The Healing Power of Yoga After a Stroke

The Healing Power of Yoga After a Stroke

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Gale-Ann Maier began practicing yoga after a stroke and found restoration in her strength and stability.

As I anxiously walked into my first Kripalu yoga session in September 2011, I had no idea what a positive influence yoga would have on my life. As a middle-aged lady who is overweight and has limited left arm use as a result of a stroke that occurred 26 years ago, I was hoped to simply complete the course. It was impossible to predict that the following 90 minutes of the basic Kripalu session would mark the beginning of a wonderful and inspirational trip that would continue to unfold with each passing day.

I was able to sense the prana, which was incredible.

  • In 1978, when I was 18 years old, my life had unfolded just as I’d hoped: blissfully married with an 8-month-old baby, Nathan, to adore and cherish.
  • An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in my brain was discovered, and it was determined that it was too big to be operated on.
  • It seemed like I was walking around with a bomb in my head.
  • See alsoDoes Yoga Increase the Risk of Stroke?
  • I became easily weary and had to rely on my husband and other family members to get me through each day, which was difficult.
  • Over the following 10 years, I made significant progress toward regaining my left side, and I am now able to use my left hand for writing, eating, and driving (yes, I am left-handed), among other things.
  • After learning about a novel radiation therapy for AVMs, I leaped at the chance to participate.

Ultimately, the procedure was effective, and the AVM in my brain was successfully closed off.

My elation was short-lived as I began to lose function in my left side of the body for the second time.

I was no longer at risk of suffering a brain hemorrhage, but I was left with a sense of being only half-functional once more.

My second son, Mackenzie, was born in 1993, after many years of attempting to conceive him.

While life was stressful, I was just grateful to be alive and to be seeing the growth of my children.

My introduction to yoga came about as a result of a trip and break of my one decent right ankle in 2007.

It was yet another disappointment, frustration, and defeat for the team.

With the ankle injury, I quickly recognized how much I was putting on my right side and how little I was giving it.

Several months after having two ankle operations, I began doing deep-water aerobics and practicing restorative yoga.

Yoga for Stroke Survivors is another option.

While I was aware of the existence of other varieties of yoga, I believed that restorative yoga was the only sort that someone with my restrictions could do.

In addition to guiding the class through postures, Nancy did it in a way that did not make me feel excluded or singled out, which was really nice.

After several months of practicing balancing and weight-bearing poses, I’ve developed stability and strength where there was previously none, and I’m continuing to gain greater function on my left side.

Is it possible for me to regain complete function on my left side?

“Never” is not an option for me, and I prefer to continue to develop and expand while exploring what the universe has in store for me.

I’m more present and aware than I’ve ever been before.

It was a restorative class that kindled the fire in the first place, and I continue to practice it once a week.

Since starting yoga, I’ve seen a shift in my connection with food as well as my ability to confront concerns.

Measuring my progress, I have become more conscious in all parts of my life; I am physically stronger; my body form is changing; and where I once saw limitations, I now see potential.

For me, the link between the body, the intellect, and the soul has been astounding.

See also Yoga Can Be Beneficial to Stroke Patients. a little about our authorGale- Ann Maier resides in the Canadian province of British Columbia. She is appreciative to her spouse and two children who constantly encouraged her to keep going.

The Healing Power Of Yoga After A Stroke! – By Dr. Hiren Raval

Yoga is a spiritual practice that incorporates both mental and physical disciplines that first appeared on Indian soil and later divided into various schools, but the actual fragrance of yoga remained the same throughout time. Yoga is a spiritual practice that incorporates both mental and physical disciplines. Yoga is receiving a whole new lease of life these days, thanks to a growing number of studies and researchers on diverse pre-Vedic traditions that are shedding a whole new light on the practice.

  1. What to Expect After a Stroke: The majority of stroke survivors experience long-term disability as a result of their injuries. An example is the fact that when section of the brain does not receive an adequate supply of Blood containing Oxygen, a stroke can occur as result. Moreover, a blockage in an artery may impair the flow of oxygen and nutrients into the brain. In a similar vein, the long-term consequences of a stroke are totally dependent on whatever portion of the brain has been injured. As a result, a stroke may result in the inability to speak normally or to move steadily with the arms and legs. It is for this reason that, following a stroke, one seeks rehabilitation with the goal of overcoming life-long difficulties. The rehabilitation procedure consists of a number of activities that are mostly focused on motions and physiotherapy. It is true that occasionally therapists’ efforts produce fruit and that other times they are in vain
  2. Yoga Has the Potential to Heal: Yoga, which comprises of postures, breathing exercises, and meditation, has been recommended for inclusion in stroke therapy, according to new study from Indianapolis. In this study, 47 male stroke survivors were separated into two groups, with one group participating in yoga sessions for eight weeks and the other not participating in yoga sessions. The results of the eight-week study revealed that individuals who participated in yoga sessions were able to effectively finish the rehabilitation program in a significantly shorter amount of time. Exercise, such as yoga, increases your chances of recovering quickly: In addition to increasing balance, according to the researchers, yoga also has the additional benefit of boosting quality of life and reducing the fear of falling, which is a significant benefit. If you or a member of your family has survived a stroke, yoga is not the first step you should take. Instead, according to the experts, you should begin with a rehabilitation program and then include the practice of yoga into your routine. However, before you add yoga to your to-do list, you should talk with your doctor to see whether the practice is appropriate for you. Yoga Helps You Develop A Way Of Life: In conclusion, it may be stated that the goal of recovering after a stroke is essentially to avoid a second attack from occurring. As a result, you must maintain a healthy lifestyle free of habits such as smoking and drinking, which are detrimental to your health. After all, yoga promotes a more elevated way of thinking, which will aid you in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

When faced with an issue or question, you may always seek advice from an expert and receive answers to your queries! This was beneficial to 6222 individuals.

5 Huge Benefits of Yoga for Stroke Patients (& How to Get Started)

Yogic practices have been shown to have considerable advantages for stroke patients, particularly in terms of improved mobility and independence. These advantages are about to be revealed to you. Following that, you’ll hear how a yoga instructor utilized this technique to accelerate her rehabilitation after suffering a stroke. We hope it serves as an inspiration for you to begin a safe yoga practice to assist in your rehabilitation.

Yoga Is About More than Cool-Looking Poses

First and first, let’s define who is permitted to practice yoga. The ability to be flexible, as well as having excellent posture or balance, are not prerequisites for practicing yoga. (Hint: it’s not only for the bendy.) There’s a lot more to it than just striking a cool-looking position. In reality, yoga poses are only a minor portion of the whole practice. Yoga is a combination of postures, meditation, breathing, and observation skills, among other things. Developing your mind-body connection may be extremely beneficial to your stroke recovery.

As the brain rewires itself, it enhances communication between the brain and the body (i.e., your “mind-body connection.”).

Consider the following video, which shows a basic yoga stance that has been modified for stroke patients:The simplicity of the yoga practice allows stroke patients to receive a variety of advantages.

Benefits of Yoga for Stroke Patients

We’ll be sharing a success story on yoga and stroke healing in the near future. But first and foremost, you must comprehend why yoga is beneficial. The following are some of the most significant advantages of yoga for stroke patients:

1. Improves Mind-Body Connection

Yoga is beneficial for stroke healing because of the high concentration and attention required throughout the practice. Each action is purposeful and deliberate in its pace.

Even if you are unable to complete the action precisely, the stimulus will aid in the development of your mind-body connection. Intense physical activity is beneficial to the rewiring process of neuroplasticity, especially if it is repeated over time.

2. Improves Balance, Range of Motion, and Strength

Thirty-seven stroke patients engaged in yoga twice a week for eight weeks in a research conducted in 2014. By the conclusion of the study, patients reported less discomfort, increased neck range of motion, increased passive hip range of motion, increased upper extremity strength, and increased endurance. These are all significant advantages. While participating in the study, patients were guided through a yoga practice that included postures, breathing, meditation, and relaxation while sitting, standing, or lying down on the floor.

Even seemingly insignificant aspects, such as meditation, can have a significant impact.Read more about meditation for stroke victims »

3. Improves Walking and Balance

Thirty-seven stroke patients engaged in yoga twice a week for eight weeks in a research conducted in 2014 By the conclusion of the study, patients reported decreased discomfort, increased neck range of motion, increased passive hip range of motion, increased upper extremity strength, and increased endurance. These were all significant advantages for the patients included. While participating in the study, patients were guided through a yoga practice that included postures, breathing, meditation, and relaxation while sitting, standing, or lying down on the floor.

Even seemingly insignificant aspects, such as meditation, can have a significant impact.Read more about meditation for stroke victims here.

4. Accessible for All Stroke Patients

Yoga is especially beneficial for stroke patients due to the fact that it can be customized to nearly any stage of rehabilitation. The practice of meditation and mental practice can be beneficial even if you suffer post-stroke paralysis. These techniques do not necessitate any physical activity; you may complete them while lying in bed. During your rehabilitation from post-stroke paralysis, it is possible that you will regain some mobility. From there, you can experiment with chair yoga or supports (such as foam blocks) to help you maintain your postures.

Even if your stroke was more cognitive in nature than physical in nature, yoga may still be able to aid you in your rehabilitation by strengthening your cognitive abilities.

Yoga is a kind of exercise that can be done anywhere.

Practicing yoga with survivors of an occipital lobe stroke, who may have suffered visual impairments as a result of the stroke, might give a chance to urge patients to use newly learnt compensatory skills.

Yoga is an excellent tool for aiding in the rehabilitation from a stroke in a variety of ways.

5. Reminds You to Breathe While You Exercise

Breathing is critical for all types of activities, but it is especially critical during rehabilitation exercises. However, when stroke patients have difficulty moving about, they may unconsciously hold their breath without even realizing it. There is less oxygen accessible to the body and brain as a result, which is bad news – especially during recovery. Yoga, on the other hand, focuses a strong emphasis on connecting breath to movement. Take a deep breath and move in one direction. Take a deep breath and proceed in a different direction.

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As you can see, there are several advantages to practicing yoga for stroke victims.

How a Stroke Survivor and Yoga Teacher Boosted Her Recovery

Isabelle, a 51-year-old yoga instructor, suffered a stroke, yet she recovered in an astonishingly short period of time. Despite the fact that it took her three months to make a full recovery, she attributes this to her previous yoga practice. She specifically said that her breath/movement connection as well as her mental practice were really beneficial. In order to overcome post-stroke paralysis or to increase mobility in general, mental practice can be used as a prehabilitation approach. It was Isabelle’s mental practice that comprised envisioning herself performing various yoga postures.

And with each passing day, Isabelle observed that she was getting a bit better at the posture.

In order to aid in stroke rehabilitation, both mental practice and yoga are beneficial since they both assist to restructure the brain.

It’s possible that Isabelle suffered a small to moderate stroke, which resulted in secondary effects that were more quickly resolved than those experienced by others.

Start Your Yoga Practice for Stroke Recovery

Yoga has a variety of benefits for those recovering from a stroke. We propose that you investigate the possibility of beginning your yoga practice as soon as feasible. Examine the internet to see whether there are any yoga therapists available in your region. Then give them a call to check if they have any previous expertise working with stroke survivors on their case. Keep yourself safe and enjoy yourself!

Stroke Patients and the Healing Power of Yoga • Yoga Basics

In 2010, Sher Breen, a licensed yoga instructor and therapist, began working with Billy Anderson*, a stroke patient who had suffered brain damage. Billy had had a stroke three years prior. After suffering a stroke, he was confined to a wheelchair and unable to utilize his right side of his body for several months. He spent the majority of his time hunched over in his wheelchair, and he only participated in sporadic physical therapy sessions. When he was exposed to yoga, it completely transformed his life.

  • These minor links resulted in huge shifts in a short period of time.
  • He gradually gained the ability to move more freely as time passed.
  • Breen’s sessions included the use of yoga blocks and straps, as well as mantra meditation and relaxation techniques.
  • Anderson was hesitant to commit and much more hesitant to be optimistic in the beginning.
  • “At the time, it felt like it was just something fresh the group could do,” Anderson stated.
  • He is now able to move his left arm and leg, as well as extend them.
  • I’ve found that it has improved my capacity to cope with this (brain damage).” Anderson, according to Breen, is now entirely linked to his body and is able to move into various stances.

“He has a bad habit of sitting on his chair with his back rounded, but his posture has improved dramatically.” He still has days when he is down, but when he reflects about it, he is able to pull himself back.” Anderson’s story is one of several that have emerged from a growing body of research that has documented the numerous health advantages of yoga practice.

  1. It has also been shown to help alleviate symptoms associated with cancer, asthma and diabetic neuropathy to reducing the symptoms of drug addiction and high blood pressure, as well as heart disease and high blood pressure.
  2. But at the heart of it all is the relationship between the mind and the body.
  3. We are all going through the same thing: the human experience.
  4. Teachers and practitioners of yoga both find it difficult to define how this ancient practice promotes healing, but Breen is confident that a large part of it has to do with surrendering to non-doing and objectives, as well as just experiencing being in the moment.
  5. The practice of prana kundalini cannot be quantified, but when we are fully immersed in it, we are bringing healing to a whole new level.

He has embraced the practice of yoga and believes in its ability to cure both the mind and the body. In his own words, “I wish it had been something I had begun much earlier.” *Name has been modified to protect privacy.

Benefits of Yoga for Stroke Recovery

A stroke is the fifth largest cause of mortality and the top cause of disability in the United States, according to the American Stroke Association (ASA). While some people recover entirely after a stroke, over two-thirds of those who have had a stroke continue to have physical limitations. After a stroke, the purpose of physical and occupational therapy is to assist patients in coping with the physical challenges that have arisen, with the intention of helping them to recover to their previous level of functioning.

How a Stroke Affects Physical Functioning

In essence, a stroke is a “brain assault,” in that it follows a similar procedure to a heart attack in terms of symptoms. It happens when blood supply to the brain is interrupted, either by a clot or by a rupture of an artery, resulting in brain death. When the blood supply to the brain is interrupted, brain cells are deprived of oxygen and nutrients, and they begin to die. In the event that brain cells die, some processes such as memory and motor control are impaired, and in some cases completely lost.

Types of Stroke

The physical consequences of a stroke are determined by the site of the stroke and the degree of brain damage that has occurred. A clot is responsible for around 87 percent of all strokes, which occur when blood flow is blocked. This is referred to as an Ischemic Stroke. A Hemorrhagic Stroke happens when a blood artery ruptures and causes blood to clot in the brain tissue around the ruptured vessel. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is a common cause of this type of stroke in the elderly. It is common for strokes to be localized to one side of the body whether they are caused by ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes.

It is possible to suffer from a stroke and have just mild physical impairments, such as minimal memory loss or a little limp, or more major physical impairments, such as paralysis or loss of capacity to speak.

Minimizing Long-Term Disability

One of the objectives of therapy is to reduce the long-term impairment induced by a stroke to the greatest extent possible. Physical therapists use a variety of methods and tactics to help their patients gain strength, balance, and mobility. Workplace techniques are provided by occupational therapists to help people manage the activities of daily living that may have been disrupted by a stroke. These activities include home chores, personal hygiene, and working.

The Benefits of Yoga

Yoga, according to research, can help to increase the effectiveness of therapy. Individuals who practice yoga may benefit from increased flexibility, improved balance, increased strength, a larger range of motion in the neck and hip, reduced discomfort, and increased energy levels, to name just a few benefits.

As an added benefit, because yoga involves great concentration, it helps to increase neuroplasticity, which is the brain’s ability to restructure itself and build new connections. In this way, damage produced by a stroke can be repaired or compensated for by the brain.

What Is Yoga?

Yoga is a mix of physical and mental activities that have been practiced since ancient India’s earliest civilizations. The practice of yoga, it is claimed, not only improves physical well-being, but also adds to mental and spiritual well-being. In order to attain this objective, a mix of postures, breathing exercises, and meditations are usually employed in conjunction with one another. Traditional yoga courses consist of a range of floor exercises performed on a yoga mat, which may include both sitting and standing positions, as well as meditation.

In these workshops, students are taught postures that may be performed while laying on a bench or sitting in a chair, or while using a cane, walker, or wheelchair to provide support for themselves and their bodies.

It is critical to contact with your doctor or therapist before participating in a yoga session to verify that it is appropriate for treating your specific impairments.

The Results Speak for Themselves

According to new study, incorporating yoga into stroke rehabilitation treatment can help patients recover more quickly and completely. Also discovered to enhance quality of life, reduce fear of falling, and boost independence with daily living tasks are the benefits of acupuncture. Apart from enhancing balance and flexibility, yoga has also been demonstrated to result in a stronger and quicker gait, as well as longer steps and an improvement in strength and endurance, among other benefits. In addition, yoga emphasizes the necessity of connecting one’s breath to one’s activity, which increases the overall effectiveness of rehabilitation.

Remember…

In order to lessen the likelihood of having another stroke:

  • Put an end to your smoking
  • Maintain a close eye on your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Maintain a balanced nutritional intake
  • Check to see if the prescriptions supplied to you are the correct ones.

All of us here at Saebo are dedicated to providing stroke survivors and their families with support and rehabilitation. In addition to offering a comprehensive range of products that integrate cutting-edge technology with evidence-based rehabilitation approaches, Saebooffers also provides a variety of services. Our products and services, as well as our network of Saebo-trained therapists, can assist you or a loved one in obtaining all of the tools essential to enhance stroke recovery. All content on this site is offered solely for informative reasons and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a licensed healthcare provider.

You should contact your doctor or 911 as soon as you suspect you are experiencing a medical emergency. It is exclusively at your own risk that you rely on any information obtained from the Saebo website.

Yoga Can Help Stroke Survivors Regain Their Balance

Getty Images is the source of this image. If you want to get the advantages of the cobra stance, you don’t have to be a dedicated yogi. A recent study in chronic stroke survivors demonstrates that practicing yoga helps enhance balance in patients, allowing them to feel more confident in their ability to conduct day-to-day tasks and perhaps lowering impairment. The study, which was published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke, included 47 stroke survivors, the majority of whom were male veterans, who had suffered a stroke six months before taking part in it.

  • Difficulties with balance might increase the likelihood of falling, sustaining severe harm, and being permanently disabled.
  • All of the participants had to be able to stand on their own in order to be eligible for the research.
  • (FURTHER READING: Does Yoga Really Make People Thrive with Desire?) Natural healing and concentrated rehabilitation therapy, according to the study’s authors, often stop approximately six months after a stroke, although individuals may continue to be impaired after that time.
  • Arlene Schmid, lead study author and rehabilitation research scientist at Roudebush Veterans Administration–Medical Center in Indianapolis, stated in a statement that improvements take longer to manifest after the six-month window.
  • Indeed, according to the findings of the pilot study, even patients who had suffered considerable paralysis as a result of a stroke were able to do modified yoga postures.
  • Initially, the patients practiced easy rotational maneuvers on the mat, such as pigeon posture, before progressing to more difficult poses that required standing, such as chair pose.
  • When compared to patients in the control group, individuals in the yoga and yoga plus groups had improved their balance at the conclusion of the eight-week study on tests such as standing, standing with their eyes closed, standing with their feet together, and turning around 360 degrees.
  • According to the researchers, they also saw improvements in the patients’ mental state.
  • (FURTHER READING: Yoga and Stretching Can Help Relieve Back Pain) Neither the study’s authors nor the participants were surprised to learn that yoga practice was related with both psychological and physical advantages.
  • Schmid of her experience with the practice.

They were able to employ relaxation techniques such as breathing and meditation to assist reduce tension.” Previous study has demonstrated that yoga can provide treatment from a wide range of medical conditions by doing precisely that, by reducing stress in both the mind and the body: Yoga has been shown to aid in the recovery of teenagers from eating disorders, as well as the reduction of sadness, anxiety, and irregular heartbeat in heart patients, the alleviation of chronic back pain, and even the increase in success rates in in vitro fertilization.

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Heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, arterial stiffening, and inflammation are all reduced when people practice yoga on a regular basis, according to research.

MORE: What’s the Deal with ‘Baby Yoga’? The Story Behind the Viral Video

Yoga Improves Balance After Stroke

26th of July, 2012 – Starting yoga even years after a stroke can help stroke survivors regain their balance, according to a new research. According to study researcher Arlene Schmid, PhD, “it’s a really exciting thing.” “People can regain their equilibrium even years after suffering a stroke. They have the ability to alter their intellect as well as their physique. They are not confined to their current situation.” The findings of the study were reported in the journal Stroke. The Roudebush Veterans Administration-Medical Center and Indiana University in Indianapolis collaborate on rehabilitation research, with Schmid serving as a rehabilitation research scientist.

  1. 75 percent of them were veterans, including soldiers of World War II, and the majority of them were white.
  2. Ten people did not get any treatment.
  3. Many of the veterans were skeptical about the therapy at first.
  4. “This is the answer of an archetypal male veteran.” After a couple of sessions, and with encouragement from their spouses, the veterans learned to embrace yoga and the positive influence it had on their impairments, and they continued to practice.
  5. During the eight-week research period, they did sitting, standing, and floor-based activities such as the pigeon posture and the mountain pose, among other things.
  6. Their confidence was also enhanced, and their fear of falling was lessened, as a result of their yoga practice.
  7. Falls of this nature can result in broken bones.
  8. Strokes can cause physical suffering as well as psychological impairment, including depression.

Stroke Survivor’s Recovery Is Ongoing Years After Stroke

The findings of this study provide critical information on the capacity of stroke survivors to recover significantly during their first year following their stroke. When patients are told that gains achieved during the first three to six months of treatment are the end of their recovery, Andrea Serdar, PT, NCS (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine), who evaluated the study for WebMD, becomes “very worried.” This is the old way of thinking, not the new science, says the author.

In her clinical practice, she observes comparable beneficial outcomes to those described in the research among long-term stroke survivors.

Serdar believes that participation in complex, gradually taxing activities like as yoga and Pilates can help the brain and body recover from stroke.

According to her, “the interaction of the class is quite useful.” “There’s a genuine sense of togetherness. The common experiences cause them to bond quickly, and the advantages of exercising are the same no matter what they choose to do.”

More Yoga Therapists Needed

In order to validate the benefits of yoga, according to Schmid, further research must be conducted. Her other point of contention is that yoga treatment is not widely available at the present time. “I used to live in Hawaii, which had a lot of yoga,” she explains. “It’s a little more difficult to come by here in the Midwest.” Despite this, she claims, therapists are warming up to the concept of incorporating yoga into their professional practice. She claims that there is a lot of conversation going on among them about how to legitimize the practice of acupuncture.

However, he is impressed with the findings and would consider prescribing yoga to patients who have access to a qualified therapist on an informal basis.

He was not a part of the study team in any way.

8 Ways to Ease Stroke Recovery

The road to recovery from a stroke is both physically and emotionally demanding. These cutting-edge concepts can be used in conjunction with standard rehab treatment.

Approaches That Offer Care After Stroke

Experts estimate that just 10 percent of the almost seven million Americans who have a stroke will make a full recovery, according to their estimates. “The majority of individuals recover, however the extent of recovery varies from person to person. Approximately 15 to 20% of the population suffers from a long-term handicap “Dr. Andrew Russman, a neurologist and stroke care specialist at the Cleveland Clinic, shared his thoughts on the subject. At the early stages of treatment, hospitalization may be followed by physical therapy in a rehabilitation facility.

Practice Yoga for Stroke Recovery

Approximately ten percent of the almost seven million Americans who have a stroke will make a full recovery, according to estimates from medical experts. “Everyone recovers to a varying degree, but no one recovers the same amount that someone else does. People with long-term disabilities account for 15 to 20 percent of the population “Cleveland Clinic neurologist and stroke care expert Andrew Russman, DO, shared his thoughts on the subject. At the early stages of treatment, hospitalization may be followed by physical therapy in a rehab center.

Get Care After Stroke With Hand Therapy

According to a research presented at the American Stroke Association International Conference, Japanese hand treatment, which includes hand washing in warm water and discussion, may aid in the rehabilitation of stroke victims after a stroke. Twenty-three patients who received hand bathing four times a week were compared to twenty-one patients who did not get hand bathing. Hand washing resulted in enhanced hand mobility, more pleasant discourse, and an overall increased sense of well-being among the study participants.

“Don’t underestimate the importance of physical contact. Any activity that interests the patient and fosters contact is likely to be beneficial to stroke patients, according to research “Dr. Russman expresses his thoughts on the subject.

Listening to Music Fights Depression During Stroke Recovery

A research conducted in Finland examined the benefits of listening to music with listening to audio books on the rehabilitation of 60 patients who had suffered a stroke. Patients who participated in the music group reported decreased despair, better relaxation, and an enhanced mood as a result of their participation. “Depression and social isolation are significant hazards for people recovering from a stroke. Recovery after a stroke may be a lengthy and arduous process. Healing is improved by any activity that aids in the battle against depression because patients are more likely to be hopeful and to participate fully in the recovery process when they are engaged in such activities “Russman expressed his thoughts on the subject.

Walk 6,000 Steps for Stroke Recovery

When 60 persons were recovering from a stroke, a research conducted in Finland evaluated the benefits of listening to music versus listening to audiobooks. Less despair, better relaxation, and increased mood were reported by patients in the music group. “When it comes to stroke rehabilitation, depression and social isolation are major concerns for patients. Recovering after a stroke may be a time-consuming and challenging endeavor. Anything that helps patients combat depression helps them recover more quickly because they are more likely to remain positive and fully participate in the healing process when they are actively engaged in depression-fighting activities “Mr.

Try Art Therapy for Recovery After Stroke

A research conducted in Finland examined the benefits of listening to music with listening to audio books on the rehabilitation of 60 persons who had just suffered a stroke. Patients who participated in the music group reported decreased despair, better relaxation, and an improved overall mood. “Depression and social isolation are significant hazards for people recovering from stroke. Recovery after a stroke may be a lengthy and arduous process. Healing is enhanced by any activity that aids in the battle against depression because patients are more likely to feel hopeful and to participate fully in the recovery process when they are engaged in such activities “Russman expressed himself as follows:

Involve Family Members for Better Stroke Recovery

The rehabilitation after a stroke has an impact on the entire family. When family members and stroke patients talk and collaborate, it can help the patient recover more quickly after his or her stroke. In a study published in Stroke, researchers compared the outcomes of 20 stroke patients who engaged in an exercise program that involved family members to the outcomes of 20 stroke patients who participated alone. The family group reported greater mobility, better balance, a longer walking distance, and an enhanced capacity to carry out daily tasks as a result of the intervention.

Consider Acupuncture as Part of Stroke Recovery

Acupuncture is extensively used in China and Japan to alleviate symptoms of stroke recovery such as muscular weakness, speech difficulties, and even depression. In these countries, this ancient treatment is considered standard care. An increase in blood circulation in the brain may be the mechanism through which acupuncture works.

A normal treatment schedule may include three sessions per week for up to one month, with a maximum of three sessions per week. Acupuncture is generally regarded to be a safe treatment for stroke victims, but you should always see your doctor before beginning any new treatments.

Join a Recovery Support Group for Care After Stroke

As a result of sharing their stroke recovery experiences, people may learn from one other and give each other with encouragement and support. Find a stroke recovery support group to connect with people who have been through the same thing. “All of these methods of assisting stroke recovery have one thing in common: they are all non-invasive. They are all more attentive to the patient who is recovering from a stroke. When patients recovering from a stroke feel cared for, they work harder and have a stronger sense of self-worth.

Huge, Surprising Benefits of Yoga for Stroke Recovery

Written by Yassmine ElSayed CAIRO, Egypt, March 27 (SEE) – Egypt’s president, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, has called for the abolition of the death penalty. Recent studies have revealed that yoga can be quite beneficial in the rehabilitation from a stroke. ‘SEE’ gives you with 5 of these benefits in this article, which you may find surprising. But first and foremost, it is necessary to define yoga, as the majority of people have a misunderstanding of what Yoga is actually about. Yoga is about much more than just striking a position that looks good on Instagram.

A news report released by ‘Flint Rehab’ describes yoga as a blend of postures, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques that may be practiced by anybody.

The following are five advantages of yoga for stroke recovery: Yoga is beneficial for stroke healing because of the high concentration and attention required throughout the practice.

“Yes, we’re on the go!” exclaims your brain as it receives an extra push.

  1. Yoga can help stroke survivors with their balance, range of motion, strength, and endurance by doing the following:

In a 2014 research, 37 stroke patients participated in yoga twice a week for eight weeks, as part of a rehabilitation program. Stroke survivors saw significant improvements in their pain, neck range of motion and passive hip range of motion, upper extremity strength and endurance by the conclusion of the eight-week study. Modify all of your yoga postures to fit your current level of skill to increase your safety (more on this later). In addition, be sure to practice with a caregiver present or with the assistance of a therapist.

The mobility challenges that stroke patients experience frequently result in balance problems and shaky gait (your manner of walking).

Longer steps and increased coordination resulted in an improvement in the quality of their gait.

If you wish to enhance your mobility, balance, and gait, we urge that you incorporate yoga into your rehabilitation as soon as possible — under the supervision and care of a trained professional.

Yoga is also beneficial for stroke recovery due to the fact that it can be customized to nearly any stage of rehabilitation. It is possible to begin with meditation and mental practice even if you are completely paralyzed. Starting with chair yoga or utilizing props to help your postures may be a good option if you have some mobility issues to begin with.

  1. Yoga assists you in remembering to take a breath after each exercise session:

We’re all aware that breathing is beneficial, especially while we’re working out. This is self-evident. Holding one’s breath while exercising is a common unintended error made by stroke sufferers after their recovery. It is possible that you will instinctively hold your breath while performing your rehabilitation exercises because movement will need so much more work than previously. Yoga, on the other hand, focuses a strong emphasis on connecting breath to movement. Take a deep breath and move in one direction.

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Because of the increased attention on your breath, you’ll be more likely to remember to breathe while in rehab — and even when going about your normal activities!

The healing power of yoga

It happened so quickly that it appeared as though it had never happened at all. Barbara Newborn was getting ready for supper when the recording started. Next thing she knew, she was rushing into the ground with falling face first, banging her skull against the floor. The occurrence was determined to be a stroke, which is highly uncommon for someone her age. She was paralyzed on the right side of her body after a clogged blood artery cut off oxygen to her brain, damaging cells that would never be restored and causing her to lose consciousness.

  1. She was twenty-one years old.
  2. “I couldn’t communicate with anyone since I couldn’t comprehend them.
  3. It also had an impact on the rest of her life.
  4. She trained using flash cards and remembered spelling terms in order to regain her language abilities after a period of absence.
  5. Following her graduation, she went on to acquire two master’s degrees, built a camp in New Mexico for head trauma patients, developed programs for young people who had suffered traumatic brain injuries, and worked as a rehabilitation counselor.
  6. During the ten years it took her to recuperate, Newborn discovered yoga, which she has been practicing ever since.
  7. She was certain that the physical difficulties, as well as the emphasis on breathing and relaxation, would help stroke sufferers better their spirits, minds, and bodies.

After a number of years, she began building tailored programs for her clients based on their disability and personal situations.

In a recent session at Gardens of Yoga, which is located in Newborn’s Ballast Point house and studio, she guided students through a sequence of breathing exercises and relaxing positions.

You have intelligence stored within your body.

Along with the pentas, lantanas, and beach daisies, you’ll find tall grasses and an abundance of pink bougainvillea flowers.

Three rotund cats laze in the sunshine, their bodies so mellowed by years of rest that they lay on their backs with their bellies protruding into the air.

Her customers have physical limitations in around 70% of cases.

It is her opinion that, through yoga, one may learn to be healthy again, spiritually and psychologically, “and it is at this point that one begins to recover physically.” Newborn, now 51, is so convinced that yoga can transform people’s lives that she has put her professional future on it.

Despite the fact that Newborn had been teaching yoga for years, it had always been a second career for her, and she had never relied on the revenue for her livelihood.

She and her husband, Nenov, who has now abandoned his work to devote his time exclusively to teaching yoga, now conduct lessons seven days a week in their house and at other places across Tampa.

Candy Federico and her husband, Simon, began attending Newborn’s yoga lessons approximately six weeks ago and haven’t looked back since.

In an attempt to alleviate their persisting neck and back discomfort, both had attempted standard physical therapy as well as massage treatment.

“While in physical therapy, I was pushed and tugged, but no one ever taught me how to breathe properly.

Because many of my customers rely on my seminars to help them relax, Newborn creates audio records that they may listen to when he is away from the office.

When there is stress and strain, it is impossible to be joyful.” Barbara Newborn is a writer who lives in New York City.

Gardens of Yoga, Yogani, and Ballast Point Fitness and Wellness Center all have yoga studios.

FAMILY: Antonin Nenov is married to Bhati, Shiva, and Yami, and they have three cats. Gardening is a great passion of mine. Peppermint, chamomile, and ginseng are some of my favorite teas. A.G. Mohan and T.K.V. Desikachar are yoga instructors. BARBER NEWBORN’S WEB SITE: barbnewbornyahoo.com

“These 7 Simple Yoga Stretches Got Me Walking Again After A Stroke”

I swear it happened so quickly that it was almost as if it had never happened at all. Barbara Newborn was getting ready for supper when the recording started playing. It wasn’t long after that before she was rushing forward face first, her head striking the ground. It was determined that she had suffered a stroke, which was highly unusual for someone her age to have. She was rendered paralyzed on the right side of her body after a clogged blood artery cut off oxygen to her brain, damaging cells that would never be restored and causing her to lose consciousness.

  1. At the time, she was twenty-one years old, and In her own words, “I walked into this weird world all alone.” “Everyone and everything seemed incomprehensible to me.
  2. It also had a lasting impact on the remainder of her existence.
  3. She used flash cards to drill and recall spelling words in order to regain her linguistic abilities.
  4. Following her graduation, she went on to acquire two master’s degrees, built a camp in New Mexico for head trauma patients, developed the first programs for young people with traumatic brain injuries, and worked as a rehabilitation counselor.
  5. Yoga became an obsession for Newborn during the ten years it took her to recover.
  6. She recognized that the physical obstacles, as well as the emphasis on breathing and relaxation, may assist stroke sufferers in improving their spirit, mind, and body after their recovery.
  7. Following years of working with people with various impairments and life circumstances, she began building customized programs for them.

The Gardens of Yoga instructor led students through a series of breathing exercises and gentle positions during a recent class held at her Ballast Point house and studio.

“With each breath you take into that stretch, it gets a little easier.

Be calm and pay attention to what you hear.” An stunning one-acre garden and pool are visible from the studio; this is a project that Newborn and her husband of 11 years, Antonin Nenov, are now working on.

A cold ginseng tea with honey is served to pupils on garden seats before the start of class.

Newborn’s private and group sessions attract a large number of healthy pupils, but she has a loyal following among those who have suffered from serious sickness or accident.

Help with stress reduction and relaxation is required for the remainder.

Newborn is now 51 years old.

In spite of the fact that Newborn had been teaching yoga for years, it had always been a part-time career for her, and she had never relied on the revenue for her daily needs.

She and Nenov, who has now left his work to devote his time exclusively to yoga teaching, now conduct lessons seven days a week in their house as well as at different places across Tampa.

Approximately six weeks ago, Candy Federico and her husband, Simon, enlisted the help of Newborn’s yoga instructor.

In an attempt to alleviate their persisting neck and back discomfort, both had attempted standard physical therapy as well as massage therapy treatments.

As a thank you for attending, Newborn gives them both unexpected hugs and then presents them with a container of Tiger Balm and a handcrafted relaxation tape to keep them occupied until the next class.

“The ability to enjoy the environment is enhanced when one is in a state of relaxation.

-” Barbara Newborn is a woman who was born into a family of ten children.

Gardens of Yoga, Yogani, and Ballast Point Fitness and Wellness Center are some of the studios that provide yoga instruction.

Antonin Nenov’s family consists of his wife, Bhati Nenov, and three cats named Shiva, Shiva, and Yami GROWTH IS MY PASSION Peppermint, chamomile, and ginseng are three of my favorite teas.

Mentors in yoga include A.G. Mohan and T.K.V. Desikachar, among others. WEBSITE: barbnewbornyahoo.com (Barb Newborn’s personal website).

1. Seated Cat Stretch

Maintain a straight posture. Taking deep breaths in via your nose, exhaling through your abdomen, and exhaling through your mouth. Hold for 20 seconds while pulling your tummy in and pushing your bum out. Inhale via your nose, pushing your belly out; exhale through your mouth, tucking your chin in and bringing your tummy inside. Return your body a little closer to the chair. Repeat the process two to three times. Maintain awareness of your actions as you breathe in and out and walk about the room.

2. Seated Forward Bend

Maintain a straight posture. Inhale through your nose, exhale through your abdomen, then exhale through your mouth to complete the cycle. Pulling your belly in and tucking your chin together are good ways to start. Bend your knees to your thighs and allow your arms fall to the side as you bend forward. Hold for 20 seconds, then allow your bodyweight to fall to the floor. Hold for another 20 seconds. Taking a regular breath in and slowly exhaling will suffice. This should be done two to three times.

3. Chest Opener

Sit up straight and fold your hands behind the back of a chair to form a V shape. Taking deep breaths in via your nose, exhaling through your abdomen, and exhaling through your mouth. Put pressure on your stomach and pull yourself forward, pushing your chest out and drawing your shoulder blades together as you do so. Hold for a total of 20 seconds before releasing. Repeat the process two to three times. If you have dislocated your shoulder blades, just place your hands behind your back and stick your chest out — no chair pulling required.

4. Seated Spinal Twist

Maintain a straight posture. Holding the left leg with the right hand is a good idea. Breathe in through your nose, exhale through your abdomen, and exhale through your mouth. Pulling your belly in and twisting your upper body to the left with your right hand will help you lose weight. Hold for a total of 20 seconds. Then repeat the process with the right leg and left arm. Ask someone to hold both of your shoulders as you gently shift your body to the left – hold for 20 seconds if your left arm isn’t functioning properly.

“I Slept On A Yoga Mat For 7 Days – Here’s What Happened To My Body.”

5. Neck Stretch

Maintain a straight posture. Bring your belly out with each inhale and exhale through your lips, drawing your tummy back in with each exhale. Hold the position for 20 seconds while bending your neck to the left. Repeat the process on the right, front, and back. Repeat the process two to three times.

6. Ankle Stretch

Maintain a straight posture. Taking deep breaths in via your nose, exhaling through your abdomen, and exhaling through your mouth. By drawing your belly button in, you should be able to point your toes and press your feet downward. Hold for a total of 20 seconds. Breathe in through your nose, exhale through your abdomen, and exhale through your mouth. Pulling your belly in and flexing is a good exercise (feet pointing upwards, pull your feet towards your legs).

Hold for a total of 20 seconds. Repeat the process two to three times. Use a towel or elastic wrapped over your feet if you have trouble sitting in a chair for long periods of time. READ MORE: “How Practicing Yoga Aided Me in Overcoming My Eating Disorder”

7. Hand Exercises

Maintain a straight posture and rest your arm on the table. Take a water bottle or a tennis ball and hold it in one hand. Maintain a loose grip on your fingers and hand. Taking deep breaths in via your nose, exhaling through your abdomen, and exhaling through your mouth. Keep pulling in your belly while also curling your fingers in and holding the water bottle in your hand for 20 seconds, then release. Pay close attention to your afflicted hand while you take deep breaths in and out. Try this exercise with your eyes closed for a different perspective.

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