE. Calcium and vitamin D intake and the risk of incident premenstrual syndrome, Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 13.165(11):1246-52. doi:10.1001/archinte.165.11.1246
  3. A prospective cohort study of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of premenstrual syndrome was conducted by Bertone-Johnson ER, Hankinson SE, Forger NG, and colleagues.BMC Womens Health. 2014
  4. 14:56. doi:10.1186/1472-6874-14-56
  5. Cleveland Clinic.11 dietary modifications that might help you with PMS
  6. Heijnen S, Hommel B, Kibele A, Colzato LS.Neuromodulation of aerobic exercise: a review.Front Psychol. 2010
  7. 10:1–17. 2016
  8. 6:1890. Published on the 7th of January, 2016. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01890
  9. Patients suffering from premenstrual syndrome showed dose-dependent effectiveness of the vitex agnus castus extract ze440 in a study published in the journal Reproductive Endocrinology. Schellenberg R, Zimmermann C, and Drewe J. A comprehensive analysis of clinical studies using Vitex agnus-castus extracts for the treatment of female reproductive problems was published in Planta Med in 2013
  10. 79(7):562-75. Van die MD, Burger HG, Teede HJ, Bone KM. doi:10.1055/s-0032-1327831

supplementary readings

  • ER Bertone-Johnson, SE Hankinson, NG Forger, and colleagues A prospective cohort research examined the relationship between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of premenstrual syndrome. The BMC Women’s Health journal published a study by van Die MD, Burger HG, Teede HJ, and Bone KM. A comprehensive analysis of clinical studies using Vitex agnus-castus extracts for the treatment of female reproductive problems. Planta Med
  • Medicamentum

Top 5 Natural Ways to Relieve Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Every month, women go through a variety of physical and mental changes before their periods arrive. Premenstrual syndrome is the primary cause of these symptoms. It affects more than 90 percent of menstrual women, making it a common health problem in this population.

What is Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)?

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a collection of physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms that occur in tandem with the monthly period before the period begins. These symptoms usually appear a few days before the period and disappear after the menstrual cycle has begun.

Whatare PMS Symptoms?

Typically, a menstrual cycle lasts 28 days on average. PMS symptoms begin to manifest themselves around 10 to 14 days before menstruation. It occurs during the post-ovulation phase of the menstrual cycle, during which the hormone levels fluctuate the most and fall to their lowest levels. The signs and symptoms differ from woman to woman. Despite the fact that PMS has a vast list of symptoms, not every one of them manifests itself.

You may just have a couple of them occur to you. Additionally, physical and emotional-behavioral changes might occur as a result of the condition. PMS manifests itself in the form of physical symptoms such as:

  • Muscle aches and pains, fatigue, abdominal bloating, headache, and tenderness in your breasts are all symptoms of menopause. Acne flare-ups are becoming more frequent. Constipation is characterized by a change in bowel motions. ordiarrhea

PMS is characterized by emotional and behavioral symptoms, which include:

  • A sensation of increased anxiety
  • Crying episodes
  • Mood swings and emotional outbursts
  • Increased irritability
  • A feeling of depressed emotions
  • Food cravings Having difficulty falling asleep
  • Reduced focus
  • Alteration in sexual desires
  • Disengagement from social situations

How is PMS diagnosed?

Your doctor will need to know your medical history in order to diagnose you with PMS. PMS symptoms can be mistaken for thyroid diseases, mood and depression disorders, and chronic fatigue syndrome, among other conditions. A special test may be prescribed by your doctor to rule out any of these illnesses.

What are 5 Natural Ways to Relieve PMS Symptoms?

Most of the time, lifestyle adjustments and natural therapies can help you manage your PMS symptoms, which include discomfort, cramps, and mood swings, among other things. Here are a few natural remedies that you may use to alleviate PMS symptoms:

  1. Switch to a healthier diet: Adopting a more nutritious eating plan can assist to alleviate the symptoms of PMS. Make a point of having green leafy vegetables, which are high in iron and vitamin B, in your diet. Additionally, consume a variety of fruits to alleviate weariness and sleep issues. Reduce your intake of sugary meals and instead increase your intake of complex carbs. Because they are high in fiber, vegetables such as pumpkin, potatoes, lentils, and sweet potatoes are excellent choices. You may also choose healthy snacking alternatives, such as salads and almonds, to help you overcome your hunger pangs. Reduce your salt intake since it can cause water retention in the body, resulting in stomach bloating. Increase your daily water consumption. It has been shown that drinking water can assist to alleviate bloating and muscular cramps in certain people. Lemon, orange, and cucumber slices can be be used to flavor your water, as can mint leaves. It is possible to control mood swings, irritation, anxiety, and sleep issues if you reduce your caffeine intake during the premenstrual period. Exercise on a regular basis: Contrary to popular opinion, exercising before and during your period might be quite advantageous for your overall health. Regular aerobic workouts, such as brisk walking, running, swimming, or cycling, should be done to maintain a healthy weight. Exercise causes the release of endorphins, dopamine, and serotonin, which are feel-good hormones. These compounds have a calming effect on your mood and sleep patterns. Furthermore, exercise can help to stretch the muscles, enabling them to relax and reduce cramping while doing the activity. Experts agree that moderate-intensity activities are more advantageous than severe activity when compared to the latter. Yoga is one of the most effective types of exercise for reducing the symptoms of PMS. A favored kind of exercise for treating PMS symptoms due to the gentle motions and postures used in conjunction with the low impact nature of this form of exercise
  2. Manage your stress by doing the following: Stress reduction and relaxation can both assist to address the emotional imbalance that is related with premenstrual symptoms and to alleviate them. Natural relaxation techniques include deep breathing exercises, frequent meditation, and yoga practices, to name a few. You can prioritize your demands and communicate your feelings more effectively if you schedule some personal time. It will save you from having emotional outbursts and will give you greater control over your emotions. Take vitamins to help you: Preventing PMS symptoms and promoting a healthy menstrual cycle may be accomplished by supplementing your diet with vital vitamins and minerals. Muscle cramps can be alleviated by taking calcium and magnesium supplements. These vitamins are also useful in lowering bloating, exhaustion, and mood changes, among other symptoms. Magnesium supplements have been shown to lessen breast discomfort and alleviate sleep issues. Some women feel that taking vitamin B supplements might help them cope with the psychological symptoms of PMS, such as mood swings, anger, and anxiety
  3. Others disagree. Herbal therapies for PMS symptoms include the following: The use of herbal treatments that have anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic qualities can be effective in the management of PMS symptoms. Curcumin (an active ingredient in turmeric) has been shown to alleviate PMS symptoms. It possesses anti-inflammatory characteristics, which can aid in the management of pain and the improvement of your overall healing ability. It is possible to enhance your curcumin intake by taking curcumin capsules or by mixing turmeric powder with your meals.

When Should You Consult a Doctor?

Pain and emotional instability are frequent PMS symptoms, however the severity of these symptoms varies from woman to woman. The majority of the symptoms do not interfere with your daily activities. However, only a tiny fraction of women experience debilitating symptoms. A medical opinion can be obtained in the event that you are having difficulty controlling your symptoms and if the symptoms are interfering with your everyday activities. Make an appointment at Apollo HospitalsBy calling 1860-500-1066, you may schedule an appointment.

See also:  10 Things Only Pittas Will Understand

What does PMS Treatment Include?

The majority of women who suffer from PMS find relief by altering their lifestyle. It is possible that your doctor will give you particular medications to alleviate PMS symptoms if the symptoms are severe and interfering with your everyday activities. The following medications are used in the treatment of PMS:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, can be used to alleviate breast tenderness, cramping, and other symptoms of menstrual cramping. If you are considering using NSAIDs, see your doctor first. Long-term usage of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might result in stomach ulcers or bleeding. It is possible to take them before or during the onset of your period in order to alleviate the symptoms.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, can be used to alleviate breast tenderness, cramping, and other symptoms of menstrual cramps. Before using NSAIDs, see your doctor. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for an extended period of time may result in stomach ulcers and bleeding. It is possible to take them before or at the beginning of your period in order to alleviate the symptoms.

PMS symptoms repeat on a regular basis. Most of the time, these symptoms vanish as the period begins. You may lessen the severity of PMS symptoms by maintaining a healthy lifestyle and seeking medical care.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

PMS can begin somewhere between 10 and 14 days before your period begins and can last anywhere between 5 and 7 days following the first day of your cycle. You can lessen the severity of your symptoms by adopting a few lifestyle adjustments and home remedies into your routine. You might also attempt medical treatment to see if it helps to alleviate your problems. PMS symptoms can manifest themselves at any age (during the menstrual age between puberty and menopause). It is more prevalent throughout the decades of the 1920s and 1930s.

However, the exact reason of the deterioration is still unknown.

The content is validated by our expert Gynecologists, who additionally check the content on a regular basis to assist guarantee that the information you receive is accurate, evidence-based, and dependable for your health.

PMDD Natural Treatment: 10 Options

What is the procedure? Mood swings associated with the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) are known as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). It affects between 2% and 5% of premenopausal women, depending on the study. Despite the fact that it has many of the same symptoms as PMS — such as food cravings, irritability, and weariness — the symptoms are far more severe. Many women suffering with PMDD experience symptoms that are so severe that it is difficult to function. If medicine isn’t working or isn’t an option for you, you may find the natural therapies listed below to be useful.

Continue reading to find out more. Aromatherapy is the practice of inhaling essential oils in order to enhance one’s physical and emotional wellbeing. It is used to ease tension, promote sleep, and alleviate pain in patients. The following are some of the finest essential oils for PMDD symptoms:

  • What exactly is the procedure for doing this? Mood swings associated with the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) are referred to as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). In premenopausal women, it affects between 2% and 5% of them. It has many of the same symptoms as premenstrual syndrome (PMS), including food cravings, irritability, and exhaustion, but the severity of the symptoms is significantly higher. It is difficult to function for many women who suffer with PMDD since their symptoms are so severe. It’s possible that the natural cures listed below will be helpful if medicine isn’t working or isn’t an option for you. In order to improve general well-being, stress release and relaxation are encouraged, and symptoms are managed. For additional information, continue reading. It is possible to improve your physical and emotional health via the use of aromatherapy. Pain relief, stress reduction, and sleep improvement are all achieved by the usage of this supplement. The following are some of the finest essential oils for PMDD:

A few drops of essential oils can be added to a warm bath, or you can inhale the aroma directly by dabbing it on a cotton ball and inhaling it deeply. To use on your skin, mix 15 drops of essential oil with 1 ounce of carrier oil before massaging it in. Carrier oils that are popular include sweet almond, jojoba, and coconut. Massage the oil into your skin once it has been diluted. Essential oils that have not been diluted may irritate your skin. Even with dilution, it’s essential to conduct a patch test before applying the product.

  1. Infuse a few drops of diluted essential oil into the inside of your wrist or elbow
  2. Leave it on for a total of 24 hours. You should avoid rubbing lotion or applying any other substance to the affected region. If there is no irritation, it should be fine to use it in another location.

To use essential oils, apply them to your wrist or inner elbow once they’ve been diluted. For a full 24 hours, leave it on. It is not recommended that you apply lotion or apply any other substance to the region in question. If there is no irritation, it should be okay to use it in other places.

  • Consider scheduling your appointment during a time when you will not be interrupted, such as after the children have gone to bed
  • Before you get into the tub, light a candle that has a lavender or rose fragrance. Play calming background music, such as quiet jazz or classical piano, to help you relax. Bathe in a bathwater infused with aromatic oils. Because the oil will be dilute by the water, there will be no chance of irritation.

Slipping into a comfortable robe and slippers after your bath can help you maintain your state of relaxation even longer. Prepare a hot water bottle and lay it on your stomach or lower back to provide further pain relief and relaxation. Although menstruation products are a necessary evil during your period, they may exacerbate the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoria (PMDD). Some people experience increased cramping while using tampons, for example. It is possible that some of the components in pads can irritate your sensitive skin.

  • Consider using all-organic pads or organic period panties instead of conventional ones.
  • These reusable bell-shaped cups are worn inside to collect menstrual flow and may be washed after each usage.
  • Although it is uncertain if nutrition has an influence on PMDD, following a balanced diet may assist to reduce unpleasant sensations that make you feel worse.
  • Foods heavy in sugar may induce significant variations in blood sugar levels, which may exacerbate tiredness and mood swings in certain people.
  • Getting the necessary dietary elements has been demonstrated to be beneficial in the treatment of PMS.
  • If you aren’t getting enough nutrients from your diet, you can take supplements.
  • According to the Mayo Clinic, the following supplements may be worth experimenting with:
  • Calcium. Calcium in the form of 1,200 milligrams (mg) per day can help alleviate physical and mental problems
  • Magnesium in the form of 360 mg per day can help alleviate breast discomfort and bloating
  • Prostaglandins are produced by the body and can be reduced by taking 400 international units (IU) of vitamin E per day. Prostaglandins are known to induce pain
  • Taking 50 to 100 mg of vitamin B-6 daily can help alleviate exhaustion, irritability, and sleeplessness
  • And taking a multivitamin can help prevent migraines.

Calcium. 1,000 milligrams (mg) of calcium per day can help alleviate physical and emotional symptoms; magnesium (360 mg) can help alleviate breast discomfort and bloating; and vitamin D can help relieve physical and emotional symptoms. Prostaglandins are produced by the body and can be reduced by taking 400 international units (IU) of vitamin E each day for a month.

Prostaglandins are known to induce discomfort; taking 50 to 100 mg of vitamin B-6 daily can help alleviate exhaustion, irritability, and sleeplessness; and taking a multivitamin can help prevent heart disease.

Exercise in general is beneficial to your health. The more you exercise and stretch, the better your health will be. Other exercises to consider are as follows: If feasible, conduct your workout outside to take advantage of the fresh air and to benefit from the potent mood-boosting effects of vitamin D. Acupuncture is a technique in which small needles are put into precise places on your skin in order to ease pain and tension. According to a comprehensive evaluation published in 2011, acupuncture has the potential to be effective in the treatment of PMS symptoms.

The following acupuncture sites are the most effective for menstruation symptoms:

  • A couple of finger-widths below the naval to alleviate cramps and bloating, a bony area between the hips and buttocks to alleviate pelvic and back discomfort, a fleshy area between the thumb and forefinger to alleviate headaches and stomach pain, and so on.

Without sleep, it’s difficult enough for individuals to operate normally when they’re in good health. You will find it very hard to get through the day if you suffer from PMDD and don’t get enough sleep. Chronic sleeplessness has been linked to sadness and anxiety in certain people. It also has the additional effect of increasing irritation and weariness. Doctors and psychologists have argued over the years over whether or not PMDD is a legitimate condition. In the last several years, there has been a substantial improvement in our knowledge of this illness.

Despite the fact that most premenopausal women have some degree of PMS, it is uncommon to have symptoms that are so severe that they interfere with your daily activities.

It’s possible that you have PMDD.

6 tips for PMS relief

When it comes to premenstrual syndrome, there is a plethora of contradicting scientific evidence available (PMS). While it is true that the majority of women have some premenstrual symptoms, this does not imply that all women who menstruate suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome (1). For some, the entire issue of PMS has been overhyped and overblown for commercial gain. The most effective method of dealing with PMS is to identify your own patterns and determine which treatments are most effective in alleviating your symptoms.

You don’t always need scientific data to know what makes you feel better, whether it’s a hot bath or your favorite comfort food.

1. Eat a well-balanced diet to curb PMS symptoms

Make certain that you’re fueling your body and that you’re consuming a diet that has the nutrients it requires to grow. According to some study, eating a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D may help to minimize the likelihood of developing PMS (2).

Increased intake of thiamine (vitamin B1) and riboflavin (vitamin B2) in the diet may also lower the likelihood of suffering PMS (3). Not sure if you’re receiving all of the nutrients you should be getting? Keep track of your food intake for a few days to gain a better idea of your total intake.

2. Work out regularly to prevent PMS symptoms

In order for your body to thrive, you must nourish it and consume a diet that contains all of the nutrients it requires. According to some study, eating a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D may help to lessen the likelihood of developing PMS symptoms (2). Increased intake of thiamine (vitamin B1) and riboflavin (vitamin B2) in the diet may help lower the likelihood of having premenstrual syndrome (3). Having trouble determining whether or not you’re getting the nutrients you require. Food tracking for a few days will give you an overall view of your eating habits.

3. Reduce stress to fight PMS symptoms

An exacerbating cycle of stress and premenstrual syndrome may result from the combination of the two factors. If you experience mild to moderate anxiety or annoyance as part of your PMS pattern, consider yoga(5), breathing techniques (6), or mindfulness-based stress reduction to settle your nerves (7). Some forms of therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, may be effective in alleviating premenstrual symptoms; however, additional study is required (8).

4. Magnesium supplements for PMS symptoms

Magnesium shortage can manifest itself in a variety of ways, including anxiety, melancholy, irritability, and muscular weakness, among others (9). Magnesium supplements have been recommended to help reduce PMS-related symptoms such as headaches, bloating, and irritability, according to research (10). It is possible that taking a magnesium supplement in conjunction with vitamin B6 will be even more effective than taking magnesium alone (10).

5. Don’t blame every bad mood on PMS

We are not programmed machines. It is a normal element of being human to experience a wide range of emotions. Be sure to take into account other significant determinants of daily mood, such as general health and well-being, before making a link between PMS and mood fluctuations (11). In light of the fact that PMS is frequently used to discredit women in business and government, it is critical to explore what it truly is and how we talk about it. By referring to PMS as “witch syndrome,” we are merely contributing to the spread of damaging stereotypes.

See also:  Do a Digestion Assessment

6. Could PMS really be a magnification of an existing health or mental health condition?

For-profit companies that profit from premenstrual syndrome spend a significant amount of money on smart advertising that may encourage consumers to assume certain symptoms might be attributable to the condition. It’s critical to understand that some preexisting problems might become more severe during the premenstrual phase (12). It is possible that blaming PMS for any unpleasant symptoms that arise during the premenstrual phase is an indication of an underlying health problem. Anxiety and sadness are frequently misinterpreted as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) (12).

Tracking your PMS symptoms

Monitoring your symptoms might assist you in determining what your normal premenstrual experience would be like. Keep track of your PMS symptoms, triggers, and relief methods with Clue for at least three cycles, and you may begin to notice trends in your symptoms, triggers, and relief measures. The PMS symptom treatment options we’ve discussed are most effective for mild to moderate symptoms of the condition.

If your symptoms are moderate to severe, it may be time to consult with your healthcare practitioner about investigating some potential causes of your symptoms as well as exploring some other choices for symptom alleviation. The information in this article was last updated on June 3, 2020.

5 Ways to Relieve PMS Naturally

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. According to a study of 39 trials, Chinese herbs may be more effective in treating the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) than over-the-counter pain medications. Xiao shao san (Rambling Powder) is recommended by Jamie Koonce, who practices traditional Chinese medicine in Hot Springs, Arkansas. It contains herbs that are beneficial for balancing hormones, boosting circulation, alleviating cramps and decreasing inflammation.

Take it every day for the rest of the month if the condition is severe.

Saffron

According to the results of a research investigation, women who took 30 mg in capsule form every day for two cycles had a substantial reduction in overall PMS symptoms within a month of starting the treatment.

Calcium, magnesium, and B6

According to Roberta Lee, vice chair of the Department of Integrative Medicine Beth Israel’s Continuum Center for Health and Healing at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York, the calming effect of these supplements can help to alleviate PMS-related anxiety and restore balance to the nervous system during menstruation. The following supplements should be taken one week before your period begins: 500 to 1,000 mg of calcium daily, 400 to 500 mg of magnesium at night, and 25 to 40 mg of vitamin B6 daily.

Chasteberry (Vitex agnus-castus)

According to Roberta Lee, vice chair of the Department of Integrative Medicine Beth Israel’s Continuum Center for Health and Healing at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York, the relaxing impact of these vitamins can help reduce PMS-related anxiety and restore balance to the neurological system. The following supplements should be taken one week before your period begins: 500 to 1,000 mg of calcium daily, 400 to 500 mg of magnesium at night, and 25 to 40 mg of B6 daily.

Yoga Journal Newsletter

Increase the effectiveness of your practice, improve your understanding, and keep on top of the newest news.

5 Steps For Relieving Your PMS Symptoms

Written by a user on March 10, 20217057 Many women experience bodily pains, cramps, mood fluctuations, and even constipation and diarrhea in the days leading up to the start of their monthly period. Premenstrual symptoms are experienced by a small percentage of women who are severe enough to interfere with everyday activities. “True premenstrual syndrome, also known as PMS, describes emotional and physical changes that occur in a woman’s body in the days leading up to her period and interfere with her ability to perform daily activities,” explains Page Animadu, M.D., an obstetrician/gynecologist at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit.

Premenstrual Syndrome Explained

The post was made on March 10, 210757. Many women experience bodily pains, cramps, mood fluctuations, and even constipation and diarrhea in the days leading up to the start of their period. Premenstrual symptoms can be so strong in some women that they cause them to miss work or interfere with their regular activities. True premenstrual syndrome, also known as premenstrual syndrome, is characterized by emotional and physical changes in the days leading up to a woman’s period that interfere with her ability to perform daily activities, according to Page Animadu, M.D., an obstetrician/gynecologist at Henry Ford Health System in Dearborn, Michigan.

Therefore, while many women experience premenstrual symptoms, only around 3 to 8 percent of women have symptoms that are severe enough to prevent them from carrying out their normal daily activities.

  • Days 1–5 of the menstrual cycle
  • Days 6–13 of the follicular cycle
  • Days 14–16 of ovulation
  • Days 16–28 of the luteal phase

Ovulation occurs between days 14 and 16 of the menstrual cycle, while the luteal phase occurs between days 16 and 28 of the cycle.

  • Days 1–5 of the menstrual cycle
  • Days 6–13 of the follicular cycle
  • Days 14–16 of ovulation
  • And days 16–28 of the luteal phase.

How To Manage PMS

Whether you’re trying to conceive or not, your body goes through the same cycle every month in order to prepare itself to sustain a child. In order to produce the finest egg possible, release it, and create an environment suited for a baby, a rush of hormones such as estrogen and progesterone is required, followed by a rapid decrease. This decrease in synthesis of feel-good chemicals, such as serotonin, might result as a result of the decline in blood sugar levels. As Dr. Animadu points out, “women need to be reassured that nothing is wrong with them; they are simply experiencing a physiological response to a decline in hormones that produce joy and happiness.” In order to adjust for fluctuating hormone levels, you might perform a number of different things.

  1. It doesn’t matter whether you’re trying to conceive or not
  2. Your body goes through the same cycle every month to prepare itself to sustain a pregnancy. In order to produce the finest egg possible, release it, and create an environment suited for a baby, a spike of hormones such as estrogen and progesterone is required, followed by a rapid decrease in hormone levels. This decrease in synthesis of feel-good chemicals, such as serotonin, might result as a result of the decline in testosterone levels. As Dr. Animadu points out, “women need to be reassured that nothing is wrong with them
  3. They are simply experiencing a physiological response to a decrease in hormones that promote joy and happiness.” There are a number of things you may take to assist adjust for fluctuations in hormonal levels.

PMS Treatment Options

If you’re still experiencing severe PMS symptoms after using the techniques outlined above, see your healthcare professional. While making lifestyle changes is the first line of defense against PMS, there are a variety of prescription and over-the-counter medications that may be used to alleviate the symptoms. Doctor Animadu believes that using combined oral contraception (birth control), which includes estrogen and progestin, can help ease PMS symptoms. In the event that you do not detect a difference after three cycles, your doctor may prescribe antidepressants, which may be taken continuously or solely during the luteal phase.

  • PMDD (premenstrual dysphoric disorder) can cause severe changes in mood in the days leading up to your menstruation.
  • Do you want to hear more from our wellness experts?
  • To locate a doctor or certified nurse midwife at Henry Ford, go to henryford.com or contact 1-800-HENRYFORD (option 1).
  • In addition to seeing patients at Henry Ford Medical Center-Detroit Northwest, Dr.

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) – Diagnosis and treatment

Premenstrual syndrome cannot be diagnosed definitively based on any specific medical signs or laboratory testing. If a certain symptom is associated with PMS and occurs within your typical premenstrual cycle, your doctor may diagnose you with PMS. Premenstrual symptoms and indicators should be recorded on a calendar or in a journal for at least two menstrual cycles, according to your doctor, in order to help develop a premenstrual pattern. Make a note of the date on which you first notice PMS symptoms as well as the day on which they subside.

Certain diseases, such as chronic fatigue syndrome, thyroid abnormalities, and mood disorders, such as sadness and anxiety, might have symptoms that are similar to PMS.

Tests, such as a thyroid function test or a mood screening test, may be ordered by your health care provider to aid in the determination of a definitive diagnosis.

Treatment

Many women find that changing their way of life can help alleviate PMS symptoms. A drug for premenstrual syndrome may be prescribed by your doctor, however the number of pills prescribed will depend on the severity of your symptoms. The effectiveness of drugs in alleviating symptoms varies from woman to woman. Premenstrual syndrome drugs are commonly administered for a variety of reasons, including:

  • Antidepressants. It has been proven that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva), sertraline (Zoloft), and other medications are effective in alleviating symptoms of depression and anxiety. For severe PMS or PMDD, SSRIs are the first-line therapeutic option. These drugs are usually used on a daily basis. However, for certain women suffering from premenstrual syndrome (PMS), antidepressants should be restricted to the two weeks before menstruation begins. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) (NSAIDs). NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, and others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve) help relieve cramping and breast soreness if taken before or at the start of your period. Diuretics. Take water tablets (diuretics) to assist your body shed extra fluid through your kidneys if exercise and a low-salt diet aren’t enough to minimize the weight gain, edema, and bloating associated with PMS. Hormonal contraceptives, such as spironolactone (Aldactone), are diuretics that can help alleviate some of the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. This class of prescription drugs works by inhibiting ovulation, which may provide relief from PMS symptoms.

Lifestyle and home remedies

It is possible to control or lessen the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome by making adjustments to your eating and exercise habits, as well as the way you approach your everyday life. Try some of these suggestions:

Modify your diet

  • Reduce bloating and the sense of being full by eating smaller, more frequent meals. Reduce your intake of salt and salty meals to help prevent bloating and fluid retention. Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are examples of foods that are high in complex carbs. Calcium-rich foods should be consumed. If you are unable to handle dairy products or are not consuming enough calcium in your diet, taking a daily calcium supplement may be beneficial. Stay away from caffeinated beverages and alcoholic beverages.

Incorporate exercise into your regular routine

Exercise at least 30 minutes every day, five days a week, by vigorous walking, cycling, swimming, or engaging in another aerobic exercise. Physical activity on a regular basis can help you maintain or enhance your overall health while alleviating some symptoms such as weariness and a gloomy mood.

Reduce stress

  • Make sure you get enough sleep. Progressive muscle relaxation or deep breathing techniques can be used to relieve headaches, anxiety, and difficulty sleeping (insomnia). Relax and alleviate tension by doing yoga or getting a massage.

Record your symptoms for a few months

Keep a diary of your symptoms to help you determine the causes and timing of your problems. This will give you the opportunity to intervene with measures that may assist to minimize their severity.

Alternative medicine

Consider what we now know about the efficacy of complementary treatments for relieving the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

  • Consider what we now know about the efficacy of alternative therapies for relieving the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

Preparing for your appointment

In terms of the efficacy of complementary treatments for premenstrual syndrome, the following is what we know so far:

What you can do

  • Be aware of any restrictions that may apply prior to your visit. As soon as you schedule the appointment, inquire as to whether there is anything you need to do in advance to prepare
  • Make a list of any symptoms you’re feeling, even if they appear unrelated to the cause for which you’ve made the visit. List your important medical information, including any additional ailments for which you are being treated, as well as the names of any drugs, vitamins, or supplements you are now taking
  • Prepare a list of questions to ask your doctor and have it handy for reference. Notepaper and a pen should be brought with you so that you may write down information as your doctor answers your questions.
See also:  Health Help On-Line: Is It Reliable?

Some fundamental questions to ask your doctor about premenstrual syndrome include the following:

  • Could the symptoms I’m having be indicative of a more serious medical condition? Is there anything I can do to lessen PMSsymptoms? Will my PMSsymptoms ultimately go away on their own? Do you have any recommendations for PMS symptoms treatment? What options are available for therapy
  • Does the medication you’re providing have a generic equivalent
  • Do you have any brochures or other written materials that I may take with me? What websites do you think are worth seeing

Could the symptoms I’m having be indicative of a more serious medical condition? Is there anything I can do to lessen PMSsymptoms? Will myPMSsymptoms ultimately go away on their own? Do you have any recommendations for PMS treatment? What options are available for therapy; and In addition, do you have any brochures or other written materials that I may take with me if there is a generic alternative to the medication you’re prescribing? Do you have any recommended websites?

What to expect from your doctor

It is possible that your doctor may ask you a variety of questions, such as the following:

  • What is the severity of your symptoms
  • What days of your menstrual cycle are the most difficult for you to deal with your symptoms
  • Do you have days when you are not experiencing any symptoms throughout your menstrual cycle? Are you able to predict when your symptoms will manifest themselves? What seems to make your problems better or worse depends on your own experience. Are your symptoms interfering with your normal everyday activities? Have you ever felt sad, depressed, or hopeless? If so, you’re not alone. Is it possible that you or a member of your family has been diagnosed with a mental illness? What therapies have you tried thus far? What results have you had? What has been their effectiveness?

The 7th of February, 2020

5 ways to ease PMS naturally

PMS affects as many as three out of every four women, accounting for a significant proportion of the menstrual population. This umbrella term, often known as PMT, refers to the wide range of signs and symptoms that women experience as their period approaches. Some women suffer from PMS to a severe degree, while others suffer from it to a little degree. It’s crucial to remember that really severe PMS and painful, heavy periods can be a symptom of underlying disorders such as PCOS and endometriosis – so if you’re experiencing symptoms of PMS, don’t suffer in silence any longer.

Keep in mind that hormonal contraceptives are not the only option for dealing with unpleasant symptoms, and that full diagnostic techniques should be explored first to rule out any conditions that could be causing your symptoms to appear.

Women have long known that nature holds the key to easing and relaxing some of the most painful symptoms of PMS; yet, this information has gotten lost or hidden over time due to a lack of communication among women.

We have, fortunately, captured much of that wisdom and are now able to share it and assist one another holistically with this monthly component of our life, thanks to our collective experience.

Relaxation techniques

Because the letter ‘S’ in PMS stands for stress, it is critical to reduce anxiety and tension during this period. Women frequently describe feeling depressed, despondent, listless, and depleted of energy in the days leading up to their period. Techniques that promote relaxation can assist in regulating the ups and downs that occur as a result of variable hormone levels. Take a stroll in nature to help you center and clear your thoughts. Yoga, breathing exercises, meditation, and journaling are all good ways to start.

Don’t be scared to weep or be furious; instead, allow yourself to experience and express those feelings without holding them in.

Hydration

Of course, being hydrated at all times and during your cycle is critical – but immediately before your period, water retention can cause you to feel bloated as your body tries to retain as much fluid as possible. Despite the fact that it may seem paradoxical, drinking enough of filtered water can aid in flushing out any extra fluids and keeping you clear-headed, focused, and invigorated throughout this part of your cycling journey.

Nourish

What we eat is extremely essential for our hormonal balance and overall health – but it’s especially crucial to consume enough of nutrient-dense foods before and throughout our cycle, such as leafy greens and legumes (even if you just feel like reaching for the chocolate). If your sweet desires are becoming overwhelming, try something earthy, grounded, and nutritious instead, such as hot chocolate sweetened with coconut sugar or energy balls prepared with nut butter and dates.

Supplements

When it comes to hormonal balance and health, what we eat is really essential – but it’s especially crucial to consume enough of nutrient-dense foods before and throughout our cycle, such as leafy green vegetables and legumes (even if you just feel like reaching for the chocolate). If your sweet desires are overwhelming you, try something earthy, grounded, and nutritious instead, such as hot chocolate sweetened with coconut sugar or energy balls prepared with nut butter and dried dates.

Keep moving

Although exercise may be the last thing on your mind when you’re feeling bloated and having cramps, a little modest movement may be quite beneficial in alleviating PMS-related symptoms. When it comes to exercise, it’s vital not to overdo it with extreme cardio or heavy weights; instead, use milder approaches such as yoga, tai chi, swimming, or taking a stroll in the fresh air. It is believed that moving your body in this manner helps to maintain high energy levels and stimulates the synthesis and release of endorphins, dopamine, and serotonin, which assist to regulate mood.

How to Beat PMS Naturally

When you’re fatigued, bloated, and your face is greasy, your stomach cramps, your head hammering, and your back aching, you’re unhappy for a while before becoming super-smiley, and all the chocolate and potato chips in the world can’t make you feel better. You’re practicing “PMSing.” The period before your period is that wonderful time when your hormones are absolutely out of whack and you feel like a whole different version of yourself. This is a version that you might not enjoy. PMS, also known as Premenstrual Syndrome, is a prevalent yet confounding condition: There are some ladies who don’t get it at all, while others get it in full force; it might last 2 days or it can last 10 days.

Below are some of the most effective natural therapies (as well as nutrition and lifestyle suggestions) that will help you alleviate your PMS symptoms—and maybe even remove them entirely. But, before we get to the good stuff, let’s go through the fundamentals of PMS.

What is Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)?

“Perpetual Munching Syndrome,” “Psychotic Mood Shift,” “Puffy Mid-Section,” and other such terms are used to refer to the symptoms of PMS, which normally manifest themselves the week before Aunt Flo’s visit and can include any number or combination of unpleasant symptoms (see above). An increase in estrogen and progesterone levels, which is common for a woman to experience immediately before her period, can be attributed to many of these inconveniences. The goal is to keep hormone levels at a somewhat low, healthy level throughout the month (goodbye, big decrease!) in order to prevent PMS symptoms.

My suggestions below are intended to assist you in striking the correct balance.

Top 5 Natural Remedies for Reducing PMS Symptoms

1. Make the most of your dietary fats by eating them in moderation. All dietary lipids have been shown to boost estrogen production (study). Furthermore, because we’re attempting to maintain levels lower throughout the month in order to prevent the PMS dip, it’s a good idea to keep daily total fat consumption under control. Additionally, make an effort to stress Omega-3 fats the most in your diet (sources: flax, chia, hemp and walnuts). The anti-inflammatory and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids have also been proven to alleviate many of the physical and psychological symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) when 2,000 mg of the fatty acids per day were ingested by participants (study).

  • 2.
  • When it comes to female hormones, fiber has the opposite effect of fat, helping to keep levels in a healthy, lower range throughout the month (study).
  • Every day, aim for at least 5 servings of vegetables, 3 servings of high-fiber, low-sugar fruits, and a cup of cooked beans or lentils, according to your dietary needs.
  • (See related article.) Win!3.

Because calcium and vitamin D levels in the blood have been demonstrated to be lower in women suffering from premenstrual syndrome (PMS), researchers evaluated these nutrients as potential PMS treatments in a subset of the Nurses’ Health Study II (a NIH-funded, Harvard-based research study of over 116,000 nurses, which investigated oral contraceptives, diet and lifestyle).

  1. Fortified non-dairy milks (e.g., hemp, flax, and nut milks), kale, chia seeds, collard greens, and tahini are some of the greatest plant-based calcium sources available.
  2. If your latitude does not enable you to obtain enough during the darker months of the year, you can supplement with vitamin D-fortified foods such as dried shiitake mushrooms, fortified plant milks, orange juice, and cereals.
  3. Unfortunately, I am unable to provide a solid response as to whether vitamin D2 or D3 derived from lichens is equally bioavailable to the body as vitamin D3 derived from animals.
  4. Fourth, raise the amount you consume of magnesium and vitamin B6.
  5. The majority of research employed supplements rather than meals, although magnesium-rich chow may easily fulfill the necessary 250 mg of magnesium per day, which can help reduce PMS symptoms.

Maintaining caution should be exercised because, while magnesium toxicity from foods is extremely rare (because the kidneys eliminate excess magnesium through the urine), magnesium supplements may cause toxicity symptoms such as nausea and abdominal cramping, as well as diarrhea and even more serious complications when taken in large quantities.

When it comes to vitamin B6, you’ll most likely need to supplement.

Moodiness, irritability, forgetfulness, bloating, and anxiety can be alleviated by taking vitamin B6 from food sources such as sweet potatoes and white potatoes (study).

Excessive dosages may result in ataxia, which is a sensory neuropathy characterized by the inability to regulate one’s own physical movements (source).

This is not good! In case you suspect that you could be approaching the top limit, you should consult with your doctor, toots, about getting your levels examined.

Want more tips to create ease in your life? Get actionable steps straight to your inbox:

5. Engage in physical activity and maintain a healthy weight. Aerobic activity not only aids in the release of mood-lifting endorphins, but it may also assist to alleviate some of the physical and emotional changes that occur during menstruation. A study of non-athlete women found that beginning a practice of three aerobic exercise sessions per week for 60 minutes each resulted in a substantial reduction in PMS symptoms (study). Decide on an activity that you enjoy doing for approximately an hour three times a week.

You’ll be in a much better mood when it’s time for your period.

I hope you’re feeling better now that you’ve armed yourself with a variety of PMS fighting equipment, strong one.

Additionally, check out this Crazy Sexy Juicerecipe for additional relief and vitality!

Bloat Buster

This recipe yields 2 servings.

  • 2 medium-sized cucumbers
  • 6 dandelion greens
  • 2 big Swiss chard leaves
  • 1/8 cup parsley, leaves and stems, carefully packed
  • Honeydew melon cubes (about 2 cups)

1. Clean and prepare all of the ingredients. 2. Blend all of the ingredients together. Please let me know if you are a victim of PMS in the comments section. What is it that helps you cope? Cycles of tranquility and smoothness Crazily Sexy Juice, my most recent book, is jam-packed with raw veggie juice, smoothie, and nut milk recipes that will help you incorporate even more raw veggie power into your everyday routine. You may purchase this book here.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *