Lost That Lovin’ Feeling?

You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ — The Righteous Brothers’ song was ‘too long’ to be a hit

Tom Cruise is well-known for doing many of his own stunts, but none are more likely to cause anxiety in the audience than when, in the 1986 action filmTop Gun, he sings “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” while playing Pete “Maverick” Mitchell to Kelly McGillis’s Charlie. Cruise became a megastar thanks to Top Gun, but it wasn’t because of his singing. The song appears once more towards the film’s gloriously cheesy conclusion, but this time, happily, it is the originalRighteous Brothers version, which Charlie listens to on a jukebox in a local establishment.

“We had no clue if it would be a smash,” Righteous Brother Bill Medley, one half of the duet with the late Bobby Hatfield, has stated of the break-up song.

He was previously praised for his groundbreaking production skills, but he is now recognized as a convicted murderer, having shot and killed actress Lana Clarkson at his home in 2003.

One of the best instances of his “wall of sound,” a rich, symphonic structure built by recording big groups of musicians performing simultaneously and employing studio wizardry, is “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’,” which is recognized as one of the finest examples of his “wall of sound.” It was at Spector’s office that Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham first heard the song, according to his book2Stoned: “I had no clue what it was, but I couldn’t believe my ears.

It was the most fantastic thing I’d ever heard.” It sounded as if Jesus had risen from the dead during the last chorus.

The song is about the dissolution of a romantic relationship.

Some listeners were mislead to believe that the record was being played at the incorrect pace due to the moderate tempo and relatively low tone of his voice, according to reports.

When tenor Hatfield comes in for the chorus, at the conclusion of the song it appears like the singers are hopeful that passion may be reignited, that they will be able to “bring back that lovin’ feelin’.” “The album is built on the lengthy bridge part — ‘Baby, baby, I’d go down on my knees for you’ — which takes up about a third of the track, according to author and popular music historian Dai Griffiths.

  • Remove the bridge and the song becomes a highly emotional piece; add the bridge back in and the song becomes a timeless, classic record.
  • — the loop is repeated 13 times in total.” “The bridge is based upon a basic harmonic loop – ‘Summer Nights’ fromGrease, anyone?
  • In January 1965, Black’s cover made it into the top 30 at number 28.
  • Black maintained his lead for a few of weeks, but he peaked at number two, having been beaten to the top spot by the duet who had come into the country to bolster their attack on the charts.

Oldham, who was in charge of The Righteous Brothers’ UK operations, was irritated by Black’s upstart rendition, and decided to take out an ad in the music press proclaiming his guys’ album as “the Last word in Tomorrow’s sound Today.” There have been several musicians who have recorded the song since it was initially released in 1967 by Black.

  • More than 200 different covers have been created.
  • The Firm, the Jimmy Page and Paul Rodgers “supergroup,” released a rendition of the song on their eponymous 1985 album, featuring Tony Franklin’s fretless bass prominently in the mix.
  • It has a universally appealing allure.
  • Kelly McGillis stated in an interview that she would be content if she never heard the music again.
  • Please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

It will be released by Brewer’s Publishing in the fall of 2014. The following labels are responsible for the music: Spectrum, G Records, Rhino Atlantic, and S Records. Image courtesy of Walt Disney Television via Getty Images

The Story Behind “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” By The Righteous Brothers

Viajarichards99utube/YouTube

Not An Easy Single To Make

Upon signing The Righteous Brothers to his company, Philles Records, producer Phil Spector requested that they record a song that would complement their blue-eyed soul sound. As a result, he commissioned Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, a husband-and-wife songwriting combination, to compose a hit single for them. Upon their arrival in Los Angeles, Spector even flew them to the Chateau Marmont and checked them in. A ballad was being written at the same time that The Four Tops’ debut Motown record, “Baby I Need Your Loving,” was ascending the charts, and so Mann and Weil took inspiration from that and decided to write one themselves.

  • In addition, he began by composing the tune.
  • When the pair was having trouble with the bridge and ending, Spector played the riff from the Vibrations’ “Hang On Sloopy” and adapted it for the bridge.
  • The Righteous Brothers liked it when it was brought to their attention, but Bill Medley wasn’t convinced it would work with their style.
  • Spector also made use of his well-known “Wall of Sound” production approach.
  • “We had no clue if it would be a big hit,” he said.
  • I was so unwell that I had a spastic colon and developed an ulcer.” “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” was a hit with the audience.
  • In addition, it was covered by a number of musicians.

You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ by The Righteous Brothers – Songfacts

  • A report by the BMI music publishing company claims that “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” was aired on American radio and television more times than any other song throughout the twentieth century. From the time of its debut till the year 2000, it received more than 8 million plays. Notably, this includes all versions of the song, not just the one performed by The Righteous Brothers. The song was written at the request of Phil Spector, who was looking for a hit for an act he had just signed to his Philles label, the Righteous Brothers, when Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil came up with the idea. They scored a few modest songs on the Moonglow label before signing with Spector, including “Little Latin Lupe Lu” (49) and “My Babe” (50). ( 75). These songs were listened to by Mann and Weil in order to gain a sense of their sound, and they chose to create a ballad for them. They were inspired by The Four Tops’ song ” Baby I Need Your Loving,” and they wrote this song about a desperate attempt to reestablish a long-lost love relationship. Even though the title “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” was merely a placeholder until they could come up with something better, Spector felt it was fantastic, so they decided to go with it instead. When Mann and Weil finished writing the song, they took it to Spector’s residence, where Phil collaborated with them to write the iconic bridge (“Baaaby.”) I require your affection.”). As the Righteous Brothers’ first single to be released on Philles Records, the song went to #1, giving both the duo and the songwriting team of MannWeil their first #1 success together. It was Phil Spector’s third number one hit as a producer
  • He had previously achieved success with ” To Know Him Is To Love Him ” by The Teddy Bears and ” He’s A Rebel ” by The Crystals. Phil Spector produced this song using his famous “Wall of Sound” recording technique, which he had previously achieved success with ” To Know Him Is To Love Him ” by The Teddy Bears. Spector was given a songwriting credit on the single, since he often demanded one at this period and possessed the necessary influence to secure one. Bill Medley recalls spending around eight hours with Spector on the vocals for this song, according to Cynthia Weil, who has stated that Spector never truly created songs, but rather “influenced” them. As a result, they had to record over earlier takes in order to lay down a fresh one, which was a time-consuming operation. Aside from that, Spector was quite picky about the performances. When Medley produced The Righteous Brothers’ album cuts, he would typically spend about 30 minutes working on the vocals
  • Phil Spector was determined to make this his finest production to date, and he wanted it to be better than anything released by current top producers like Berry Gordy, George Martin, Andrew Loog Oldham, and Brian Wilson. Medley produced some of The Righteous Brothers’ album cuts, and he would usually spend about 30 minutes working on the vocals. He picked the Righteous Brothers because of their incredible singing abilities, and he solicited the help of his old jazz guitar idol Barney Kessel to perform on the track. Among the other musicians that contributed to the tune were Los Angeles studio musicians Carol Kaye (acoustic guitar), Earl Palmer (drums), and Ray Pohlman (bass) (bass). Cher, who collaborated with Spector on a number of projects early in her career, may also be heard on background vocals at the song’s conclusion. The fact that Spector was the first prominent West Coast producer to require the musicians to wear headphones meant that when they heard the song, they heard it with all of the processing he had applied, which in this instance meant a lot of echo. This forced the musicians out of their comfort zones and forced them to collaborate in order to produce a cohesive sound. Spector didn’t mind spending more time on a single track than he would on four songs in a typical 3-hour session
  • In our interview with Bill Medley, he revealed that when Mann and Weil played them a demo of this song, he and his band made Bobby Hatfield think, “Wow, what a good song for the Everly Brothers,” because the version they heard wowed them. In our interview with Bill Medley, he revealed that when Mann and Weil played them a demo “They were singing it a lot higher than we were, so they started lowering it and lowering it and lowering it, and Phil slowed it down to that beautiful beat that it was,” Medley explained. ” My memory of being in the studio with Phil is that we weren’t used to putting in so much effort into our tunes. The opening lyric, “You never close your eyes any more when I kiss your lips,” was inspired by the Paris Sisters’ song “I Love How You Love Me,” which opens, “I love how your eyes close everytime I kiss you.” Spector set the time on the single at 3:05 a.m. so that radio stations would play it. Despite the fact that the song’s real duration is 3:50, radio stations at the time seldom broadcast tracks that were more than 3 minutes long. It took a bit for radio station program directors to find out why their playlists were getting too long, but by that time, the song had become a smash success. A clever allusion to this is made by Billy Joel in his song ” The Entertainer,” in which he says, “If you’re going to have a success you have to make it fit, so they trimmed it down to 3:05.” The Righteous Brothers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame the same year as Billy Joel. Phil Spector put in a significant amount of time (and around $35,000) into this production, but the finished product was so out of the ordinary that he began to question whether he had stumbled across a potential hit on his hands. He performed the song for the following individuals in order to obtain a second, third, and fourth opinion: 1) Barry Mann, one of the song’s co-writers, who was sure that the song had been recorded at an incorrect pace. Spector spoke with his engineer, Larry Levine, to establish that the track was intended to sound like that. Don Kirshner, Spector’s publisher, was well-liked and renowned for his musical judgment. Mr. Kirshner felt it was fantastic but proposed that the title be changed to “Bring Back That Lovin’ Feelin” instead. 3) Murray the K, a well-known disc jockey in New York City. Murray was informed by Spector that the song was over four minutes in length (despite the label’s claim that it was 3:05), and Spector wanted to ensure that Murray would play it. Though Murray believed that the song was wonderful, he recommended that the bass line in the middle be moved to the beginning. Spector took all three points of view as criticism and became quite uneasy. A 2003 interview withTelegraph Magazine quoted Spector as saying, “I was slain by my co-writer, co-publisher, and the number-one disc jockey in the United States of America.” “When the record was released, I couldn’t sleep for a week.” My condition deteriorated to the point that I developed a spastic colon and an ulcer.”
  • This song received a boost when The Righteous Brothers sang it on the variety show Shindig!, which premiered in 1964, only a few months before this song was recorded. Medley and Hatfield were regulars on the show, and their appearances usually elicited shouts from the large number of young female viewers in attendance. Appearances on the show provided them with national exposure, which, when paired with the release of this song, propelled them to the top of the music charts overnight. As Medley explained to us, “it would be like being on American Idol every week.” “After we finished recording ‘Lovin’ Feelin’,’ our lives changed dramatically, and it happened very quickly. It was featured in the 1986 film Top Gun in a sequence when Tom Cruise sings it to seduce Kelly McGillis, and it has since gained widespread popularity. The song’s writers Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil performed it for The Righteous Brothers, who were enthralled by it, but Bobby Hatfield was perplexed because the duo usually shared lead vocals and he was relegated to a minor role in this song. When Cruise traveled to Asia, fans frequently asked him to sing it. “What am I supposed to do while he’s singing the entire first verse?” Hatfield wondered. After hearing this, Phil Spector responded, “You may go immediately to the bank.” Phil Spector purchased the remaining two and a half years of the Righteous Brothers’ contract with Moonglow Records (with whom they had regional hits such as “Little Latin Lupe Lu,” which was later covered by Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels), in order to sign them. According to Spector, the Righteous Brothers were adamant about not recording the song because they considered themselves to be more in the realm of rock and doo-wop. In response to the success of this song, Moonglow published a large amount of their previously unreleased Righteous Brothers work in order to profit on the demand
  • Some of the musicians that covered this song include Elvis, Dionne Warwick, Hall & Oates, and Neil Diamond, to name a few examples. Warwick’s version reached number 16 in 1969, while Hall and Oates’ hot run began with their rendition of the song, which reached number 12 in 1980 (they followed it up with the hits “Kiss on My List” and “You Make My Dreams”). On that same LP, Voices, was also the original version of “Everytime You Go Away,” which went on to become a #1 success for Paul Young. Hall and Oates ultimately surpassed The Righteous Brothers as the best-selling duo of all time
  • This is the only song by them to reach the Top 10 in the United Kingdom. This happened three times. It did it in 1965, and it did it again in 1969 and 1990, when it was re-released. The re-release of “Unchained Melody” in 1990 was spurred by the re-emergence of the song, which had previously achieved success1 after being used in the filmGhost. The re-release of “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” landed at number three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart
  • Bill Medley told Rolling Stone magazine, “We had no clue if it would be a smash.” I felt that it was moving too slowly, taking too long, and taking place smack in the thick of The Beatles and the British Invasion.” The following is an excerpt from the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 best songs of all time: In San Francisco, Spector was guiding the musicians for a Ronettes gig when he made the decision to sign the Righteous Brothers, who were also scheduled to perform. He then tasked Mann and Weil with the task of creating a hit song for them. The first thing that drew listeners’ attention was Bill Medley’s unbelievably deep introduction. “When Phil played it for me over the phone,’ Mann recalled, “I said, “Phil, you have it on the wrong speed!”‘
  • The Rolling Stones’ manager, Andrew Loog Oldham, took out advertisements in British trade papers proclaiming that the Righteous Brothers’ version was the greatest record ever made
  • And A version by Cilla Black, which was released just before The Righteous Brothers’ version, was released in the UK just before The Righteous Brothers’ version. Both songs debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 in the same week, with Black’s at number 2 and The Righteous Brothers’ at number 3. The next week, The Righteous Brothers’ version reached number one in the United Kingdom, giving Phil Spector his first1 UK success. In 2003, The Righteous Brothers sang this song to start the proceedings for their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony. It was an odd coincidence that Phil Spector was arrested on murder charges just a month before the ceremony
  • Glen Campbell, before he became a successful Country/Pop recording artist, was one of approximately 50 Los Angeles session musicians who played on many of the 1960s hit records
  • And Phil Spector was arrested on murder charges just a month before the ceremony. Phil Spector employed him as a guitarist on a number of his works, the most well-known of which being this song. According to a 2011 interview with the UK publication The Daily Telegraph, Campbell was asked how it was to collaborate with the problematic producer. “He was a peculiar individual. That’s something you’ve undoubtedly heard before. One of those hillbilly singers came up to me and asked, ‘what are you on, man?’ I said, ‘what are you on, man?’ he said. And he addressed me as ‘Decca.’ Aw, shucks, shucks! I believe he was under the influence of some sort of narcotic. I really don’t know. However, he was aware of the musicians that he wished to have appear on the albums. Everything he did was excellent, and he did everything very well.”
  • Supergroup The Firm covered the song on their self-titled album in 1985. Singer Paul Rodgers selected to record a cover version of the song when guitarist Jimmy Page asked him what one song he would like to record from anywhere in the globe. When asked about the song, Rodgers told Uncut magazine, “I’d always questioned if I could sing it since it required two vocalists to get the octaves on it.” “It was a completely out of the box scenario for us.”
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The Righteous Brothers – You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’

You don’t even bother to close your eyes anymore. When I kiss your lips, I’m saying I love you. And there is no longer any tenderness as there was previously. You have everything you need at your fingertips. You’re putting up every effort not to show it (Baby), but baby, baby, I see through it. You’ve lost your lovin’ feeling Whoa, you’ve lost your lovin’ feeling You’ve lost that lovin’ feeling, haven’t you? Now it’s gone, gone, gone, whoa-oh-oh, that was fast. When I reach for you, there’s no longer a welcoming expression in your eyes, and you’ve begun to criticize the little things I do, which makes me want to weep (Baby).

  • You’ve lost your adoration for life.
  • You’ve lost your adoration for life.
  • When it comes to you, darling, I’d drop down on my knees for you if you would only love me the way you used to.
  • So don’t let it slide through your fingers, don’t let it go through your fingers.

It’s gone, gone, gone, and there’s nothing left of it. And I’m at a loss for words, whoa-oh-oh Bring that lovin’ feeling back Whoa, that lovin’ feeling is back! Bring that lovin’ feeling back into your life. Because it’s no longer there.

The Firm – You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling Lyrics

You don’t even bother to close your eyes anymore. When I kiss your lips, I’m saying I love you. And there is no longer any tenderness as there was previously. You have everything you need at your fingertips. You’re making every effort not to show it (baby), but baby, baby, I know it’s there. You’ve lost that lovin’ feeling, haven’t you? Wow, what a lovin’ feeling you have. You’ve lost that ‘lovin’ feeling,” says the MC. Because it has vanished, vanished, vanished, whoa There’s no love in your eyes when I gaze into them.

  • It’s the little things I do that make me want to cry (baby).
  • You’ve lost that lovin’ feeling, haven’t you?
  • You’ve lost that lovin’ feeling, haven’t you?
  • What if you would just love me the way you used to?We had a love, a love, a love that you don’t find every day, and it was ours.
  • Wow, what a lovin’ feeling you have.
  • As long as you don’t take your love away from me, my sweetheart, darling, darling, Bring that lovin’ feeling back into your life.
  • ‘Restore that warm and fuzzy feeling’ Because it’s no longer there.
  • Wow, what a lovin’ feeling you have.
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The Righteous Brothers – You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’

You’ve misplaced your romantic zeal. Screen Gems is the organization that published this article. Columbia – BMI (Basic Media Index) There’s a Woman in this story. Mother Bertha Music is the publisher of this work. BMIPhilles Records is home to Ray Maxwell’s music. Phil Spector Productions is a division of the production company.

  • Matrix / Runout(Side A Etched, Except):BROS-12
  • Matrix / Runout(Side B Etched, Except):BROS-11
  • Rights Society:BMI
  • Matrix / Runout(Side A Etched, Except):BROS-12
  • Matr
Title(Format) Label Cat Country Year
You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'(7″, 45 RPM, Single) London Records,London American Recordings HL-U.9943 UK 1964
New Submission You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'(7″, 45 RPM, Single) London Records,London American Recordings HLU 9943 Ireland 1964
New Submission You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'(7″, Single, 45 RPM) Philles Records PH. 124 Canada 1964
New Submission You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'(7″, 45 RPM, Single,4-Prong Knockout Centre) London Records,London American Recordings HLU 9943 UK 1964
New Submission You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'(7″, 45 RPM, Single) London Records,London American Recordings HL 9943 UK 1964

The Righteous Brothers – You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling / Unchained Melody

Rights Society:BMI; Rights Matrix / Runout(Side A Etched, Except):BROS-12; Rights Matrix / Runout(Side B Etched, Except):BROS-11; Rights Matrix / Runout(Side A Etched, Except):BROS-12; Rights Matrix / Runout(Side B Etched, Except):BROS-11; Rights Matrix / Runout(Side B Etched, Except):BR

  • Rights Society:GEMA
  • Matrix / Runout(Runout Side A):2135 302 S1 3201 B
  • Matrix / Runout(Runout Side B):2135 302 S2 320A 1
  • Matrix / Runout(Runout Side C):2135 302 S2 320A 1
  • Matrix / Runout(Runout Side D):2135 302 S2 320A 1
  • Matrix
Title(Format) Label Cat Country Year
New Submission You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ / Unchained Melody(7″, 45 RPM, Single) London Records,London American Recordings HL 10241 Ireland 1965
New Submission You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ / Unchained Melody(7″, 45 RPM, Single) London American Recordings HL 10241 Ireland 1965
You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ / Unchained Melody(7″, 45 RPM, Single, Reissue) London Records,London American Recordings HL 10241 UK 1969
New Submission You’ve Lost That Loving Feeling / Unchained Melody(7″, 45 RPM, Reissue, Single, Mono) Pink Elephant PE 22.010 Netherlands 1969
New Submission You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ / Unchained Melody(7″, 45 RPM, Single, Promo) London Records,London American Recordings HL 10241 UK 1969
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You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ (Re-Recorded In Stereo) by The Righteous Brothers on Amazon Music – Amazon.com

verified purchaseReviewed in the United States on October 21, 2014Verified Purchase This is not the original; it is a remake of the original. It’s a good piece of music. Compared to the original, this interpretation is a little different. In comparison to the Hall and Oates rendition, this one is certainly superior. Because it is a new recording, it sounds superior than the original in terms of sound quality. The total performance of the original, on the other hand, is five stars, but this is three stars for the remake.

  • On November 6, 2016, a review was published in the United States, and the purchase was verified.
  • It doesn’t get much better than this one, really.
  • It was reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2013 and the purchase was verified.
  • It’s clear that these people and their music have stood the test of time.
  • ahhhh, such a flood of memories.
  • It sounds terrible, and I had to go out and purchase the original recording in order to get that awful sound out of my ears.

The Righteous Brothers have long been a favorite of mine. They certainly know how to perform a song well. Thank you for making it possible for me to purchase their songs through your website. verified purchase reviewed in the United States on October 1, 2014Verified Purchase

You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’, Produced By Phil Spector, Named To National Recording Registry – The Official Phil Spector Site

It is one of 25 recordings selected this year to be inducted into the National Recording Registry, which is housed at the Library of Congress. The Righteous Brothers’ 1964 single, “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’,” produced by Phil Spector, is one of the 25 recordings selected this year to be inducted into the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry. According to the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian of Congress picks 25 recordings each year that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically important” and have been in existence for at least ten years.

  1. Spector, who had recently signed The Righteous Brothers (Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield) to his Philles label, approached the husband and wife team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil and asked them to write a song for them.
  2. They were inspired by the longing of The Four Tops’ “Baby, I Need Your Loving,” and they presented their first draft to Spector, who offered a riff from “Hang on Sloopy” for the bridge, which they liked, and added the vocal “whoa-whoa-whoas,” which they didn’t like.
  3. As part of the recording session at Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles, Spector jammed a large number of musicians into a small space known as Studio A.
  4. According to engineer Larry Levine, the microphone leakage that resulted as a result of the effect led to the Wall of Sound.
  5. The resulting 45-rpm mono masterpiece was mixed and mastered by a master mixer.

You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ / There’s a Woman by The Righteous Brothers – RYM/Sonemic

Is it true that anysong takes less time to completely immerse you in its small world? Even the first thrums of Bill Medley’s monosyllabic shot across the bow– a practically subliminal execution of the word 34;you,34; its baritone more of a ghost in the low brass than a human voice– are a faster and sweeter numbing agent than perhaps any other in music. 34;You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’34; is a slow, inky-blue spiralling that takes maybe two seconds to submerge The first second is sung a cappella and contains the phrase 34;you never know.

Akin to being in a place that is both familiar and foreign at the same time, a cosmos with its own set of laws and a unique concept of reality.

The opening verse of 34;You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’34; is sparse, muted, and ethereal, and it captures the ambiance and tension of the song, as well as the languor and panic of sexual desperation as shown in a dyelike dream.

A route through the trees leading to anything magnificent will almost certainly be cut over by you no matter where it leads.

Published Despite the fact that Phil Spector’s cooperation with The Righteous Brothers was limited, the result was some very wonderful music.

Spector met them in 1964 and signed them immediately, releasing this album the following year.

Spector put in a lot of time and work into this one, which cost $35,000 to produce, which was a significant figure at the time.

It should be noted that, aside from the Brothers themselves, this one had a tremendous amount of skill behind it.

I think it’s just fantastic.

It’s all dripping with soul.

It is quite effective.

A lot of subtlety goes into the instrumentation as it builds to that gorgeous chorus, with gentle strings and that charming steady tambourine, and ethereal bits of guitar and piano interspersed throughout.

A wonderful, haunting, and emotionally charged work of art.

This song is more comparable to what the RBs were performing before to Lovin’ Feelin’ – it is more upbeat and upbeat.

To be really honest, this one is excellent!

Weeks spent at No.

Published There have been a plethora of songs written and sung about the end of a relationship, and there will be many more in the coming years.

An undeniably one-sided account from the inside of a love affair’s dissolution, set in motion by one of the most memorable opening lines in the history of popular music.

Spector creates the most terrifying of environments for Medley to slowly, agonizingly, and inexplicably reveal his torment to himself, as if only by speaking his doubts aloud will he be able to believe what is happening to him.

I’m sorry to break it to you, Bill, but she’s not coming back, despite your best efforts.

While relistening to some of the greatest hit singles of the 1960s, it becomes clear that some of them have lost some of their previous enchantment.

This single is a member of the latter category.

What Phil Spector may lack in “street cred” these days, his enormous wall of sound has given us many wonderful songs, and this is one among them.

Although it is not nearly as amazing as “Unchained Melody,” it is still well worth a 5 out of 5 star rating in my opinion.

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