Breast Milk Shake-Up

Swirled or shaken? Does shaking actually damage milk – the scientific evidence (Repost from 2014)

One of the most common pieces of advise that women who express milk will receive is regarding the best method to remix the milk once it has been expressed. Human milk separates when it is expressed (see Figure 1) and must be recombined before it can be fed. Figure 1: Three distinct moms’ milk samples (1.5 mL each) were allowed to separate to demonstrate the difference in milk fat. Photograph courtesy of EA Quinn It should come as no surprise that this is yet another site where mothers may find a wealth of information.

Because I am both an anthropological and a bench scientist, I am constantly interested in the natural history of advice.

After doing some research, I discovered three key reasons why expressed milk should always be swirled, rather than shaken: 1) Proteins are denatured as a result of shaking.

3)Shaking causes cell damage.

  1. Starting with PubMed, a nationwide, searchable database of scientific literature, I worked my way down the list (Figure 2).
  2. Stirring breast milk had a similar appearance, but with fewer hits.
  3. Image courtesy of EA Quinn.
  4. Let’s start with the first point: shaking proteins denatures them.
  5. In addition to size changes, there will be significant variances in the way proteins are folded – with denaturing being the unfolding of these proteins — across the different species.
  6. Because literature was out of the question, I turned to mathematics and physics for assistance.
  7. We require two pieces of information in this case: the amount of force created by shaking, and the amount of force required to denature proteins.

This approach is not applicable in this situation; instead, we require a measurement of the shear force required to denature a protein in a liquid media.

If the medium is very viscous (as is milk), it takes a force of 3 x 1014 Pa to denature alpha-amylase (an enzyme involved in starch digestion present in breast milk).

The projected force required to shear a beta protein (in a very viscous media) would be 2 x 105 to 107 Pa, depending on the situation.

Once again, there is no direct measurement for a human shaking a viscous material with high viscosity (but there is plenty of data on ketchup).

Figure 3 shows a diagram of a tetrahedron.

However, boxing, pitching, and shaking are all quite distinct activities – and as a result, there are some fascinating changes in the method in which force must be estimated in each case.

During punching, rotation is required at the waist, shoulder, and elbow.

Shaking, on the other hand, is often performed with a motionless shoulder and torso, with the predominant center of movement occurring at the elbow.

It is surprising that the greatest example for shaking a container found in the literature is swinging a hammer, because the hammer swing is mostly generated by the elbow.

Generally speaking, the average speed for swinging a hammer is 4 meters per second, with maximum speeds approaching 10 meters per second.

While it is true that the forces inside a liquid medium can vary significantly, it is still doubtful that the human arm can create enough force by shaking to cause harm to the proteins in the fluid.

One other element contributes to the protection of proteins in human milk, particularly those that are hormones or immunological factors rather than more nutritionally valuable proteins.

Numerous of these protein hormones may be found in a glycosylated form, which means that the protein has additional sugars linked to it, which assist to maintain the protein structure and limit the likelihood of it becoming denaturized.

Skip ahead to number 3 – shaking causes cell damage – and the math from above is still relevant.

The platelet cell model is used in the majority of the studies looking at shear pressures and cell damage (Christi 2001).

Again, there are no human milk-specific data available – with the exception of centrifugation – so we are using a leukocyte model for the reference cell in this experiment.

During their typical life course, breast milk cells are likely to be subjected to strong shear forces at several stages – from milk ejection to swallowing and digesting – and may be more resistant to cell damage as a result (Papoutsakis 1991).

Once again, there is no information available.

(2013) discovered that samples mixed by ultrasonic waves had higher fat content, suggesting that ultrasonic mixing was more effective at removing fat adhering to the sides of the container than manual mixing.

So, what is the ultimate word on the matter?

Several of the difficulties associated with shaking are more accurately classified as myths, and when the real shear forces are measured, they simply do not hold up to scrutiny.

I believe, on the other hand, that we would not discover much harm.

In response to this misconception, she made a really insightful point: “Really, I believe it’s just one more attempt to make breastfeeding appear super difficult and easy to goof up.” While well-intentioned, it appears to be one piece of advice that, while well-intentioned, may contribute to the persisting notion that human milk is fragile, easily destroyed, and requires a high level of care.

  • *See all of the recalls and allowable insect parts; also, a recent paper showing that formula may be incorrectly prepared as much as 30% of the time.
  • There were several comments when this item was initially published, and the original version featured even more computations than they do now.
  • Because there was no consensus amongst the computations, I will just provide the most fundamental math in this post.
  • This was left out of the discussion above, though, because it would be a worry with baby formula as well (and I couldn’t locate any research that looked into this either).
  • References Bee JS, Stevenson JL, Mehta B, Svitel J, Pollastrini J, Platz R, Freund E, Carpenter JF, Randolph TW.
  • When subjected to intense shear, a concentrated monoclonal antibody formulation responds positively.
  • Biotechnol Bioeng.

Chisti, Yusuf.

Critical Reviews in Biotechnology, 21(2), 67–110 (July/August 2003).

Garca-Lara NR, Escuder-Vieco D, Garca-Algar O, De la Cruz J, Lora D, Pallás-Alonso C.

J Nutr.

Breastfeed Med.

BFM 2011.0079 (DOI: 10.1089/bfm.2011.0079) .

Is it possible for protein molecules to unfold in a straightforward shear flow?

91, no.

3415–3424, 2006.

Proc National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 1997 May 13;94(10):5338-43.

Papoutsakis Animal cells in bioreactors are subjected to fluid-mechanical damage.

1991 Dec;9(12):427-37.

Physics at the United Nations World Assembly.

URL:.

Thomas CR, Dunnill P.

Biotechnology and Bioengineering, vol.

12, 1979, pp.

Shear effects on proteins in solution: a study by Thomas CR and Greer D.

33, no. 3, pp. 443-456, 2010. M.E. van der Veen, D.G. van Iersel, A.J. van der Goot, and R.M. Boom. Activation of alpha-amylase by shear in a simple shear field was investigated. Biotechnology Progress, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 1140–1145.

9 Myths about breastmilk debunked by Pumpables

Do you ever have a question about some of the things that are considered common information regarding breastmilk? Do you have a question about the benefits of breastmilk? In this article, we’ll dispel nine of the most frequent fallacies about breast milk that you may have heard.

1 Breastmilk should not be shaken

You could wonder about some of the things that are considered common knowledge regarding breastfeeding, but you might also be surprised by some of the ones that aren’t. In this article, we’ll dispel nine of the most frequent fallacies about breast milk that you might have heard.

2 If baby doesn’t finish the bottle, leftover breastmilk needs to be thrown away

Wrong! Don’t be concerned if your baby didn’t complete his or her bottle; fresh breastmilk after feeding may be securely stored at ambient temperature for up to 2 hours, in a cooler bag with an ice pack for up to 4 hours, and at the back of the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Breastmilk that has been previously frozen spoils more quickly after feeding than fresh breast milk, but it can be safely stored at room temperature for up to 1 hour, in a cooler bag with an ice pack for up to 2 hours, or in the back of the refrigerator for up to 2 hours after it has been previously frozen.

As a result of heating breastmilk, its physical properties alter, making it more susceptible to contamination (particularly because germs from the baby’s mouth might migrate to it through the teat).

We recommend that you change the teats between each feeding if you have previously given milk of any kind.

3 Breast pump accessories need to be sterilised after each use

There is a wide range of differing viewpoints on this subject, and you should always follow the advice of your health-care practitioner. Breast pump parts will almost certainly need to be sterilized each time they are used if you have a premature infant or if you have health difficulties. In the case of a more mature and healthy newborn, it is acceptable to sterilise the child once per day. Sterilising them too regularly might cause them to break down, and you will lose suction when you use your pump as a result of this.

Always disinfect components before using them for the first time, and wash them in warm soapy water after each use before allowing them to air dry.

Except for valves, the majority of the parts may be placed on the top shelf of the dishwasher.

4 Breastmilk can only be stored for 3 days in the refrigerator

The milk does not need to be thrown out or frozen after three days in the refrigerator, despite the fact that fresh milk is always preferable. Freshly expressed milk can be safely kept in the refrigerator for up to 8 days after it has been expressed.

Unless your health-care practitioner has given you specific instructions (for example, if you have a newborn in the NICU), you can safely store extracted breast milk by following these milk storage recommendations.

5 Babies ‘don’t need’ breastmilk after x months

It’s fairly unusual for parents to believe that when their child begins eating solid meals, it’s time to wean him or her. That practice, on the other hand, has never been substantiated by scientific evidence. Breastmilk continues to be healthy far into toddlerhood and beyond, according to research. When compared to breastmilk generated for newborns, studies have revealed that breastmilk produced for toddlers contains larger levels of protein and fat to accommodate their more active lives. It is true that nursing past the age of toddlerhood is the biological norm, and it may be observed in certain non-industrialized human civilizations today.

It wasn’t until the 1800s when weaning infants before the age of 12 months was considered safe.

6 The amount of breastmilk you pump reflects your milk supply

Because the milk collection bottles have measurement lines printed on them, it is simple to see variations in the volume of milk expressed when pumping the bottles. Many mothers are alarmed by the wide range of products available and fear that their supply is dwindling. This is not correct for a variety of reasons: As a starting point, if you’re used to nursing, you may find that a pump is far less efficient than bub. Many mothers discover that they must pump for far longer periods of time than they would normally nurse in order to produce enough milk for a bottle feeding.

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Many women may be able to pump more each session during the first few days of pregnancy, but they may notice a decline in output around this time and associate it with a decrease in available supply.

Third, as newborns go through growth spurts, they often increase their milk intake, which might result in a drop in expression production when the baby is pumped after feeding.

Finally, as your milk regulates, it is not uncommon for the shape and size of the nipple to alter from what it was at the beginning; this may result in your pump being less effective because the size of the breastshield you require may have changed as well.

7 You can completely empty a breast

As a matter of fact, it is a common misperception that the breast can be entirely emptied since people frequently talk about the success of a pump in terms of how efficiently it empties the breast. When you are lactating, you are really continually generating milk, and this is much more true when you are pumping or nursing your baby. The act of withdrawing milk from the breast stimulates the production of additional milk by the body. Therefore, it is critical that your pump removes milk effectively – so that your body learns to create more, thereby maintaining the supply steady and consistent.

If you’re an exclusive pumper, make sure you pump until letdowns generate only a few drops and then continue pumping for another 5 minutes beyond that point. However, although your breasts may appear to be entirely empty, there is still enough of delicious, fat-rich hindmilk for bub to suckle on.

8 Pumping makes your boobs sag

As a matter of fact, it is a common misperception that the breast can be totally emptied since people frequently refer to the efficiency of a pump in terms of how effectively it empties the breast. Whether you’re lactating, your milk production is continuous, and this is much more true when you’re pumping or nursing your baby. Remove milk from the breasts, and the body will generate more milk as a result of this action. Therefore, it is critical that your pump removes milk effectively – so that your body learns to create more, thereby maintaining the supply steady and consistent.

However, although your breasts may appear to be entirely empty, there is still enough of delicious, fat-rich hindmilk for bub to savor!

9 Breastmilk is only for drinking

Was there a bottle of milk at the back of the fridge or a bag of frozen milk in the freezer that you had completely forgotten about? However, don’t be discouraged — breastmilk may be utilized for a variety of purposes other than simply consuming. Preserve some for topical wounds and rashes, or add some to the bathwater for your child. – Breastmilk has been used to make soaps and lotions by some mothers. Breastmilk may even be used to create jewelry and other souvenirs, according to certain providers.

The options are virtually limitless!

Do you have something you’d want us to look into?

Proper Storage and Preparation of Breast Milk

  • Hands should be washed thoroughly with soap and water. Alternatively, if soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. It is possible for mothers to express breast milk either by hand or with a manual or electronic pump. If you’re using a pump, ensure sure the pump kit and tubing are clean before you use it. Moldy tubing should be discarded and replaced as soon as possible. Use a disinfectant wipe to clean the dials on the pump and on the power switch if you’re using a communal pump

Storing breast milk after expressing:

Other issues, such as where to store breast milk at work or what to do if the power goes out, may come to mind. Visit Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

  • Other issues, such as where to store breast milk at work and what to do if the power goes out, may come to mind. Visit our Frequently Asked Questions page for further information.
  • If you see a bottle with the recycling sign number 7, avoid it since it might be made of a BPA-containing material.
  • Do not store breast milk in disposable bottle liners or plastic bags that are not meant for the purpose of keeping breast milk. Freshly expressed or pumped milk can be preserved in the following ways:
  • Do not store breast milk in disposable bottle liners or plastic bags that are not meant for the purpose of preserving breast milk
  • Following are some options for storing freshly extracted or pumped milk:

Storage tips:

  • Never store breast milk in disposable bottle liners or plastic bags that are not meant for storing breast milk. The following methods of storing freshly extracted or pumped milk are available:
  • Small amounts of milk should be stored in order to avoid wasting milk that may not be completed. Store in 2 to 4 ounce containers, or the quantity administered at a single feeding session. Make sure there is at least one inch of room over the container’s rim since breast milk swells as it freezes.
  • If you’re delivering breast milk to a child care facility, make sure the container is properly labeled with the kid’s name. Discuss any additional requirements for labeling and storing breast milk with your child care provider. When traveling, breast milk can be kept chilled for up to 24 hours in an insulated cooler with frozen ice packs in a refrigerator. When you get at your location, consume the milk immediately or store it in the refrigerator or freezer

Safe Thawing of Breast Milk

  • Always defrost the oldest breast milk first, since it has the most nutrients. Keep in mind that the first in, first out rule applies. Over time, the quality of breast milk might deteriorate
  • There are a variety of methods for thawing frozen breast milk, including:
  • Place in the refrigerator for 24 hours
  • Place in a jar filled with warm or lukewarm water. In a sink full of lukewarm running water
  • Breast milk should never be thawed or heated in the microwave. It is possible that microwaving can destroy nutrients in breast milk and will generate hot patches, which will burn the baby’s mouth. Using breast milk that has been thawed in the refrigerator within 24 hours is recommended. Do not start counting the 24 hours until all of the frozen breast milk has been thawed
  • Instead, start counting from the time you took the breast milk out of the freezer. After the breast milk has been brought to room temperature or warmed, it should be consumed within 2 hours. After breast milk has thawed, it should never be refrozen again.

Feeding Expressed Breast Milk

  • Microwaves should never be used to defrost or heat breast milk. Cooking breast milk in the microwave can deplete nutrients and generate hot patches, which can burn a baby’s lips. Using breast milk that has been thawed in the refrigerator should be done within 24 hours. The 24 hours begin to be counted when all of the frozen breast milk has thawed, not when the breast milk was first removed from the freezer. Breast milk should be consumed within 2 hours of being brought to room temperature or warmed. If your breast milk has thawed, never refreeze it.
  • Breast milk should never be thawed or heated in a microwave. Microwaving breast milk can degrade nutrients and cause hot patches, which can burn a baby’s lips. If you thaw breast milk in the refrigerator, you should use it within 24 hours after receiving it. Do not start counting the 24 hours until all of the breast milk has been completely thawed
  • Instead, start counting from the time you took the breast milk out of the freezer. Breast milk should be used within 2 hours of being brought to room temperature or warmed. Breast milk should never be refrozen after it has been thawed.
  • To ensure that any fat that has separated has been mixed back in, swirl the breast milk.
  • If your baby does not finish the bottle, you should utilize the remaining milk within 2 hours of the baby finishing his or her feeding. Breast milk that has not been consumed within 2 hours should be discarded.

Safe Cleaning of Infant Feeding Items and Pumping Equipment:

Pump equipment, baby bottles, and other feeding devices should be cleaned, sanitized, and stored with care to avoid the possibility of contamination of your breast milk. See the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendations on how to safely clean and preserve pump equipment and newborn feeding items.

  • Detailed instructions on how to properly clean, disinfect, and store infant feeding items. Keep your breast pump kit clean by using the following items: 1.

Shaken Or Stirred? How Does Handling of Breastmilk Impact Composition? Guest Post by Sue Cox, IBCLC

IBCLCs are responsible for incorporating new evidence-based knowledge regarding breastfeeding into practice. This is an important component of their job description. Putting new knowledge into perspective with what has already been established in the field of breastfeeding and in the larger sciences of anatomy and physiology gets more difficult as new information becomes available. Sue Cox, an IBCLC who has worked in the field since 1985 and who has written or presented over 80 papers, is our guest blogger today.

  • Keep an eye out for part two of this essay, which will be published on Wednesday, where she will offer her thoughts on the data on other often asked issues regarding nursing.
  • Within the scope of this blog post, I’ll make a few observations about some of the debates I’ve been reading about on the Internet and hearing about in professional conversations recently.
  • Continued learning necessitates the pursuit of new information as well as the challenge that arises when our own judgments of how things should be done are challenged by others.
  • Kathleen Auerbach is a writer who lives in New York City (1987) J.Hum Lact 3 (J.Hum Lact 3).
  • Being receptive to what we hear is important, but what we hear must always be supported by physiological, biochemical, anatomical, hormonal, and/or psychological understandings in order to be considered valid.
  • 2014.
  • Consequently, there has been discussion regarding how to better equally distribute nutrients, particularly human milkfat, throughout breastmilk during nursing as a result of this.

If you shake a syringe of expressed breastmilk for the purpose of infusing it into preterm newborns, would it homogenize?

A study conducted by Ertugay and Sengul in 2004 found that ultrasound treatment improved the homogenization of milk as well as the particle size distribution of fat in the fat.

Researchers from Garcia-Lara and colleagues (2014) aimed to expand their understanding of the most optimal practice for decreasing fat loss in infused expressed breastmilk for preterm babies in a new study published in Pediatrics.

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In contrast to homogenization, the first two procedures merely replenished the milk, rather than making every drop the same consistency as the first.

Journal of Human Lactation0890334414546044, initially published on August 13, 2014, with the doi:10.1177/0890334414546044 as the citation.

Unlike breastmilk in the ducts, breastmilk in the alveoli is a suspension of whole or skim milk with tiny quantities of fat suspended in it; nevertheless, the majority of the fat is bound to the epithelial lining of the alveoli.

It is a technique in which the fat droplets are emulsified and the cream does not separate from the fat droplets.

E.

Czank, Czank, K.

Hartmann (2009) For use in the newborn critical care unit, a technique for standardizing the fat content of human milk has been developed.

4, No.

Is it possible that shaking the breasts or breast massage may raise the fat content of the meal sooner in the feeding?

When the milking process is completed, the fat content of the milk changes.

Journal of Dairy Research20: 146–153 As discovered by Foda (2004), increased fat levels in post-massage breastmilk were found when samples of expressed milk were taken within 30 minutes of an Okatani massage and then the breast was fully hand expressed after massage.

There was no indication of the influence that the massage may have had on the amount of milk ejections that occurred, which increased the fat content of the milk, nor was there any mention of the degree of fullness or the amount of time that had passed since the last meal.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr.

Morton et al (2012) discovered that when moms who were expressing milk for their preterm newborns employed hand expression and breast compression while pumping, their milk had higher fat and energy levels than usual during the first week postpartum compared to the control group.

Combining manual methods with electric pumping enhances the caloric content of milk in moms of premature children, according to Morton et al.

J Perinatol.32(10):791-6 (October 2006).

Karatas (2011) proposed that the weight trends of healthy breastfed infants at their second and fifth months of life are dependent on the satiety induced by variations in breastmilk ghrelin, leptin, and fat levels between the foremilk and hindmilk between the first and second months of life.

Karatas Z et al., (2011) Breastmilk ghrelin, leptin, and fat levels changing from foremilk to hindmilk: Is this important in self-control of feeding?

2011 Oct;170(10):1273-80.

A number of hypotheses have been advanced to explain how and why the fat detaches, including the following: the decrease in surface area as the alveoli are drained of milk during a feeding (AtwoodHartmann, 1992; Neville, AllenWatters, 1983; Hytten, 1954); the effect of the hormones oxytocin and prolactin, as well as changes in gene expression as the alveoli are drained (AtwoodHartmann, 1992; (Hassiotou et al., 2012; Hall, 1979).

  • Atwood CS, Hartmann PE (1992) Collection of fore and hind milk from the sow and changes in milk content throughout suckling.
  • Journal of Dairy Research, volume 59, pages 287–298.
  • Clinical and chemical research in human breastfeeding were conducted by Hytten FE in 1954.
  • Collecting samples of milk for testing.
  • F.
  • T.
  • E.

Journal of Human Lactation29:171–182.

Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol.

4, pp.

When there are extended periods of time between feeds, does milk separate in the breast?

When the ducts in the breast widen as a result of oxytocin-mediated milk ejection, high-resolution ultrasound pictures (Geddes, 2009) are taken, the flow of milk may be seen in the duct as it is being expelled and in the infant’s oral cavity.

Geddes, D.

The use of ultrasonography to detect milk ejection in women: practical recommendations and hazards.

doi:10.1186/1746-4358-4-5.

(2013) that the maximum fat levels were detected 30 minutes after the conclusion of the milk removal process when milk was expressed prior to, after, and then at 30-minute intervals for three hours after breastfeeds.

The elimination of breastmilk by the newborn has comparable effects on the cell and fat contents of breastmilk, according to Hassiotou et al.

8, no.

e78232 (2013).

doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078232 The claim that homogenization may be accomplished by merely shaking or stirring breastmilk in the breast or in another container is, in conclusion, an inaccurate usage of the term homogenize.

A scientific assessment is required for the usage of the term homogenize in the context of human lactation and nursing. Keep an eye out for Sue’s next guest article, in which she will discuss the research on other important aspects of breastfeeding practice in today’s world.

Shaken breastmilk? – Breastfeeding

/breastfeeding/shakenot.htm (This was copied from the website linked above.) The reason is because shaking expressed mothers’ milk (as well as boiling or freezing it) denatures the protective proteins’ structured molecules, leaving only the amino acids – the components – to protect the baby. When lactoferrin, lysozyme, and other protective components are in their natural structured molecular structure, they may do their protective activity. Even when frozen, shaken, or heated, some of the components retain their integrity.

  • Even when broken down, the individual amino acids are still extremely beneficial and are ingested by the newborn as nutritional supplements.
  • When the beads are worn as a bracelet or necklace, they are carrying out their protective function as well.
  • Physical stress can also cause harm to the components of the cell’s structure and function.
  • You receive at least two functions for the price of one when you consume mother’s milk.
  • And never the cells that are still alive.
  • It is much more than just a great nourishment for newborns; it is also a living tissue that serves as a protective shield.

6 Common Questions About Pumped Breast Milk Answered! — Nanny Magazine

Deborah Ziedbarth, MSN Ed, RN, PhDc, contributed to this article. Human breast milk is better than infant formula in terms of nutritional value and supports a healthy infancy. Employed parents would often begin using a breast pump one to two weeks before returning to their place of employment. The breast milk is then kept in containers in the freezer until it is needed for another purpose. It is critical for nannies (and parents!) to learn how to properly handle breast milk in order to ensure that it retains its nutritious content and does not become contaminated by germs.

The way you manage breast milk can have a significant impact on the health and nutritional status of your child.

Every nanny should be able to answer them:

1. Should I swirl or shake breast milk?

By Deborah Ziedbarth, MSN Education, RN, PhDc A healthy infancy is promoted by human breast milk, which outperforms infant formula. In most cases, working parents will begin using a breast pump one or two weeks before they return to work. The breast milk is then kept in containers in the freezer until it is needed for another procedure. To ensure that breast milk retains its nutritional content and is free of bacterial development, it is critical for nannies (and parents!) to learn how to properly treat the milk.

When it comes to the health and nutrition of your child, how you manage breast milk makes a significant impact. For the following six frequently asked questions, we’ve compiled the following advice from reputable medical sources, which any nanny should be familiar with:

2. What is the best way to defrost frozen breast milk?

The secret to warming breast milk while retaining its full nutritional worth is to prevent overheating the breast milk throughout the process. In order to heat breast milk to about body temperature (98.6 degrees Fahrenheit / 37 degrees Celsius), you must first bring it to room temperature. In reality, it’s merely lukewarm water, not boiling at all. The use of just warm water bath temperatures to heat up milk will prevent the loss of nutrients and the risk of overheating from occurring. It is strongly advised that you thaw the amount of frozen breast milk that you anticipate to use the following day in the refrigerator overnight.

Then, immediately reheat the milk by placing the bottle under warm running water for a couple of minutes.

It is sufficient to use lukewarm water.

3. Can I use a microwave to heat breast milk?

Preventing overheating is essential for warming breast milk while maintaining its full nutritional content. Breast milk should be heated until it reaches 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (37 degrees Celsius), which is roughly body temperature for most people. What you’re looking at is actually lukewarm water, not boiling water. When heating milk, only warm water bath temperatures should be used to minimize the loss of nutrients and the risk of overheating. Warming up the amount of frozen breast milk you intend to use the following day in the refrigerator overnight is highly advised.

Next, defrost frozen milk by putting the bottle under warm running water for a few seconds to speed up the thawing process.

Warm water will suffice in this situation.

4. CAN I USE A BOTTLE WARMER TO WARM UP BREAST MILK?

Yes, you can use an abottle warmer to make the process of warming more efficient. If you do, we recommend that you use caution to prevent scorching your breast milk.

5. What are breast milk storage recommendations?

Depending on where you store your fresh breast milk, the amount of time it will last may vary. In general, the lower the temperature, the better. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following precautions to take:

6. If the baby doesn’t finish a bottle of breast milk, can it be reused?

No, once the infant has finished nursing, any leftover breast milk should be discarded. If you are using a used bottle, do not keep the milk for future feeding since the saliva from your infant might break down the enzymes in the milk.

Again here are some simple tips for warming breast milk.

  • For up to 24 hours, thawed milk can be stored in the refrigerator. Use the freshest milk first
  • The milk can be served cold, at room temperature, or warmed for the baby. Thaw milk by putting it in the refrigerator the night before use, or gently rewarm it by placing the container under warm running water or in a basin of warm water before using it. Do not allow the amount of water in the bowl or the water coming from the faucet to come into contact with the mouth of the container. Never heat breast milk in a microwave oven or on the stovetop since this might produce scorch marks and destroy antibodies in the breast milk. The use of a microwave can potentially damage important minerals and vitamins found in breast milk. Swirl the container of milk to incorporate the cream back into the mixture and ensure that the heat is distributed evenly. Don’t move your hands
  • Leaving milk in a feeding container after a feeding is not recommended
  • It should be destroyed and not used again Once breast milk has been thawed or partially thawed, it should not be refrozen.
References

I just came across a blog article that had some inaccurate information regarding shaking breastmilk. It seemed to me that it was past time to clear the air. The following is an extract from Your Breastfeeding Guidebook that explains the dispute – myth vs fact – around breastfeeding. Is it necessary to shake the milk? Whether you believe it or not, this is a contentious topic. In fact, the longer you breastfeed, the more you will become accustomed to a wide range of seemingly innocuous topics becoming contentious debate topics.

  1. What do you mean, denature?!
  2. Protein is found in large quantities in our bodies (as well as in your baby’s magical breastmilk, which is also amazing).
  3. These enormous molecules will twist, fold, turn, branch, and scrunch together in a variety of ways that are completely unique to each other.
  4. When you denature a protein, you are essentially removing it from its native state.
  5. In the majority of situations, it will not function at all.
  6. I hope you’re still paying attention.
  7. Depending on the protein, the answer to that query will vary significantly.
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Potentially is the operative word here.

There are other proteins that you could actually light ablaze and they would still be alright, according to the research.

As a result, several specialists have come to the conclusion that breastmilk should be spun very gently rather than shaken at all.

First and foremost, I have been unable to locate any published peer-reviewed scientific research that discuss mechanical force as a method for denaturing proteins in human milk that have been peer-reviewed.

They would have to demonstrate that shaking denatures a considerable number of physiologically important proteins and that the loss of those proteins causes the milk to be inferior than non-shaken milk in terms of nutritional value.

All milk is forced out of your mammary gland’s milk ducts through a small aperture in your nipple, which is a small opening in your cervix.

It is then packed in a container of some sort and transported in a bag or a refrigerator.

It is possible that the milk will be transported to and from other containers, leading it to get more agitated as a result.

It is subsequently ingested, where it enters your baby’s stomach, where it is subjected to squeezing and hydrochloric acid, before being expelled.

I agree that forceful shaking is not always the greatest choice, but this is for a different reason than the one stated above.

If your infant takes an excessive amount of air, he or she may have excessive gas.

Furthermore, because there are no studies to support or contradict the notion, it is plausible that severe shaking—the sort that is out of proportion to the regular agitation that milk experiences—could result in some protein change.

Shake or swirl milk gently until further research have been completed that can tell us the truth about the amount of force that is suitable while handling milk. Until then, shake or swirl milk gently.

Breast Milk Handling: stirred not shaken!

“Shaken, not stirred,” says the bartender. No! Not shook, but stirred! Oh my goodness, who would have imagined that the way you mix your breast milk would make a difference? However, proper management of breast milk is essential. It is necessary to proceed with caution. In order to achieve proper mixing of your expressed breast milk, gently swirling it is the best method. Please take one extra minute to carefully mix your breast milk if you are one of the many mothers who devote time to pumping for their baby (which requires devotion).

Breast Milk Handling: Why you shouldn’t shake it!

It’s “shaken, not stirred,” as they say at the bar. No! ‘Shook’ is a misnomer. OMG, who would have believed that the method in which you combine your breast milk would make a difference? Care must be taken in the storage and management of breastmilk. A cautious approach is required. In order to achieve proper mixing of your expressed breast milk, gently swirling it is the best technique. Please take one extra minute to carefully mix your breast milk if you are one of the many mothers who devote time to pumping for their baby (this requires commitment).

Oh no! I’ve Been Shaking My Breast Milk.

Have you been shaking your breast milk that has been stored? Don’t give up hope! It is extremely likely that some of the complete proteins are still intact. Even if they aren’t, you are still providing your kid with something that is far more nutritious than infant formula alone. When newborns drink formula, they never obtain whole proteins; instead, they get only fragments of them. There are many more benefits to breastfeeding than this, and this is true even for shaken breast milk. Are you a working mom who pumps and freezes breast milk to use while you’re away from home?

Inform the person in charge of your baby’s care that the breast milk should be handled with care.

It never occurred to me that you shouldn’t shake breast milk.

Pumping More – the Milkshake and Other Tips You Need to Know

Do you want to produce more milk? Make sure to try the milkshake! That is, we are not referring about the type of cake that is decorated with whipped cream and a cherry on top (although we are not against you tasting that, either). This milkshake approach is frequently employed in conjunction with the Marmet style of hand expressiveness. Have you ever noticed how the flow of milk alternates between stopping and starting during a pumping session? Milk “lets down,” or flows more swiftly, numerous times during a feeding or pumping session, resulting in this phenomenon.

  • As soon as the milk supply begins to slow down when pumping, turn off the pump and wait a few minutes before continuing.
  • Massage the breasts: Begin at the top of the breast and work your way down.
  • Press firmly in a tiny circular motion on one region on the skin with your fingertips as you move them slowly.
  • It is not permissible to slide your fingers over the flesh.
  • Similarly to a breast examination, the pressure and motion are employed in this procedure.
  • Continue stroking in this manner from the chest wall to the nipple all the way around the entire breast.
  • Gently shake the breasts while leaning forward a little.

Massage, stroke, and shake are all acceptable.

You’re giggling now, but you’ll be giggling with delight when step three assists you in getting more milk.

To save time, massage, stroke, or shake both breasts at the same time.

Try “hands-on pumping” for a change.

Make certain that the flange on your pump is the proper size.

If your pump flange is too tiny, you should consider upgrading to a larger size.

If you can find one, invest in a fully automated double pump that is not battery operated but rather is plugged in.

If you require assistance pumping or are worried about your supply, please contact us at any time and we will assist you in determining what is going on and what the best course of action is for you.

Breast Milk Shake-Up

Looking for a better way to pump milk? The milkshake is worth a try! That is, we are not referring about the type of cake that is decorated with whipped cream and a cherry on top (though we are not against you tasting that, either). With the Marmet style of hand expressiveness, this milkshake approach is frequently utilized. Have you ever noticed how the milk flow fluctuates during periods of pumping? Milk “lets down,” or flows more swiftly, multiple times throughout a feeding or pumping session, which causes this.

  • As soon as the milk supply begins to slow down when pumping, turn off the pump and wait a few minutes before continuing.
  • Push your chest wall in with all of your might.
  • After a few seconds, lift up your fingers and go to the next part of your breast.
  • Making use of this massage, spiral around the breast and toward the areola.
  • Light tickle-like strokes should be used on the breast from the chest wall to the nipple.
  • 3.
  • (This is an adaptation of the La Leche League International’s “Manual Expression of Breastmilk Marmet Technique”).

Never skip step three, even if you think doing so would make you look foolish in front of others.

It should just take a couple of minutes to complete the entire procedure.

There are a few more recommendations.

Women who massaged or squeezed their breasts while pumping produced on average 40% more breastmilk, according to one research.

When your nipple is in the tube behind the “horn,” it should be able to move freely back and forth without contacting the edges of the tube.

Improve your pump’s performance by trying something different.

Please keep in mind that if you’re pumping after a feeding, the leftovers in the bottle are not a complete meal.

For assistance with pumping or if you are worried about your supply, please contact us at any time and we will assist you in determining what is going on and how to proceed in the most efficient manner.

Yoga Journal Newsletter

Do you want to make more milk? Take a sip of the milkshake! We’re not talking about the sort with whipped cream and a cherry on top (though we’re not saying you shouldn’t try it). This milkshake approach is frequently employed in conjunction with the Marmet style of hand expressiveness. Have you ever noticed how the flow of milk alternates between stopping and starting throughout a session of pumping? Milk “lets down,” or flows more swiftly, multiple times throughout a feeding or pumping session, causing this.

When milk flow becomes sluggish when pumping, turn off the pump and take a few minutes to.

Massage the breasts: Begin at the top of the breasts and work your way down.

Make little circular motions with your fingertips, moving them gently and firmly on a single region on your skin.

It is not permissible to slide your fingers across the flesh.

A breast examination is performed with pressure and motion comparable to that of a mammogram.

Using a mild tickle-like stroke, massage the breast from the chest wall to the nipple.

3.

(This is an adaptation of the La Leche League International’s “Manual Expression of Breastmilk Marmet Technique”; the original is available here.) Massage, touch, and shake your body.

You’re laughing now, but you’ll be giggling with delight when step three assists you in getting more milk.

Massage / stroke / shake both breasts at the same time to save time and effort.

Try “hands-on pumping” as an alternative.

Make certain that the flange on your pump is the correct size.

If your pump’s flange is too tiny, you should consider upgrading to a larger size.

If you can find one, invest in a fully automated double pump that is not battery operated but rather is plugged in.

If you require assistance pumping or are worried about your supply, please contact us at any time and we will assist you in determining what is going on and what the best course of action is for you!

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