by David Swenson

The head of Yale’s massive endowment fund has died

David Swensen, the long-time chief investment officer at Yale University and a legend in the world of college endowments, passed away on Wednesday at the age of 67. Swensen was a legend in the world of college endowments. Swensen died on Thursday, according to Yale President Peter Salovey, who stated in a statement that Swensen died after “a long and heroic struggle with cancer.” Swensen received his Ph.D. in economics from Yale in 1980, after which he temporarily worked for Wall Street investment banks Lehman Brothers and Salomon Brothers before returning to Yale in 1985 as the head of the Ivy League school’s investment office.

When Swensen became president, Yale’s endowment was worth around $1 billion.

Swensen argued that the institution should place a greater emphasis on equities and alternative assets, such as hedge funds, private equity, venture capital, and real estate, rather than on more stale investments like as bonds.

As reported by the Yale Investment Office, during the past 30 years, the university’s portfolio has generated an average annual return of 12.4 percent on its investments.

  1. If you would like to join me in expressing our collective gratitude for his lifelong devotion to Yale and in conveying our profound condolences to his wife, Meghan McMahon, and their family, please click here to send your message “Salovey penned the piece.
  2. Yale University announced new parameters for how it will invest in energy firms earlier this month.
  3. Most notably, Swensen is credited with helping to design the so-called “Yale Model” of institutional investment, which has subsequently been adopted by a large number of educational endowments and philanthropic organizations to manage their own funds.
  4. Even while it is a more risky method, it has produced significantly higher returns than typical endowment plans, which depend mostly on fixed income assets.
  5. “Throughout Yale and beyond our campus, David will be remembered.

New criteria for how Yale will invest in energy startups were published last month. Still, several high-profile members of the investment community expressed their gratitude to Swensen via social media.

Ashtanga Yoga – David Swenson Personal Biography

What’s NewAboutTeachersWorkshopsNewsletterArticlesLinksMoon Days David Swenson – Personal BiographyDavid Swenson began practicing yoga in 1969 atthe age of 13. His older brother Doug was his first teacher. They practicedHatha yoga from whatever books they could find. David’s introduction toAshtanga yoga came in 1973 when he met David Williams and Nancy Gilgoff inEncinitas, California. In 1975, David and Nancy brought K. Pattabhi Jois to theU.S. for the first time, and Swenson was fortunate enough to be there. Swensonmade his first trip to Mysore in 1977. He is one of a very small number of peoplethat have learned the full Ashtanga system as it was originally taught by K. Pattabhi Jois. David Swenson is recognized today as one of the world’s foremostpractitioners and instructors of Ashtanga yoga. He has produced a wide selection ofvideos, posters and other yoga resources, including the highly popular book,Ashtanga Yoga: The Practice Manual.

‘Self-confident yet selfless’: Yale’s David Swensen dies at 67

The Yale community mourned the death on May 5 of David F. Swensen ’80 Ph.D., whose revolutionary approach to managing Yale’s endowment, warmth of spirit, and personal integrity established him as one of the world’s most admired institutional investors and a beloved member of the Yale community. Swensen had been battling cancer for several years. He had reached the age of 67. He assumed stewardship of Yale’s endowment in the mid-1980s when he was in his early 30s and the endowment was valued at $1.3 billion.

Later in life, he gained international recognition for an approach to institutional investing that emphasized diversification beyond publicly traded stocks and bonds, particularly with illiquid and alternative assets, for his commitment to ethical action in work and life, and for his financial results over a period of decades.

According to Swensen, Yale’s performance throughout his tenure resulted in gains of $45.6 billion in monetary terms, with $36.0 billion in value created relative to the Cambridge Associates mean.

Swensen was widely hailed outside of Yale for his groundbreaking and influential work as an investment manager — and as a mentor to other future top investment managers — but he was also well-regarded within the university as an engaged teacher, a wise and candid counselor, and an active member of the Yale community.

  • The event raised millions of dollars for the university’s community-based partnerships.
  • He was a staunch supporter of Yale Athletics, cheering for multiple varsity teams and was one of the most boisterous spectators in the stands.
  • Professorships, scholarships, and other types of mission-driven support have resulted as a result of this initiative at Yale.
  • “His passion, talent, and generosity will benefit future generations,” says the president.
  • He originally came to Yale as a graduate student in economics in 1975, and he has been there ever since.
  • Tobin’s work on business values was aided by their collaboration on Swensen’s PhD dissertation, which explored the valuation of corporate bonds and provided vital data for Tobin’s work on the valuation of corporations.
  • In the meanwhile, Brainard rose to the position of Yale provost, and in 1985 he engaged Swensen to administer the Yale endowment.
  • Swensen’s creativity has had a particularly and profoundly positive impact on Yale University.
  • Levin put it, “David Swensen revolutionized institutional investment management; his influence can be felt all over the world.” Levin first met Swensen in the 1970s, when the future investment legend was a Yale graduate student and Levin was an assistant professor.

These achievements include the rebuilding of the campus and the revitalization of downtown New Haven, the internationalization of our student body and academic programs, our commitment to making Yale College affordable to all who are admitted, and our investments in world-class science and engineering.” Levin had this to say about David Swensen the man: “Self-assured but unselfish, David was completely dedicated to the institution he loved.” His ability to make snap decisions about individuals was unsurpassed.

He held himself to the greatest standards of honesty and ethical behavior, and he demanded the same of our employees and investment partners.” Swensen addressed the graduating class of 2014 at Commencement festivities.

Brainard Professor of Economics and a former Yale provost described Swensen’s accomplishments in the following way: “When you go through Yale now and look around, what you’re witnessing is David’s legacy.” “Without David, none of this would be possible: the students, the bright buildings, the diversified faculty.” Swensen transformed Yale’s Investments Office into a lean, carefully selected group of around 30 individuals that exemplify not just expertise and aptitude, but also a dedication to Yale’s purpose and vision.

‘Academic training or prior work experience in investments were not required, but a high level of intellectual integrity and potential were,’ said Dean Takahashi ’80 B.A., ’83 M.P.P.M., who met Swensen as a freshman counselor in the 1970s and went on to become one of his closest Yale colleagues and friends.

It wasn’t efficient in the short run, but it produced great rewards in the long run, and it was a wise decision.

Yale’s investing partners were guided by ideals of honesty and commitment to the public’s interest.

He was especially pleased with himself for having assisted in mentoring and developing Investments Office staff members so that they could continue their careers with a mission focus.” The Rockefeller Foundation, Wesleyan University, and Bowdoin College have all hired former members of Swensen’s team to run their investment offices.

Women account for around two-thirds of the group.

According to Takahashi, who worked as a senior director at the Yale Investments Office for 33 years, “astonishingly, six of the 15 top-ranked endowments based on performance over the previous 10 years are administered by Yale Investments Office alumni.” As of this writing, he serves as the creator and executive director of the Carbon Containment Lab at Yale School of the Environment.

On Monday, he and Takahashi conducted the final session of their renowned seminar course, “Investment Analysis,” which was held over the spring semester.

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Takahashi and his colleague were able to “complete each other’s sentences” after more than two decades of co-teaching the course, he explained.

Swensen’s honorary degree was delivered to him in 2014.

“Cappy” Hill ’85 Ph.D., a former president of Vassar College and a senior member on the Yale Board of Trustees, described Swensen as “a remarkable teacher and university citizen.” ” His zeal for learning and mentoring others has benefitted everyone who has come through the investment office, interacted with him through the investment committee of the university, or participated in one of his courses.

  • All those who had the pleasure of knowing him will remember and appreciate his clear passion for and devotion to Yale.
  • Besides his work in the Investments Office, Swensen was intimately and substantially involved in the life of Yale.
  • “The Stock Jocks, the Investments Office softball team, was a favorite of Dave’s,” added Takahashi.
  • Swensen’s dedication was not overlooked by others around him.
  • In 2012, he was awarded the Yale Medal, which recognizes exceptional individual contribution to the university.
  • In his honor, supporters have donated tens of millions of dollars for Yale University through a campaign known as The Swensen Initiative (The Swensen Initiative).
  • Swensen and his wife, Meghan McMahon, in their wedding year of 2014.
  • He became a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in 2017.
  • Please consider making a gift in David’s honor to the Yale David Swensen Initiative in his memory, as requested by his family.
  • Donations can be sent to Yale University, PO Box 2038, New Haven, CT 06521, or dropped off at the university.

Since then, he has served as my mentor, employer, teammate, co-coach, co-teacher, coworker, partner, and supporter, as well as my wife Wendy’s best man and my best friend,” says the author.

David Swensen

The Yale community mourned the death on May 5 of David F. Swensen ’80 Ph.D., whose revolutionary approach to managing Yale’s endowment, warmth of spirit, and personal integrity established him as one of the world’s most admired institutional investors and a beloved member of the Yale community. Swensen had been battling cancer for more than a year when he died. He had reached the age of 67 at the time of the incident. He took control of Yale’s endowment in the mid-1980s when he was in his early 30s and the endowment was valued at $1.3 billion.

Later in life, he gained international recognition for an approach to institutional investing that emphasized diversification beyond publicly traded stocks and bonds, particularly with illiquid and alternative assets, for his commitment to ethical action in work and life, and for his financial performance.

  1. According to Swensen, Yale’s performance throughout his tenure resulted in gains of $45.6 billion in cash terms, with $36.0 billion in value created relative to the Cambridge Associates average.
  2. The investment manager and mentor to several future top investment executives, Swensen was well-known outside of Yale for his groundbreaking and important work as a fund manager.
  3. Swensen was an ardent tennis player and wealthy Yale philanthropist who helped generate money through the annual “Swensen Tennis Extravaganza” (which included golf) that produced millions of dollars for Yale’s community-based partnerships.
  4. In addition to unrestricted giving and scholarship money, his personal generosity supported a variety of university initiatives such as community outreach and collaborations, to mention a few.
  5. Also encouraging people to donate, Swense was known for hosting events to commemorate service anniversaries and retirements, as well as memorial funds.
  6. ‘He was an extraordinary colleague, a good friend, and a cherished mentor to many members of our community,’ Yale President Peter Salovey wrote in a statement to the Yale community following his death.
  7. In 1975, Swensen came to Yale as a graduate student in economics after growing up in Wisconsin and earning his bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls.

Tobin’s work on business values was aided by their collaboration on Swensen’s PhD dissertation, which explored the valuation of corporate bonds and provided vital data for Tobin’s work on the valuation of companies.

In the meanwhile, Brainard rose to the position of Yale provost, and in 1985 he hired Swensen to oversee the university’s endowment management.

This methodology has had a significant impact on institutional investment, and not only at Yale; it is now considered the gold standard for many university endowments and foundations across the country.

As former Yale President Richard C.

As a result of his leadership, the Yale endowment has outperformed the market in recent years, enabling us to accomplish much more than we could have imagined in the past 30 years.

” It was impossible to doubt his ability to judge people in any situation.

Swensen addressed the graduating class of 2014 during Commencement.

Brainard Professor of Economics and a former Yale provost described Swensen’s accomplishments in the following way: “When you go through Yale now and look around, what you’re witnessing is David’s legacy.

‘Academic training or prior work experience in the investment industry were not required, but great intellectual integrity and potential were,’ said Dean Takahashi ’80 B.A., ’83 M.P.P.M., who met Swensen as a freshman counselor in the 1970s and went on to become one of his closest Yale colleagues and friends.

  1. In the short run, it wasn’t very efficient, but in the long run, it was extremely profitable.
  2. “An remarkable part of David’s leadership is his ability to motivate all those around him to achieve their best and to adhere to the cause of higher education and philanthropic work,” Takahashi stated.
  3. Among his many accomplishments, Dave was a pioneer in the endowment and institutional investment sector, not only in developing the Yale model of asset allocation, but also in encouraging diversity and battling climate change, as well as in ethical investing practices.
  4. The Rockefeller Foundation, Wesleyan University, and Bowdoin College have all hired former members of Swensen’s team to run their investment offices.
  5. Women account for around two-thirds of the group.
  6. in 2000 and an M.B.A.

According to Takahashi, who worked as a senior director at the Yale Investments Office for 33 years, “astonishingly, six of the 15 top-ranked endowments based on performance over the previous ten years are administered by Yale Investments Office alumni.” As of this writing, he serves as the founding and executive director of the Carbon Containment Lab at Yale School of the Environment.

  1. The penultimate spring semester session of their renowned seminar course, “Investment Analysis,” was held on Monday, and he and Takahashi were the instructors in attendance.
  2. Takahashi and his colleague were able to “complete each other’s sentences” after more than two decades of co-teaching the course.
  3. “and teacher,” Polak added to the formal tribute in 2014.
  4. “A wonderful teacher and university citizen,” said Catharine B.
  5. ” His zeal for learning and mentoring others has benefitted everyone who has come through the investment office, interacted with him through the investment committee of the university, or participated in one of his courses.

He will be remembered and valued by all those who had the pleasure of knowing him.” By writing two books — “Pioneering Portfolio Management: An Unconventional Approach to Institutional Investment” and “Unconventional Success: A Fundamental Approach to Personal Investment” — Swensen not only helped the investment community learn about his way of thinking, but he also helped the rest of the world learn about his way of thinking as well.

  • Aside from his work at the Investments Office, Swensen was deeply and substantially involved in the life of Yale.
  • Tahashi recalls that Dave was a big fan of the Stock Jocks, the Investments Office softball team.
  • “We used to joke that Dave was the largest, most passionate freshmen even though he was a successful graduate student in economics,” Takahashi said from their undergraduate days.
  • At the commencement ceremony of Yale University in 2014, he was presented with an honorary doctor of humane letters.
  • Earlier in the year, he was awarded the Mory’s Cup for distinguished service to Yale University.
  • SWENSEN HOUSE and SWENSEN TOWER are the names of the Berkeley College administration’s house and the iconic tower of the restored Hall of Graduate Studies, which is now known as the Humanities Quadrangle at Yale.
  • Swensen and his wife in 2014.
  • In 2017, he was elected to membership in the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR).
  • He lived in Connecticut.
  • This particular fund helps to support activities, initiatives, and individuals who were particularly valuable to David throughout his lifetime.
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In the words of Takahashi, “Dave was a famous pioneering investor who created enormous value for Yale University as well as many other endowments and nonprofits.” To me, what was exceptional and special was how much he loved and cared about Meghan, as well as for their families, friends, and Yale University, and how he was able to lead and inspire everyone around him.” Berkeley College freshman advisor in Wright Hall 45 years ago was an incredible blessing, and I consider myself extremely fortunate to have known him.

Since then, he has served as my mentor, employer, teammate, co-coach, co-teacher, coworker, partner, and supporter, as well as my wife Wendy’s best man and my best friend,” says the author. “

David Swensen, Who Revolutionized Endowment Investing, Dies at 67

In New Haven, Conn., on Wednesday, David Swensen died after a long battle with cancer. He had given up a lucrative Wall Street career in order to overseeYaleUniversity’s endowment, and he proceeded to revolutionize endowment investing by making Yale’s the best-performing fund in the country over a 20-year period. He had reached the age of 67. His wife, Meghan McMahon, stated that the cause of his death was kidney cancer, which he had been suffering from since 2012. Yale New Haven Hospital was the site of his death.

  1. Swensen pioneered the change from a formulaic menu of stocks and bonds to a portfolio that included hedge funds, timberlands, and other alternative investments.
  2. Since then, it has risen to $31.2 billion, surpassing the sums held by Princeton and the University of Texas, and following only the sums held by Harvard University and Stanford University.
  3. Swensen was pleased with how the university’s rising endowment had assisted the institution in its contribution to financial aid.
  4. Mr.
  5. He was able to employ his protégés quickly from a variety of universities, including Princeton, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Bowdoin College in Maine.
  6. Dries Schwartz Vieira for The New York Times is credited with this image.
  7. Nevertheless, his brother Dr.

“He has never expressed any interest in doing anything other than handling the endowment to the best of his ability,” Dr.

Swensen.

No amount of money or a greater position was ever a goal for him.

Swensen’s pupils were also known to avoid Wall Street on occasion.

Swensen had “inspired individuals in the same way he attracted them,” according to Andy Golden, who is in charge of Princeton’s endowment fund.

At Salomon, he was instrumental in putting together the world’s first currency exchange, which involved IBM and the World Bank.

Mr.

His personal feelings were hurt when endowment managers utilized that position to boost their professional reputations.

The New York Times quoted him as saying, “When I see colleagues of mine leave universities to do essentially the same thing they were doing but to get paid more, I am disappointed, because there is a sense of mission.” “When I see colleagues of mine leave universities to do essentially the same thing they were doing but to get paid more, I am disappointed,” he said in a 2007 interview.

  • He graduated from the University of Iowa in 1974.
  • After raising their six children, his mother, Grace (Hartman) Swensen, went on to become a Lutheran preacher herself.
  • Swensen was younger, he was fascinated by finance.
  • The method was implemented into the Yale portfolio shortly after Mr.
  • According to his remarks in the 2014 interview, when he joined, alternatives such as real estate and venture capital comprised only a small portion of the endowment’s total assets.
  • “I was motivated to boost the diversification of Yale’s portfolio by a combination of common sense (don’t put all your eggs in one basket) and finance theory (diversification is a free lunch),” he explained.
  • In the academic community, there is significant controversy over whether he was the first to broaden his interests.
  • Mr.
  • Some business schools required students to read it as part of their curriculum.

To determine who knew the firm best before investing in Chieftain Capital Management, for example, he phoned some of the company’s major shareholders and asked them, “Who actually understands your company well?” According to Glenn Greenberg, a Chieftain co-founder, “No other investors conducted research in that manner.” Mr.

  1. he rejected to invest with Steven Cohen, the hedge fund manager whose firm failed after some of his traders were convicted of insider trading, since Mr.
  2. In addition, he declined to invest in ESL Partners, which is headed by Edward Lampert, since Mr.
  3. Yale’s money attracted the attention of numerous investment managers in the financial world.
  4. Swensen was nominated to President Barack Obama’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board in the aftermath of the global financial crisis of 2008.
  5. Another setback was experienced by other colleges that had adopted his methodology.
  6. ImageCredit.
  7. Swensen’s investment plan was first questioned, experts eventually concluded that a straightforward mix of equities and bonds would have been preferable.

Yale outperformed the rest of the sector in 2014, earning a 20.2 percent return on its investment.

According to Charles Skorina, whose business hires chief investment officers, it was the third-best performance among the nation’s major university endowments over a 10-year period ending on June 30, 2020, according to Charles Skorina.

In addition to managing the endowment, Mr.

He was frequently quoted by his wife, Ms.

“I never fail to take anything away from them.” Mr.

Whenever feasible, he encouraged them to maintain their offices on campus, and he was sympathetic to issues that students brought up, such as climate change.

Despite acknowledging that greenhouse gas emissions represented a serious concern, Mr.

Recent estimates from the investment office indicate that 2.6 percent of the endowment is invested in fossil fuel producers, which is a multi-decade low, and that the office anticipates the fall to continue.

Swensen stated that Yale will not make investments in businesses that sell assault weapons, according to the New York Times.

His involvement with several organizations, including the Brookings Institution, the Carnegie Corporation, the Courtauld Institute of Art, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, and the governments of Connecticut and Massachusetts, has spanned more than four decades.

Swensen’s first wife, was divorced after a short period of time.

McMahon, he is survived by his mother, Grace, three children from his previous marriage, Alexander Swensen, Timothy Swensen, and Victoria Coleman; his father, Daniel; two brothers, Stephen and Daniel; three sisters, Linda Haefemeyer and Carolyn Popp; and two grandkids.

Mr.

The author of the 1995 book “Unconventional Success: A Fundamental Approach to Personal Investment” recommended that investors keep their costs low and stick with exchange-traded funds, which invest across an entire index of stocks, rather than investing with money managers or mutual funds, where the costs can erode profits.

According to him, it was almost hard for the typical investor to get entry into the top private funds. Alex Traub provided reporting assistance.

David Swenson

DETAILS ABOUT THE WORKSHOP (SATURDAY, OCT 23) Primary Series Flow: Dancing with the Breath in a First Series with a Fully Led Lead Rhythm 2-hour class period PLUS 1-Hour Question and Answer Session 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. – (SOLD OUT) This session is intended for people who are already familiar with the First Series of Ashtanga Yoga, but it is accessible to students of all levels of ability, from the dedicated daily practitioners to the inexperienced weekend warriors who squeeze it in when they can, and everyone in between.

  • Beginning at the beginning of class, David will spend some time introducing other options to some of the more hard asanas, as well as offering more user-friendly vinyasa options.
  • Items that are required: The Mat and the Breath In this fun-filled study of Vinyasa and arm-balances, you’ll learn how to fly, float, and stand on your hands.
  • The vinyasa will be disassembled and dissected into its constituent parts in order to investigate strategies for increasing the lightness and efficiency of practice while exerting less effort in order to reach more ease.
  • When we are asked to balance on our hands, it is natural for us to feel intimidated or even scared.
  • There will be opportunities for both pair work and individual methods to be taught.
  • Attendees of all skill levels are welcome, even if they have never performed a handstand before.
  • Come and Experience the Exhilaration of Flying!
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-$40 per person When we first come into this world, we inhale, and when we leave, we exhale.

Breath is the most fundamental aspect of our existence, because it binds all of mankind, yet we pay little attention to it.

It is the goal of this workshop to explore the worlds of specialized Yogic Breathing, as well as the subtle and sometimes misunderstood internal energy valves known as Bandhas.

Pattabhi Jois, as well as many practical exercises he has devised to aid the practitioner in developing a stronger knowledge of these delicate yet powerful energy gates of yoga.

Attendees will undoubtedly go away with new perspectives and practical skills to put into practice.

DETAILS ABOUT THE WORKSHOP (SUNDAY, OCT 24) Intermediate Series for the sake of entertainment!

to 12:00 p.m.

In his presentation of the asanas, David will demonstrate compassion, patience, and humor.

David will make his way through the entire series in a logical manner, providing options and user-friendly alternatives as he goes.

Learn about Intermediate Series through a compassionate presentation.

: A Fun-Filled Exploration of the Art of Not Falling is a fun-filled exploration of the art of not falling.

Sunday, October 24 – $50 per person Balance can be one of the most difficult components of practice, whether we are standing on our feet, our hands, our heads, or any other portion of our bodies.

The session will include both partner practice and individual pursuits of balance in a variety of asanas throughout the course.

Regardless of the yoga school one practices, there will undoubtedly be a lot of knowledge learned from this lesson that can be utilized both on and off the mat!

Traditional Chinese Medicine and Everyday Life: Ancient Solutions for Modern Challenges 4:00 p.m.

Sunday, October 24 -$40 per person When we go further into the complicated and complex philosophy of Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, we discover a very profound simplicity that can be utilized in the context of our everyday lives.

What is the use of philosophy if it cannot be put into practice? We can remember lines or stanzas from great works of literature, but unless we can put them into practice in our everyday lives, they are only words spoken rather than knowledge realized. Real-World Tools for Real-World Applications!

David Swenson R.Ph. – Principal, ConstellationRx Consulting – ConstellationRx Consulting

DESCRIPTION OF THE WORKSHOP (SATURDAY, OCT 23) Dance with your breath in the first series of the Fully Led Primary Series: Dancing with the Breath Rhythm lesson of two hours PLUS Session of 1-hour Q & A Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (SOLD OUT) This session is intended for people who are already familiar with the First Series of Ashtanga Yoga, but it is accessible to students of all levels of ability, from everyday practitioners to inexperienced weekend warriors who squeeze it in when they can, and everyone in between.

  • Beginning at the beginning of class, David will spend some time introducing other solutions to some of the more hard asanas, as well as offering more user-friendly vinyasa alternatives.
  • Item(s) that must be included: Mat and Breath: a meditation on relaxation In this fun-filled examination of Vinyasa and arm-balances, you’ll learn how to fly, float, and do handstands.
  • The vinyasa will be disassembled and dissected into its constituent parts in order to investigate strategies for increasing the lightness and efficiency of practice while exerting less effort to obtain more ease.
  • When we are asked to balance on our hands, it is typical to feel intimidated or even scared.
  • In addition to solo skills, there will be partner work available.
  • Even if you’ve never done a handstand before, everyone is welcome to participate.
  • We invite you to come and experience the wonder and excitement of flight!

This is our first and last act of life.

When it came to controlling breath in order to achieve control of the mind and perceive the world with more clarity, the ancient yogis gave it a lot of consideration and created complicated techniques of doing so.

As part of his presentation, David will offer material he received directly from K.

When it comes to communicating complicated ideas in simple words, David is unsurpassed.

Let yourself be carried away by the Prana.

PLUS: a one-hour question and answer session Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m.

Even though many individuals are terrified or fearful of the Intermediate Series of Ashtanga, it is certainly one of the most entertaining and thrilling sequences to learn and practice.

It is intended for seasoned Ashtanga practitioners, but anybody interested in learning more about this dynamic routine is welcome to join us.

Following class, there will be an open discussion in which students will be able to ask David questions regarding any issues of interest to them.

: A Fun-Filled Exploration of the Art of Not Falling is a fun-filled exploration of the art of not falling In excess of 1:45–3:00 pm 50 dollars on Sunday, October 24.

David will discuss his personal views and approaches for achieving balance in an unpredictable environment, which he has learned from his own experiences.

Unexpectedly, there are many parallels between the methods of finding physical and emotional balance in our bodies and the methods of achieving balance in our lives.

It Is Not Required to Fall During the Game!

We will cover the Eight Limbs of Ashtanga Yoga and how they might be applied to the obstacles of everyday life in this class.

With no practical application, what is the point of philosophy? We can remember lines or stanzas from great works of literature, but unless we can put them into practice in our daily lives, they are only words spoken rather than knowledge realized. Authentic Resources for Everyday Use.

About

David D. Swenson is a Principal with ConstellationRx Consulting, where he formerly worked for BD’s Medication Management Solutions company for 11 years in the Dispensing and Preparation Technologies group. As of April 2019, he was no longer employed by Becton Dickinson in his job as Vice President, Clinical Strategy Medical Affairs for the company’s Medication Management solutions. Over the course of his career, David has held a variety of leadership positions, including Vice President of Medical Affairs.

  • In his previous role as Co-Founder and Chief Clinical Officer at IntelliDOT Corp, which recently converted to PatientSafe Solutions, he worked with Becton Dickinson and CareFusion, among other companies.
  • Swenson was also responsible for critical components of the company’s general strategy.
  • Swenson is a hospital pharmacist and patient safety specialist.
  • Swenson’s professional history.
  • He was responsible for the development of many features that are now standard in medication dispensing systems, including the Medstation-Rx System, which was the world’s first pharmacy profile-driven medication cabinet system.

Swenson worked as Vice President, Marketing and Clinical Services for Woodside Biomedical, which developed the first and only non-invasive treatment for nausea and vomiting, which was approved by the FDA for use in the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with pregnancy, post-operative nausea, chemotherapy, and motion sickness, among other conditions.

Mr.

in Pharmacy.

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