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The Official Lindora Lean for Life app is the go-to app for anyone who prefers audio coaching over video coaching (which is especially beneficial if you’re a runner or biker). Depending on the activity (running, cycling, strength training, or flexibility), the venue (indoors or outdoors), the length, and the intensity of the workout, you may create a personalized program. While exercising, the app gives you with real-time statistics on the amount of time and calories you have burnt. For even greater accuracy, consider purchasing the compatiblePEAR Training Intelligence Kit, which includes a heart rate monitor and earphones that track real-time heart rate while syncing it with your (free) PEAR app, allowing your coaches to provide training cues that are tailored specifically to your level of intensity and training goals.

iOS devices are supported.

Imagine spending six months traveling across the United States in search of the country’s standout yoga teachers and fellow passionate yogis… Sound fun? Now, you can!

Imagine yourself taking yoga sessions with like-minded individuals, discussing over tea about how they practice yoga both on and off the mat, and then filming their experiences to share with the rest of the yoga community. However, despite the fact that it appears to be too good to be true, this is the position we’re trying to fill owing to our exciting new relationship with Gaia (formerly known as Gaiam TV), the world’s leading supplier of online yoga courses and conscious media. Currently, we are on the lookout for two brand ambassadors who will be able to bring this interactive mobile-media and community outreach program to life for our very first jointLIVE BE YOGATour.

If this job seems like it was built just for you, click here to submit your application.

Please follow us on Facebook at @[email protected], and send us your images when we are in your city using the hashtag #LIVEBEYOGA.

BONUS: To celebrate your yoga practice, the weekend, and ourLIVE BE YOGA tour, we’re giving away yoga and lifestyle gear from our sponsors on Fridays throughout the year!Enter here to win, and check back on Mondays for new prizes.

See also The Right Livelihood Is the Key to Loving Your Job (PDF).

How to Craft the Perfect Yoga Teacher Resume (And Land Your Dream Job)

You’ve recently completed your 200-hour yoga teacher training program and are now prepared to apply for your first job as a yoga instructor in your area. Before contacting any potential employers, you’ll want to do what any other job seeker would do: create a résumé that showcases your talents and helps you come across as knowledgeable—and, more crucially, as a qualified candidate. Don’t let the fact that you have limited teaching experience deter you from pursuing your goals. As a result of all you experienced as a student, you are now a better teacher than you realize.

Yoga instructor and teacher trainer Jenny Aurthur has worked in New York City for more than 20 years as a yoga instructor and teacher trainer.

Do you want to know more? Don’t forget to check out our in-depth guide for new instructors.

What to include in your yoga teacher resume

Top of your resume should include contact information such as your name, phone number, email address, and website (if you have one). Make it easy for potential employers to reach you by following the first guideline of resume writing: Do not make it difficult for them to contact you!

Mission statement or professional summary

This is the hook that will pique the interest of a potential employer and entice him or her to read the remainder of your resume. Writing abilities, credentials, and any relevant experience you may have that may be useful to a teaching post should be limited to four to five sentences (no more than 4–5). Take use of this opportunity to brag about your achievements while also providing an insight into your passion for yoga. The tone should be informal, but it should also be genuine.

Educationcertifications

Your resume’s “hook” is the first sentence that draws an employer’s attention and encourages them to read the remainder of your resume. Writing abilities, qualifications, and any relevant experience you may have that might be useful to a teaching post should be limited to a few phrases (no more than 4–5) Take use of this opportunity to brag about your achievements while also providing an insight into your passion for yoga. – A casual, yet genuine tone should be used.

Work history

Alternatively, if you have no prior yoga teaching experience, Aurthur recommends listing your present or most recent non-yoga work, but refrains from going any farther than that. “Do not include your five most recent positions on your resume,” she stresses. Create a bulleted list of the duties and obligations of the position, and don’t worry about using whole sentences; instead, make them brief and to the point. According to Aurthur, you should include anything you’ve ever done that is linked to teaching.

Skills

Alternatively, if you have no previous yoga teaching experience, Aurthur recommends listing your present or most recent non-yoga work, but refrains from going any farther than that. According to her, “you should not mention your five most recent positions.” Create a bulleted list of the duties and obligations of the position, and don’t worry about using whole sentences; instead, make them brief and to the point! If you’ve ever done anything linked to education, Aurthur recommends include it. The fact that you taught a writing course three years ago demonstrates that you have prior teaching and leadership expertise.

Volunteer experience (optional)

Volunteer experience, such as assisting at a local yoga festival or conference or teaching a kids yoga session without compensation, can demonstrate that you’ve at the very least gotten your feet wet in the yoga world.

References

If you had a favorable experience with your yoga teacher training teachers, inquire as to whether they would be willing to be included to your list of references. Any teachers you’ve studied under or practiced with for a substantial period of time are another option to consider.

Other resume tips

To read and download our yoga instructor resume template, please click on the image.

1. Keep it short

In most circumstances, your resume should not exceed one page. Due to the fact that you will not have much professional experience to draw from, this should not be too tough, but it may necessitate some ingenuity in your layout. Some layouts organize the overview and talents into a column on the left side of the page, while others just present them in a single list. Microsoft Word comes pre-loaded with a plethora of resume templates from which to choose.

2. Don’t forget about social media

Jennie Bell of Peace Through Strength Yoga Academy, where she works as a co-founder and teacher trainer, reminds her students that using social media to demonstrate your skills and worth to a prospective employer is a good idea. While having thousands of followers might demonstrate that you have already established a community, it is more important to create a platform where people can see your abilities and skill as a yoga instructor in general. Please submit the URL of your social media site, which has yoga material, together with your contact information.

3. Find a mentor

Take into consideration requesting someone to be your mentor because such relationship demonstrates a commitment to the learning process.

4. Start local

In the event that you are seeking for your first teaching position, the studio where you routinely practice may be your best chance. When it comes to practicing yoga, Jessy Nicholson, owner of the The Sankalpa Collective in Denver, Colorado, explains, “a key thing for me is that the individual be part of the community as a student so that people can observe your practice.” Building a following is much easier if you are a regular participant in a class and other students are already familiar with you.

Want to know more about making the transition from yoga student to yoga teacher?

Take a look at our guide: So, you’ve completed your yoga teacher training program.

Likewise, see: Here’s how much yoga instructors should charge for their classes.

5 Insider Tips for Building Your Dream Yoga Biz

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Teachers, protect yourself with liability insurance and access benefits to build your skills and business. As a TeachersPlus member, you receive low-cost coverage, a free online course, exclusive webinars and content packed with advice from master teachers, discounts on education and gear, and more.Join today!

My experience with yoga business began when I launchedCamp Yoga, an adult yoga-focused sleepover camp that combines all of the excitement of summer camp and yoga festivals without the high costs. I had no prior experience with any of these activities. Now, only two years later, I’m hosting camps in seven different sites around North America, with plans to expand to a total of 15 locations by 2020. Friends frequently inquire as to how I achieved my results. Here’s a little insider information to assist you in making your yoga business goals a reality as well.

1. Do what I call “reverse math.”

My experience with yoga entrepreneurship began when I launchedCamp Yoga, an adult yoga-focused overnight camp that combines all of the excitement of summer camp and yoga festivals, but without the high costs. Currently, less than two years later, I’m offering camps in seven places around North America, with a goal of expanding that number to fifteen sites by 2020.

How did I do it? This is something that many of my friends have asked me about. If you want to start your own yoga business, here’s some insider information to help you get started.

2. Know that you’re going to have to make some sacrifices.

When I started Camp Yoga, a yoga-focused sleepover camp for adults that combines all of the fun of summer camp and yoga festivals without the high cost, I was completely unfamiliar to the world of yoga business. Now, only two years later, I’m hosting camps in seven different sites across North America, with plans to expand to 15 locations by 2020. Friends frequently inquire as to how I accomplished this. Here’s a little insider information to assist you in realizing your yoga business goals as well.

3. Fight “imposter syndrome.”

Stop listening to those voices in your brain that tell you that you can’t do it, for the love of Meryl Streep. Because you are capable of doing so and will do so. When I established Camp Yoga, I had no idea that it would entail spending long, lonely evenings in a trailer, looking into the darkness, wondering what the hell I had just done, giving up my life in Canada to travel throughout the United States and expand the Camp Yoga organization. When you’re alone, worry and self-doubt may creep up on you like wildfire.

The most important thing you can do for your company is to remind yourself how fantastic you are.

That group of folks that always seem to have a question for you or who express themselves with a little more skepticism than optimism when they offer you support.

4. Don’t ask your friends for advice.

This may appear to be a severe measure, but bear with me. For starters, there’s a significant probability that your friends won’t be able to provide you with the answers you’re searching for. If they had, wouldn’t they have done exactly what you’re attempting to accomplish now? Consider the following, which is more significant: Trying to figure out if you’re asking your friends about your business because you need their help or because you just want to feel better about what you’re doing may be a difficult decision.

As a result, rather of relying on your buddies, consult with the professionals.

5. Hire a pro.

You’ve got the concept, the heart, and the enthusiasm. What could possibly be in your way? Oh, wait a minute. You have no prior sales or marketing experience.nor do you have any real estate or financial background. Well, here’s the good news: you don’t have to be very talented in these areas. Several options for expanding your business’s reach, bringing more customers in through the doors, and ensuring that the financial side of things is in excellent hands are available at reasonable costs.

Take a look at as well Overcoming Fear and Venturing Outside Your Comfort Zone: 4 Tips for Success Check out this article on why yoga teachers require liability insurance.

See also:  Why I Do Yoga: Hama

In Colorado, from February 24–26, you may participate in activities such as dogsledding, archery, wine tasting, moccasin-making, and a variety of yoga and fitness sessions offered by some of the region’s greatest teachers.

To learn more, visit wintercampcolorado.com. For further information, please see campyoga.ca.

Land your dream yoga job

It’s a good idea to leave a business card at each location where you establish contact. If the company does not presently have a position open, they may still utilize your contact information and reach out to you if and when they are in need of a replacement instructor. STEP 4: Accept a position or continue to network. You will become even more skilled at networking and selling yourself as a result of this approach. When it comes to the yoga business, this learning curve is highly beneficial.

  1. If you have not been able to find work, it is possible that the employment market in your area has become saturated.
  2. You gained valuable experience by putting yourself out there, and the next time you do it, it will be far less difficult.
  3. Yogatrade.com Yogatrade.com is the most often used resource.
  4. You may look for possibilities based on where you live.
  5. Even if the chances are no longer available, contacting them may open the door to a position on the replacement list or a lead to contacting another institution in the future.
  6. Options such as working for a local family who is searching for a private tutor in exchange for lodging and board may be available.
  7. Jobs advertised on this site are generally swaps rather than paid ones.

Additionally, you may check for yoga studios that provide classes online by searching on social media in the region where you are interested in working.

To demonstrate your reputation, it is also beneficial to have your own website.

Before going half-way across the world to work in another country, each of you should wish to establish credibility for the role and for each other before accepting the post.

This strategy is more difficult to utilize since it relies on a digital platform to facilitate communication.

Keep your emails concise and to the point.

It may be difficult for anybody to read a lengthy, descriptive email, and it is even more difficult when the email is written in a language that is not the reader’s native tongue.

Don’t let this opportunity pass you by.

Many other civilizations do not have individuals who are as enslaved to their inboxes and electronics as we are email the Western world.

Getting a yoga career before moving to a community is still doable, but there are several factors to keep in mind when you begin your quest for employment.

Allow these guidelines to act as a road map for you as you go on your soul-searching journey to reach your objectives. She is a yoga instructor, lifestyle blogger, wellness warrior, globetrotter, bohemian fashionista, and soul seeker who lives in Los Angeles (mindbodycolleen.com)

Starting your yoga teacher career

5 Pointers to Consider Before Beginning Your Yoga Teacher Career Yoga teacher training looks to be the ultimate life-hack, according to some. “Am I excellent enough to become one myself?” you might wonder. “Am I good enough to become one myself?” You are, without a doubt, correct! The practice of yoga is suitable for everyone, and as long as you are able to share your knowledge and enthusiasm for it with others, you are on the right course. By quitting your work to train as a yoga teacher, you may earn a living in a different way while assisting students in finding inner peace through movement, mindfulness and meditation.

  • Prepare for the worst.
  • Despite the fact that yoga and business are virtually diametrically opposed in nature, a new instructor will need to be somewhat entrepreneurial in order to get things started.
  • No of if it is ethical or not, the unpleasant fact is that a competent 200-hour yoga teacher training program may easily cost anywhere between $3,000 and $7,000.
  • It is necessary to include in the initial costs of pursuing a full-time yoga profession after you have paid for the necessary training and certification.
  • To put it another way, your new yoga life is a company that requires financial management and attention, especially in the early phases of development.
  • A typical schedule for a successful yoga instructor includes courses in the mornings and evenings, as well as seminars and intensives on the weekends, and includes classes in both English and Spanish.
  • Prepare to be on the road virtually continuously, juggling employment, meetings, and your own private practice, among other things.

Some people find it as simple as completing a teacher training program followed by securing an ideal teaching position at an exquisite yoga school.

However, this is not the case for the vast majority of newly trained instructors.

This will necessitate visits to studios, participation in seminars, and the sending of emails.

When it comes to establishing a successful yoga business, having the patience to create a dedicated audience is key.

As a result, in order to attract loyal pupils, you must distinguish yourself from the competition.

The most effective approach to prevent this from happening is to encourage new yogis to go onto their mats for the first time by providing them something different.

For example, if you are a runner, you might start a yoga for runners class, or if you used to work in the medical field, you could start a stress-relieving yoga session for nurses and physicians who are stressed out.

Make Your Intentions Clearly Visible Be sure to give considerable consideration to your reasons for making a job shift before taking the plunge.

If your urge to teach stems from a sense of self-importance, you may not be ready to do so.

In order to accomplish this effectively, your teaching must originate from a position of selflessness on your part.

Continue to put in the effort.

Now what?

Many instructors fall prey to the trap of being too comfortable in their teaching and finding themselves trapped in the same mind-numbing routine that originally prompted them to contemplate a change of professional path in the first place.

Make a point of continuing to attend yoga classes (including seminars and retreats), as well as developing your own practice and teaching style.

To be an excellent teacher, you must first feed your own inspiration so that you may successfully motivate and inspire others.

In order to fulfill the expectations of the job, teaching yoga is not a catalyst for spiritual awakening, nor is it a prerequisite of the position, and it is usual for teachers to fall short of these expectations.

A competent yoga instructor will assist students in shedding light on aspects of their lives that have previously been shrouded in darkness via the promotion and support of connection, kindness, and rehabilitation.

Aside from that, he is the creator of VIKASA Yoga Academy and a contributor to the website BookYogaRetreats.

Quitting Your Job to Become a Yoga Teacher

Prior to beginning your yoga teacher career, consider these five suggestions. A yoga teacher training program looks to be the ultimate life-hack, according to some. The question you could be asking yourself is, ‘Am I good enough to be a member of the clergy myself?” You are, without a doubt. The practice of yoga is suitable for everyone, and as long as you are able to pass on your knowledge and enthusiasm for the practice to others, you are on the correct path. Quitting your work to train as a yoga instructor offers an alternate means of earning a living while assisting students in finding inner peace through movement, mindfulness, and meditation.

  1. Plan Ahead of Time Make sure you understand the financial and social ramifications of establishing your own yoga company before you submit your resignation letter.
  2. Or, alternatively, you may have already completed your teacher training and are aware of the associated expenditures, or you may not have even begun your research yet.
  3. In addition, if you decide to take it abroad, you will incur additional expenditures due to the flight.
  4. In addition to business cards and yoga mats, you will need a room to teach in as well.
  5. A significant change in working hours can make the transition from a 9-5 job to a self-employed yoga teacher difficult for many people.
  6. In the middle of the day, planning, administration, and private clients are completed.
  7. Construct a network of contacts The path to becoming a yoga teacher is relatively straightforward for those who complete a teacher training program and then secure a dream job at a gorgeous studio.

When putting such a network of contacts, you must be prepared to put in a significant amount of time.

This is simply the beginning of the story.

Choose a specialized area of expertise.

Because of this, you must distinguish yourself from the competition in order to gain loyal pupils.

In order to prevent this from happening, it’s important to encourage new yogis to go onto their mats for the first time by giving something fresh.

Consider starting a yoga class just for runners, or starting a stress-relieving in-hospital class for stressed-out nurses and physicians if you used to work in the medical field.

As a result, you will be able to teach from your own experience while also successfully meeting the requirements of your pupils.

You should ask yourself if you are teaching mostly for yourself or primarily for the sake of your pupils.

Teaching yoga is about giving back to your students, about providing them with a platform for self-awareness and discovery via their practice.

Remember to be careful of your words, speak directly to the kids’ bodies frequently, and give them the impression that they are being supported throughout the exercise.

Now what?

Many instructors fall prey to the trap of being too comfortable in their teaching and finding themselves trapped in the same mind-numbing routine that initially prompted them to contemplate a change of vocation.

When it comes to instructors of all kinds, there is an old proverb that holds true: ‘you can’t pour out of an empty cup.’ To be an excellent teacher, you must first feed your own inspiration so that you may successfully motivate and inspire people around you.

Teaching yoga is neither a means of attaining enlightenment, nor is it a prerequisite of the job role, and it is common for instructors to fall short of this standard.

It is not their responsibility to master yoga or become enlightened.

a brief biography of the author Founder and originator of the VIKASA Yogamethod, which is a unique, difficult, and successful approach to yoga, is Kosta MiachinKosta. Aside from that, he is the creator of VIKASA Yoga Academy and a contributor to the website BookYogaRetreats.com

About to trade in your soul-crushing job for a glamorous life as a yoga instructor? Here’s the truth that nobody has the heart to tell you.

5 Points to Consider Before Beginning Your Yoga Teacher Career It appears that being a yoga instructor is the ultimate life-hack. ‘Am I good enough to be a doctor myself?’ you might wonder. You are, without a doubt, right! As long as you are able to share your knowledge and enthusiasm for the practice with others, you are on the correct course. By quitting your work to train as a yoga instructor, you may make a living while assisting students in finding inner peace through movement, mindfulness, and meditation.

  1. Take Precautions Make sure you understand the financial and social ramifications of establishing your own yoga business before you hand in your resignation.
  2. Perhaps you have already completed your teacher training and are aware of the associated fees, or perhaps you haven’t even begun your research yet.
  3. To say nothing of the additional expenditures associated with travel if you chose to take it overseas.
  4. You’ll need to set aside money for things like business cards, yoga mats, and a classroom space.
  5. Due to the difference in working hours between a 9-5 job and being a self-employed yoga instructor, many people find it difficult to make the transition.
  6. The center of the day is reserved for planning, administrative tasks, and private client meetings.
  7. Establish a network of people.

This is not the case, however, for the vast majority of newly trained instructors.

It will be necessary to visit studios, attend classes, and write emails in order to do this.

When it comes to building a successful yoga business, patience is required in order to create a devoted clientele.

As a result, in order to attract dedicated pupils, you must distinguish yourself from the competition.

See also:  Yoga and Divorce

The most effective approach to prevent this from happening is to encourage new yogis to come onto their mats for the first time by giving something fresh.

For example, if you are a runner, you might start a yoga for runners class, or if you used to work in the medical field, you could start a stress-relieving yoga session for nurses and physicians at hospitals.

Make Your Intentions Clearly Stated Before embarking on your job move, take the time to thoroughly analyze your motivations for doing so.

If your urge to teach stems from a sense of self-importance, you may not be ready.

In order to be effective, your teaching must originate from a position of selflessness.

Continue to Put Your Skills to the Test So you’ve obtained your TT certification, quit your job, and amassed a respectable clientele base.

Many teachers fall into the trap of being too comfortable in their teaching and finding themselves in the same mind-numbing routine that initially prompted them to contemplate a career change.

Continue to attend courses, workshops, and retreats, and focus on refining your own practice and teaching technique on a continual basis.

To properly teach, you must first feed your own inspiration so that you may then successfully inspire others.

Teaching yoga is neither a trigger for enlightenment, nor is it a necessity of the job role, and it is typical for teachers to fall short of this expectation.

A competent yoga instructor will assist students in shedding light on aspects of their lives that have previously been shrouded in darkness by encouraging and promoting connection, kindness, and rehabilitation.

Biographical information about the author: Founder and originator of the VIKASA Yogamethod, which is a unique, difficult, and successful approach to yoga. Aside from that, he is the creator of VIKASA Yoga Academy and a contributor to the website BookYogaRetreats.com.

1. Be Financially Prepared

5 Pointers to Keep in Mind Before Beginning Your Yoga Teacher Career Training to become a yoga instructor looks to be the ultimate life-hack. The question you could be asking yourself is, ‘Am I good enough to be a doctor myself?’ Of course you are! Yoga is for everyone, and as long as you are able to share your knowledge and enthusiasm for the practice with others, you are on the right way. Quitting your work to train as a yoga teacher offers an alternate option to make a career while assisting students in finding inner peace through movement, mindfulness, and meditation.

  • Prepare for the worst Before you put in your resignation, consider the financial and societal ramifications of establishing your own yoga business.
  • Perhaps you have already completed your teacher training and are aware of the associated fees, or perhaps you haven’t even begun your search for a training program yet.
  • Not to mention the additional expenditures of travel if you decide to take it overseas.
  • You will need to set aside money for things like business cards, yoga mats, and a venue to teach in.
  • Because of the time disparity between a 9-5 job and becoming a self-employed yoga instructor, many people find it difficult to make the transition.
  • The middle of the day is dedicated to planning, administration, and private clients.
  • Create a Network of People For a select few, breaking into the world of yoga teaching is as simple as completing a teacher training program and securing a dream job at a gorgeous studio.

If you want to do the latter, you must be prepared to put in a significant amount of time and effort to establish a network.

and that’s only the beginning.

Discover Your Specialization According to a research performed by Yoga Journal and the Yoga Alliance, the number of yoga instructors in the United States has more than quadrupled in the last six years.

In an ideal situation, you want to develop your own following without infringing on the rights of other teachers.

Look to your own life for inspiration.

As a result, you will be able to teach from your own experience while also efficiently meeting the requirements of your students.

Before you begin on your job move, you should carefully analyze your motivations for doing so.

If your urge to teach stems from a selfish motivation, it is possible that you are not ready.

In order to be effective, your teaching must originate from a position of selflessness.

Continue to Put Your Skills to Work So you’ve earned your TT certification, quit your job, and amassed a respectable clientele base.

Many instructors fall prey to the trap of being too comfortable in their teaching and finding themselves trapped in the same mind-numbing routine that led them to explore a career change in the first place.

Continue to attend seminars, workshops, and retreats, continuously refining your own practice and teaching technique.

Each profession has its own stereotype, and many people believe that yoga teachers are ‘enlightened’ individuals who never experience stress or bad emotions.

The responsibility of a yoga teacher is not to achieve mastery of the practice or to attain enlightenment; rather, their objective is to impart what they have learnt through their practice in order to help others.

Biography of the author: Kosta MiachinKosta is the founder of the VIKASA Yogamethod, which is a unique, demanding, and successful approach to yoga. He is also the founder of VIKASA Yoga Academy and a contributor to the website BookYogaRetreats.com.

2. Be Socially Prepared

Changing jobs from 9 to 5 to full-time teaching is a culture shock for many new instructors because of the disparity in working hours between the two jobs. As a new instructor, a significant portion of your time will be spent studying, visiting studios, and developing relationships with other professionals. The majority of your teaching will be done in the mornings and evenings after your regular sessions are established. Weekend seminars and intensives will be added to your schedule as well.

When you work as a freelancer, it might be an isolating experience.

Even if you can still go out to drink on Friday night, you will be unable to give your entire attention to the students in your 9 a.m.

3. Network Your Ass Off

If you are one of the lucky few, getting your ideal career in a local studio is as simple as finishing a teacher training course and earning your dream job. Nevertheless, for the vast majority of instructors, this is not the situation. If you want to make up for the latter, you will need to devote a significant amount of your time to networking and creating a following, which will include visiting studios, sending emails, and attending seminars, to name a few activities. On your quest to establishing a dedicated following, you will come across a variety of people, some of whom may be tough to deal with.

  • Occasionally, you will encounter students who declare that you have changed their lives and who appear ready to continue, but who then fail to show up for class on a subsequent occasion. You will educate folks who are dissatisfied with your teaching method and who give you bad feedback
  • A number of students will go only for the physical practice, while others will attend for the transformative components

Occasionally, you will encounter students who say that you have changed their lives and who appear ready to continue, but who then fail to show up for class on a subsequent occasion; Those who do not like your teaching approach and who give you negative feedback will be your students. Some students will come only for the physical exercise, while others will come for the transformative aspects.

4. Make Time for Your Own Practice

Many professors discover that, when their teaching load increases, they are unable to attend their own classes anymore. Although including self-practice into your daily routine is necessary, it will not assist you in developing your unique teaching style. The only way to improve as a teacher is to continue to learn new things. Making time to attend seminars, workshops, and even retreats will be necessary for your success. Investing the time to increase your own understanding of yoga will help your pupils and allow you to become more effective in your teaching approaches.

5. Get Real About Social Media

Social media has the potential to be a very effective tool. It is not, however, a prerequisite of the job role, and it will not make you a better teacher in any way. In fact, the combination of yoga with Instagram is almost comical in its ridiculousness. Yoga is about non-judgment, the unity of the body, the mind, and the spirit, and it is also about letting go of our egos, as described above. Some of the top instructors in the world don’t even have a social media presence at all. Alternatively, if they do, their posts are either unrelated to yoga or infrequent and infrequent.

In an attempt to outdo one another, people publish images of themselves in asanas on social media.

It’s tough to discern if they’re fighting for likes or simply trying to raise brand awareness. In any case, increasing your online presence will not result in an increase in student enrollment; the only thing that will do so is true personal connection.

6. Learn to Deal with Stereotypes

Despite the fact that every profession has its own set of prejudices, it can be said that yoga teachers face the most difficult task when it comes to not failing their pupils. For some reason, many believe that yoga instructors are ‘enlightened beings,’ free of tension, anxiety, and negativity. This is not the case. This is a ridiculous expectation to have. Teaching yoga is neither a means of achieving enlightenment, nor is it a requirement of the profession, and it is common for teachers to fall short of students’ expectations in this area of the practice.

  • Loss and grief, as well as anger, melancholy, and negativity, will be experienced.
  • Yoga can be beneficial in achieving a state of calm.
  • Becoming a yoga instructor is not an easy method to get out of a humdrum existence.
  • What’s to say you won’t experience the same level of discontent as you did in your previous work once you’ve gotten used to your new yoga lifestyle?
  • To be a good teacher, you must acknowledge that your practice exists as a means of spreading light, connection, and goodwill throughout the world.

Instructors

Email:[email protected] Sara Elizabeth Ivanhoe, M.A., has been teaching yoga since 1995 and is a certified yoga instructor. The Yoga Spokesperson for “Weight Watchers,” “Yoga for Dummies,” and “Crunch Yoga,” she also appeared on “Dr. Drew’s Celebrity Rehab” as the therapeutic teacher on several episodes. Over the course of three years, she was the yoga writer for Health magazine. She has written for and appeared in nearly every yoga and health journal available. Ivanhoe got her master’s degree in Yoga Studies at Loyola Marymount University in 2015, twenty years after graduating with honors from New York University.

Recent collaborations have included a collaboration with Oprah Magazine to co-create the “Just Breathe” brand of yoga and meditation, which is currently taught on Holland America Cruise lines around the world.

The yoga and meditation content curator for Glo, she also teaches in the Yoga Studies department at LMU and is a member of the regular MindfulUSC faculty, where she teaches a 5-week progressive course on sleep as part of her present position.

Laura Baker

Email:[email protected] A Certified Iyengar Yoga Teacher, Laura Baker has been practicing Iyengar Yoga since 2004 and has been teaching it since 2007. (CIYT; Level 1). The Iyengars’ home town of Pune, India, is where she has studied on two occasions, and she has also been to B.K.S. Iyengar’s birthplace in Bellur, India, for an intense retreat. She is also a psychology professor at the University of Southern California and a member of the USC residential faculty. As part of her work with the USC resident halls and her classes in Contemplative Neuroscience, Laura includes Yoga and Mindfulness programs into their offerings.

Salena Collins

Email:[email protected] Salena Collins is a Yoga 120AYoga Therapy Lecturer at the University of Southern California. Salena has been a wellness champion in her hometown of south Los Angeles, as well as the surrounding Inglewood neighborhood, since 2012. She has devoted more than a decade of her life to the practice of yoga and mindfulness. When she first started practicing at Yogaworks in 2005, she was inspired to apply to the Yogaworks 200-hour Teacher Training Program in 2011. She was accepted into the program in 2011.

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A haven for serenity and comfort, Clear Gardens Yoga Studio was established with a commitment to provide the community with high-quality yoga and health tools.

Salena resumed her study at YogaWorks in 2015, earning a 500-hour certification at that time.

During the year 2016, Salena was featured on Fox 11 News and was awarded the City National Bank Rising Star Award for her efforts to promote the practices of yoga and mindfulness to inner city schools.

Siwen Xi

Email:[email protected] Siwen Xi is a Yoga Alliance-certified instructor in Dharma Yoga (a traditional Hatha-Raja Yoga), Yin Yoga, Pregnancy Yoga, and Children Yoga. She has studied and practiced Dharma Yoga for over a decade. She began her yoga and meditation practice in 2010, when she was still in high school, and hasn’t stopped since. She achieved inner peace via yoga and meditation when she was suffering from the anxiety of auditions for music schools and test preparation, as well as the confusion about her future life as a teenager.

  • She is a firm believer in the concept of wu-wei (), which emphasizes non-purposeful activity and doing things without force.
  • The notion of wu-wei causes her to slow down and quiet down her thoughts.
  • Yin Yoga is a discipline that incorporates both ancient Chinese knowledge and standard Hatha yoga asanas from India into one practice.
  • After relocating to New York City to pursue her master’s degree at Columbia University and balancing a demanding life between studies and job, she discovered and was given the chance to learn yoga with her teacher Sri Dharma Mittra and her mentor Pam Jones, which she gratefully accepted.
  • She feels that success is achieved via consistent work, and that all she needs to do is give it her all while not expecting any immediate returns.
  • Yoga practices can help people to create not only a healthy physique, but also a kind heart and a tranquil mind as a result of their efforts.
  • As a result of the fact that our bodies are built differently and that everyone has a unique set of goals and requirements for yoga practice, her instruction is motivating and always includes different variants or adaptations to assist and help everyone’s practice.
  • Her other activities include being a PhD student and a yoga instructor, as well as being a Japanese koto musician.

She has finally made the journey to Los Angeles and is excited about the opportunities that lie ahead. Yoga USC has given her the privilege and excitement of continuing her yoga teaching career!

Gabrielle Lewis

Email:gl [email protected] Gabrielle began her journey into the realm of mental health at the University of Durham, an Ivy league school in England, where she graduated with honors from the Department of Applied Psychology with a first-class honors degree. Because of her interest in learning about the science of how the mind and body are connected, she has pursued studies in the ancient practice of yoga and meditation with instructors who are internationally known. After personally experiencing anxiety and sadness, Gabrielle has discovered that the science of yoga and meditation can be extremely beneficial and really transforming in terms of helping one’s own mental well-being.

She now finds herself teaching in a variety of settings, including mental health facilities, the business sector, colleges, and assisted living homes around the country, as well as presenting at conferences and events and working with a Special Forces unit.

She has recognized education as a critical missing link in the present architecture of how we manage mental illness.

She will accomplish this by delivering an integrative approach to empowering individuals in understanding and supporting their mental health, which will be based on three key principles: education, experience, and evolution, among others.

Jennie Ostendorf

Email:gl [email protected] Gabrielle began her journey into the realm of mental health at the University of Durham, an Ivy league school in England, where she graduated with honors from the Department of Applied Psychology with a first class honors degree in hand. Because of her interest in learning about the science of how the mind and body are connected, she has pursued studies in the ancient practices of yoga and meditation with instructors who are internationally known. After personally experiencing anxiety and sadness, Gabrielle has discovered that the science of yoga and meditation can be extremely beneficial and genuinely transforming in terms of helping one’s own mental health.

As a result, she now finds herself teaching in a variety of settings ranging from mental health facilities to corporate offices, universities, and assisted living facilities around the country, as well as presenting at conferences and events and working with a Special Forces unit.

It is Gabrielle’s vision to provide a new global framework for how we view and treat mental health.

Additionally, Gabrielle has a strong interest in research, serving on the Research Advisory Committee, and is now investigating the stress response in diverse populations and health situations.

Shreya Ranganath

Email:[email protected] Sri Sri Yoga, which incorporates components of Hatha, Raja, Jnana, Karma, and Bhakti yoga, is taught by Shreya Ranganath. She has completed a 200-hour yoga teacher training program. Yoga pranayama (breathing exercises), yoga asanas (postures), and meditation are the three basic components of her instruction. Shreya was lucky enough to participate in a happiness program in Baroda, Gujarat, three years ago, which served as an excellent introduction to the realm of traditional holistic wellness methods.

  • This training assisted her in shifting her perspective and finding light in the midst of difficult circumstances.
  • She was enlightened by the wisdom and began taking lessons on a regular basis.
  • As soon as she got back to her hometown of San Diego in California, she noticed how yoga had been watered down to the point that it was only available to a select set of individuals (skinny, white, and rich).
  • Her studies culminated in her certification as a 200-hour certified yoga teacher via the Sri Sri School of Yoga USA, which is renowned for its emphasis on teaching yogic theory and practice in a traditional setting.
  • She thinks that by using a holistic and real approach, which is faithful to ancient writings such as the Patanjali Yoga Sutras and the Bhagavad-Gita, she would be able to change the stigma surrounding yoga and aid her peers on their road of recovery.
  • She aims to combine her passion for storytelling with production in order to boost the visibility of various voices in the media.
  • Her gratitude for the chance to work with YogaUSC is heartfelt, and she looks forward to getting back on the mat with such a supportive group!

New Yoga Teachers: How to Turn Your Dream Job into Your Dream Career

It’s no longer a mystery that the most successful individuals have habits that they stick to, that they develop routines, and that they learn how to make their days, weeks, months, and years —and therefore their whole lives— better by taking sensible action. However, while the notion of “success” is (and must be) unique to each of us, especially as yoga instructors, habits are unquestionably a key piece of the jigsaw when it comes to achieving our own objectives. We, like any other human being, perform better when we have clear goals, objectives, and a route to follow in order to accomplish them.

So, without further ado, here are six habits that yoga instructors should cultivate in order for their single acts to lead them along the road they choose for themselves.

Keep at Your (Learning) Practice

When we hear that we should “keep at our practice,” as we did when we weren’t teachers, we tend to lose sight of an important point: that we should continue to learn, not only in our asana or meditation practice on the mat, but also in our lives outside of yoga. Beginning our learning journey, we are eager to look for books, YouTube videos, and find our favorite yoga instructors online. Moreover, as yoga instructors, we find ourselves with a limited amount of free time to devote to our students.

Organize Yourself

Sometimes, when we are told to “stay at our practice,” as we were when we weren’t instructors, we overlook one vital aspect: the need of continuing our education, not only in our asana or meditation practice on the mat, but also in our lives outside of the studio. At the beginning of our learning adventure, we’re excited to explore for books, YouTube videos, and to find our favorite yoga teachers online. Moreover, as yoga instructors, we find ourselves with a limited amount of free time on our hands.

Keep the Bigger Picture in Mind and Plan Your Teaching Career

New yoga instructors make this mistake all the time because we are passionate about what we do and find teaching yoga to be quite enjoyable. This strategy is effective for a year or two, perhaps a little longer depending on the type of experiences you have, but it is ineffective over the long run, as you will see below. We, like any other human being, perform better when we have clear goals, objectives, and a route to follow in order to accomplish them. Aside from that, it takes time to figure out where we want to go in life, what interests us, and what works and what doesn’t.

Aside from that, it takes time to figure out where we want to go in life, what interests us, and what works and what doesn’t.

Constantly Work on Your “Ideal Client”

It’s possible that the concept of a “ideal client” seems overly marketing-oriented to you, but bear with me. Ideal clients or yoga students are more than simply customers or students. Due to your in-depth knowledge of them, they are the person you are most suited to assist. The student who will benefit the most from your lectures and offers is not the one who is your ideal customer, but rather the one who can benefit the most because you have a clear image and knowledge of the human being who is behind that name.

It not only helps your pupils on a whole new level, but it also offers you a great degree of confidence since you simply know where to direct your lectures.

Being able to see that you are making the change you set out to make is extremely fulfilling and, as a result, quite inspiring.

Apart from that, as previously indicated, this will assist you in seeing the wider picture. So set aside some time every couple of months to ask yourself, over and over again, who that person is, and let that person to change as you gain more understanding of yourself.

Make Time for Connection

The biggest mistake I made when I first started teaching yoga was not spending enough time in my community, attending classes with other instructors, having discussions on social media (rather than simply posting), and going on coffee dates with people from the health field in general. Find out who you can refer your pupils to when they have questions you don’t know the answers to and become acquainted with them. While I move a lot and never stay in one area for extended periods of time, and the yoga teacher’s schedule is typically different from the standard 9-5 employment, these should not be used as justifications for failing to create meaningful connections with other people.

Now, being sociable is a regular part of my weekly routine, and while it hasn’t had a significant influence on my mental health, it has provided me with a slew of new chances on both a personal and professional level.

Stay Humble

The biggest mistake I made when I first started teaching yoga was not spending enough time in my community, including attending classes with other instructors, having discussions on social media (rather than simply posting), and going on coffee dates with people from the health field in general. Find out who you can refer your kids to when they have questions you don’t have the answers to and get to know them personally. However, because I move about a lot and seldom stay in one area for extended periods of time, and because a yoga teacher’s schedule is often different from the standard 9-5 employment, these should not be used as justifications for failing to create significant connections.

To be sociable has now been a regular part of my weekly routine, and while it has not had a significant influence on my psychological well-being, it has opened the door to many new chances, both personal and professional.

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