Yoga Therapy for Cold Symptoms

Yoga for Cold and Flu: 4 Simple Yoga Stretches Which Can Relieve Cold and Flu Symptoms

Fighting a cold, a cough, or the flu may be a terrible experience. A clogged nose, pounding headache, sinus congestion, coughing, or exhaustion can completely derail your day and make it difficult to concentrate on other tasks. While not every cold cough indicates the presence of a coronavirus, there’s no doubting that colds and flu take their own sweet time to pass, especially in the winter. Although medications and plenty of rest are recommended, performing some easy stretches and yoga postures can also assist to alleviate your symptoms and address cold and flu symptoms at the core cause of the problem.

02 /6Here’s why yoga can help you recover faster

In addition to increasing your immunity and balancing out your body’s chakras in a very gentle manner, yoga provides a variety of other advantages. While heavyweight activities are not suggested when you are unwell, basic stretches can help you get back to normal in no time and without placing any stress on your body. Here are four basic yoga poses that might help you get back on track in no time at all. readmore

03 /6Neck stretch

Neck stretches are one of the most basic but helpful stretches for the body, and a simple neck stretch may help to alleviate the symptoms of a nasty cold as well as lessen tension in the neck and chest, which may be clogged with phlegm. It can also help to alleviate the symptoms of a sinus infection or from sleeping in the same posture for an extended period of time. What to do is as follows: Relax on the floor or in a chair, with both feet crossed on top of each other, and breathe deeply. Maintain a straight back.

Alternatively, you can place your right hand behind your head to provide additional support and to lengthen the stretch.

Make sure to keep your shoulders relaxed and return to your previous position!

Take 3-5 deep breaths and hold.

04 /6Child’s pose

A kneeling position known as Balasana (Child’s Pose) is thought to be extremely stress-relieving and to be a stretch that is quite nice, especially when you are feeling ill or heavy in the head. If you practice this asana on a regular basis, you may find that it provides relief from congestion that might accompany a nasty cold. It’s also a really relaxing stance that may be performed at any time and from any location. What to do and how to do it Make a kneeling position on the floor with your toes together and your knees slightly apart from one another.

The ground should be reached by the thighs and the head.

Hold the stance for two to three minutes while taking slow, deep breaths.

05 /6Standing forward bend

When you are unwell or feeling heavy in the head, Child’s Posture, also known as Balasana, is a kneeling yoga pose that is regarded to be extremely stress-relieving and one of the most relaxing stretches available. It is possible that doing this pose consistently can provide relief from congestion caused by a nasty cold. Also, it’s quite a calming stance that may be practiced at any time and from any location. Do it in the following manner: Make a kneeling position on the floor with your toes together and your knees slightly apart from each other.

Draw in your torso down to the mat with an exhalation. Touching the ground with your thighs and head is ideal. Place your hands on your thighs to keep them from sliding off the table. Hold the stance for two to three minutes while taking slow, deep breaths in and out. readmore

06 /6Seated Spinal Twist

This asana, which is a detoxifying yoga stretch that revolves around the body, can assist to revitalize your internal organs, clear out toxins and mucus that may have become caught in the chest or lung tube, and improve your digestion. It’s a variant on the spinal twist stance, as the name suggests. What to do is as follows: To begin, sit in the spinal twist posture for many minutes. As you take a deep breath in, straighten your spine and lengthen your stretch as you inhale. Starting gently, move and extend your neck to the right first, deepening your movement as far as you are able, then repeat the process.

Repeat the process on the opposite side.

These Are The Yoga Poses You Need To Battle Even The Most Brutal Of Winter Colds

Shutterstock As the temperatures outside continue to plummet, so does your body’s resistance to illness. Winter is notoriously unforgiving when it comes to flu-like symptoms and annoying colds, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t methods to keep congestion and coughing fits at bay throughout the colder months. Incorporating a few preventative yoga postures for a cold into your routine can help you fight off any upcoming illnesses and alleviate any symptoms that you may already be experiencing.

  • When you’re sick, your body is already working hard to combat the terrible disease that’s been tormenting you, and putting even more unneeded strain on yourself can only make matters worse.
  • Although it is not necessary, going on your yoga mat and performing a few easy, immunity-boosting asanas to keep your vigor and health in check is an excellent approach to naturally alleviate aches, pains, and weariness.
  • 01Standing with your back to the wall and bending forward (Uttanasana) Sudafed and Afrin are nice and all, but have you ever heard of the benefits of a good old-fashioned standing forward bend in your routine?
  • Uttanasana is an extremely stress-relieving pose that invigorates your entire nervous system while also allowing for total body relaxation.
  • The Downward Facing Dog is number two on the list (Adho Mukha Svanasana) Despite the fact that downward facing dog is a basic posture that is repeated repeatedly during yoga flows, you may not be aware of the numerous benefits it may bring your body’s immune system.
  • Continue to hold your downward dog for around 10 deep breaths, taking pleasure in the asana’s soothing characteristics.
  • During a sitting spinal twist, as you inhale, straighten your spine and stretch your entire body.
  • Pose with a Supported Bridge (Salamba Setu Bandhasana) Many colds that infiltrate your system throughout the winter months leave you coughing or with a sore throat, causing discomfort in your chest and impairing your breathing abilities.

Increase the amount of support you receive in this asana by using a block or bolster to support your lower back, which will make the exercise wonderfully soothing and rejuvenating.05 Camel Pose (Ustrasana) In addition to its wonderful chest-opening properties, camel posture will also easily clean out any obstructions from your breathing pathways, leaving you feeling like a whole different version of yourself.

  1. In the event that your back isn’t ready for the full expression of the asana, consider tucking your toes and making your heels more accessible as you lean backward, taking care to avoid putting any additional pressure on your sacrum while doing so.
  2. But, to be honest, some yogis might easily remain in this serene inversion even when they aren’t feeling very energetic.
  3. Pose No.
  4. Halasana will be a wonderful remedy for sinusitis that has developed.
  5. Pose of the Fish (08) (Matsyasana) When you have a common cold, the fish posture helps to release your throat chakra and free your chest, both of which can be severely blocked.
  6. 09Legs Up The Wall Pose (Viparita Karani)I’m a firm believer that the legs up the wall pose may alleviate a variety of problems in one’s life.
  7. Your circulation will benefit from this moderate and subtle inversion, and the calming features of the inversion will have you wanting to spend more time in viparita karani on days when you’re not working.
  8. 10 (Corpse Pose) (Savasana) The contemplative power sleep known as Savasana is always popular, and it will be especially beneficial if you have any incoming flu-like symptoms that are stubbornly resistant to treatment.

Rest is absolutely necessary for any sickness, so close your eyes and take a few deep breaths. Remind yourself to take it easy and give your body and mind some much-needed rest and relaxation by being in corpse posture for as long as you need to relax and recover your energies and balance.

7 Poses to Do When You Have a Cold and Can’t Breathe Through Your Nose

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. ‘ It’s that time of year again for the sniffles. Acold, a stuffy or runny nose, itchy throat—all of these symptoms may lead you to believe that you shouldn’t practice yoga, but yoga has therapeutic effects that can help you feel better sooner rather than later. When you’re not feeling well, practicing yoga can really help you battle your disease by increasing your immune system’s strength.

When I designed this sequence, I wanted to incorporate supported, restorative postures that required no effort.

See also10 Yoga Poses and Self-Care Practices to Perform Immediately After Catching a Cold (with Pictures).

Your blood and lymph fluids will begin to move more freely as a result of the mild inversions, Legs-Up-The-Wall Pose and Supported Shoulderstand, which will naturally support your own body in healing.

Try this home practice the next time you’re under the weather:

Bring your block to your side and lie down on your back to rest. Straighten your knees, bringing your feet close to your hips, and ensuring that your feet are hip-width apart with your toes facing directly front. In this position, press your feet down into the mat and raise your hips off the floor. Place the block beneath your tailbone to provide support for your lower back and hips. The block is available in three different heights and may be placed beneath you either lengthwise or widthwise.

  1. If you have a flexible spine, the maximum possible height is likely to be beneficial to you.
  2. Once you get the block securely in position beneath you, elevate your chest slightly and walk your shoulders under you so that you are not resting your neck but rather are supported up on your shoulders, as seen in the picture.
  3. For the length of the position, maintain your eyes on the ceiling and resist the impulse to move your head in any way.
  4. Allowing the block to gently fall out from underneath you, bring your hips down to the floor.
  5. See also 3 Ayurvedic Tips to Boost Immunity and Stay Healthy Throughout the Winter Season.

Supported Shoulderstand

Follow the directions from the first section of supported Bridge Pose to complete the second half. Once you’ve established a stable footing on the block, move up onto your shoulders, laterally rotating your shoulders underneath you without pushing your shoulders away from your ears, and repeat the process on the other side. Take a deep breath in and lift your right leg straight up into the air so that it is perpendicular to the floor. Repeat with your left foot centered on the mat (toward your midline).

First, check that you are properly balanced on the block underneath you, and then slowly pull your left leg up to meet your right leg.

Allow yourself at least 5 to 10 long, steady breaths in this position, before slowly lowering one leg at a time back down to Supported Bridge Pose.

Pull the block out from underneath you by pressing the bottoms of your feet down and lifting your hips up. Take a moment to lie down on your back here. In addition, see 3 Ways Yoga Improves Your Health From Head to Toe.

Reclining Spinal Twist

Keep your back in the same position as in the last posture and move your knees in and out a little bit on the left and right. After a few rocks have been thrown, allow both knees to collapse to the left side simultaneously. Make every effort to stack your knees. Place your left hand on your right knee and extend your right arm out to shoulder height, with your right palm towards the ceiling, as if you were reaching for something. Keep your neck neutral and your gaze fixed on the ceiling, but feel free to close your eyes if you want to get some rest.

After a few deep breaths, slowly raise your knees to your chest and move to the other side.

Supported Reclining Butterfly Pose

This supported position can be achieved with the help of two blocks, a bolster, or a few cushions. In order to do this, the chest should remain elevated and open throughout the exercise, and you should feel no strain in your neck, shoulders, or upper back. Lie down on your mat with a stack of pillows (or a bolster) behind you; the pillows should run the length of your spine. Make sure you have something supporting the top of your bolster so your head is higher than your hips while you’re lying down.

  • Lie down on your back with your hips pushed up against the bottom border of the pillow or bolster and your head at the highest point of the pillow or bolster.
  • Gently spread your legs out to the sides of your mat, and feel free to support your knees up with cushions or blankets if necessary to avoid feeling too much tugging on your inner thighs throughout the pose.
  • Close your eyes and take a few moments to relax in this spot.
  • Try to deepen and slow your breathing down as much as you can, and don’t be afraid to breathe through your mouth if your nose is congested.
  • Allow yourself to take a few deep breaths on your right side before rising to a sitting posture.
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Downward-Facing Dog

All of your props should be moved off your mat and you should be on your hands and knees. Walk your hands one full hand print forward of your hands and knee position, starting at your hands and knee position. Place your hands shoulder-distance apart, with the creases of your wrists parallel to the front edge of the mat, your fingers spread wide apart, and press down evenly with the entire palm of each hand on the mat. As a precaution, if you know you have tight shoulders, spread your hands slightly wider than shoulder-distance and turn your palms out a little toward the corners of the mat.

Here’s a good opportunity to peddle your legs, bending one knee while stretching the opposing heel towards the floor.

If you have tight hamstrings, make sure to maintain both knees bent throughout the exercise.

Make no effort if your heels do not contact or even come close to hitting the ground; it makes no difference.

Continue to hold this position for 5 to 10 breaths before releasing back to your hands and knees. See also: How to Determine Whether or Not to Continue Practicing Yoga While Sick.

Supported Star Pose with a Side Stretch

Bring yourself to a sitting position on your yoga mat. Your legs should be in the shape of a diamond if you draw the inner borders of your feet together and extend your feet a little out in front of you. Laying the block on your feet and rounding your spine forward so that your forehead rests on the block can help you relax. You may be able to modify the height of your block depending on your level of flexibility. Continue to rest here for a few breaths, then gently move your head up. If you are looking straight at the clock at 12 o’clock, lift and shift your torso out toward 2 o’clock, and see if you can walk your hands out in the same way.

Gently elevate your shoulders and go over toward 10 o’clock, then repeat the process on the other side.

Legs-Up-The-Wall Pose

Shift your mat so that it is parallel to a wall. Place the short side of the mat against the wall and fold it in half. Place your mat sideways on the floor with your left hip resting on the wall. Carefully roll onto your back, swinging your legs up the wall, and repeat. Attempt to get yourself as near to the wall as you possibly can without overstretching your hamstring muscles. Placing your hands on your tummy or out to your sides in a goal post posture can help you to focus. Bend your knees and place your feet flat on the wall, pull your hips up and move the block under the sacrum if you’d want to get a little more of an inversion from this position (the bony triangle at the base of your spine).

It’s possible that you’ll have to inch yourself closer to the wall once more.

As long as you’re comfortable, you can stay for up to 5 minutes more.

Relax your body by rolling onto your right side and taking a few deep breaths.

Use Asana to Help Recover from a Cold

Make a u-turn and place your mat against a brick wall. Placing your mat against the wall on its short side is a good idea. Place your mat sideways on the floor with your left hip resting on the wall. Carefully roll onto your back, swinging your legs up the wall, and repeat the process. Attempt to get yourself as near to the wall as you possibly can without overstretching the hamstrings. Placing your hands on your tummy or out to your sides in a goal post posture can help you to concentrate. Bend your knees and place your feet flat on the wall, pull your hips up and move the block under the sacrum if you’d want to get a little more of an inversion out of this position (the bony triangle at the base of your spine).

It’s possible that you’ll have to move yourself closer to the wall once more.

You can remain as long as you like if it’s comfortable for you. Bend your knees, raise your hips up, and pull the block out from underneath you to exit the stance. Take a few deep breaths and roll onto your right side to relax. In addition, see Altitude Sickness Exercising for other ideas.

Practice these gentle poses when you’re feeling under the weather.

Wrap your hands over your forehead to ease stress in your head. Using an ace bandage with a large opening (about 4 inches), wrap it securely around the head, tucking the free end under. You may also wrap it around your eyes, but be careful not to tie it too tightly around your eyes. While you do the positions that follow, the bandage will provide relief for your clogged sinuses.

Standing Forward Bend (Uttanasana)

It energizes the head and respiratory region, and it aids in the clearing of the sinuses. Standing with your feet hip-width apart, rest your forearms on the seat of a chair to keep them from moving. A blanket can also be placed on the chair seat to provide additional cushioning. Hold the position for two to five minutes.

Supported Bridge Pose (Salamba Setu Bandhasana)

Infuses vitality and vitality into the brain, respiratory region, and chest; aids in nasal clearing. Hold a chair seat with your feet hip-width apart and your forearms resting on the seat of the chair. As an additional layer of comfort, you may drape a blanket on the chair seat. 2 to 5 minutes is a good time frame.

Legs Up the Wall Pose (Viparita Karani)

It stimulates the energy of the head and respiratory area, and it aids in the clearing of the sinuses. Stand with your feet hip-width apart and your forearms resting on the seat of a chair. You may also use a blanket to give extra cushioning to the chair seat. Keep it for two to five minutes.

Supported Bound Angle Pose (Salamba Baddha Konasana)

It energizes the head and respiratory region and aids in the clearing of the sinuses. Standing with your feet hip-width apart, rest your forearms on the seat of a chair. You may also use a blanket to give more cushioning to the chair seat. Hold for two to five minutes.

Reclining Twist (Modified Jathara Parivartanasana)

It energizes the head and respiratory region, and it aids in the clearing of the sinuses. Standing with your feet hip-width apart, rest your forearms on the seat of a chair to keep them from moving. A blanket can also be placed on the chair seat to provide additional cushioning. Hold the position for two to five minutes.

Widespread Forward Bend (Upavistha Konasana)

It has a calming effect on the internal organs as well as the psyche. Lie down on the floor with your sitting bones resting against a folded blanket’s edge. Make a straight line with your legs out in front of you and then split them as far as you are able to comfortably. Lie down on a bolster or (if you’re more rigid) the seat of a chair to support your upper body. To provide more height and cushioning when sitting in a chair, you can fold your forearms against the seat. Continue to hold the stance for three to five minutes more or less.

Practice These 5 Yoga Poses to Relieve Cold + Flu Symptoms

It was little more than a sniffle. After then, it appeared to be allergies. Suddenly, though, you have a runny nose. and, yes, you are sick. Big, Dejected Mood! It’s never a good time to be sick, but sickness is a method for your body to communicate with you that it requires something in order to function properly.

You are being reminded by your life that you must lay down the cape because you, too, require self-care. However, being the Superhero that you are, wrapping yourself up in a blanket like a yoga burrito for an extended period of time may cause you to get stir crazy after a few hours.

Practice these 5 yoga poses to combat the sniffles, shift your energy and open your body up to healing:

When performed with the assistance of a yoga block, the Supported Bridge will gently open up your back and chest. This restorative position also helps yoga revive fatigued legs while also stimulating the lungs, thyroid, and digestive systems. Simply recline onto your back with your feet planted and your knees bent to complete the position. Raise your hips and place a block under your sacrum to support your back. You may move the block around at different heights and positions to find the one that feels the most comfortable for your body.

2. Legs Up the Wall Pose (Viparita Karani)

In the event that you are having difficulty breathing, the concept of forward bending with your face into your knees may not sound or feel pleasant. Because of this, Legs Up the Wall is a good choice for a restorative and stress-relieving posture. If you have any fluids in your legs, they will flow away from your feet to give them a respite. Additionally, blood and energy flow will be reversed, resulting in enhanced circulation. One that you can fold up and position under your hips for support, as well as one that will cushion the natural curvature of your neck, are also recommended.

  • Lie down on the floor with a folded blanket under your hips and the back of your legs against the wall — your back should be on the ground (your body will make an L-shape).
  • A soothing and pleasant posture is intended with this position.
  • Breathe.
  • Repeat!

3. Camel (Ustrasana)

Besides extending and strengthening your hip flexors and opening up your chest, Camel Pose is also beneficial to your circulation, neural system, and endocrinological system. Also beneficial to your lymphatic system and digestion, which are all vital factors to consider while you’re unwell. It is the stacking of your hips over your knees and the creation of loads of space throughout your spine that give this pose its power before you bend backward. Keep in mind to drive your hips forward as you lower yourself to the ground and to plant your shins firmly into the earth.

If backbends are not a regular part of your practice, a simple upward dog may be a better option for you to consider.

It’s all right — being unwell provides an excellent chance to learn to listen to your body.

4. Plow (Halasana)

Camel Pose is beneficial for your circulatory, nervous, and endocrine systems, in addition to extending your hip flexors and acting as a fantastic heart opener. Also beneficial to the lymphatic system and digestion, which are all key components to address while you’re unwell. It is the stacking of your hips above your knees and the creation of loads of space throughout your spine that give this pose its power before you bend forward. When you descend back, remember to push your hips forward and to plant your shins firmly into the ground.

It is possible that an easy upward dog will be more beneficial for you if backbends are not a regular part of your practice.

Precaution: if you are experiencing nausea, you may want to avoid this posture because your liver may not be feeling up to any back bending at all! Being unwell is a terrific chance to learn more about your body and how it functions properly.

5. Headstand (Sirsasana)

Camel Pose is beneficial for your circulation, neurological system, and endocrine system, in addition to stretching your hip flexors and acting as a fantastic heart opener. It’s also beneficial to your lymphatic system and digestion, which are all vital factors to consider while you’re ill. It is the stacking of your hips over your knees and the creation of loads of space throughout your spine that gives this pose its power before you bend backward. When you drop back, remember to push your hips forward and to plant your shins firmly into the ground.

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A simple upward dog may be more appropriate for you if backbends are not a regular part of your practice.

It’s all right — being unwell is an excellent opportunity to learn to listen to your body.

10 Immunity Boosting Yoga Asanas To Get Rid Of Cold and Flu

Camel Pose is beneficial for your circulation, neurological system, and endocrine system, in addition to stretching your hip flexors and serving as a terrific heart opener. It’s also beneficial to your lymphatic system and digestion, which are all key components to address while you’re unwell. The power of this posture comes from stacking your hips over your knees and generating a lot of space across your spine before you bend backward. Keep in mind to drive your hips forward as you descend back and to plant your shins firmly into the ground.

If backbends are not a part of your practice, a simple upward dog may be a better option for you.

It’s all right — being unwell is an excellent chance to pay attention to your body.

How Does A Common Cold Start?

Colds are infectious, which means that if someone in your immediate vicinity is afflicted with the virus, you can get it as well. Simple surface contact, such as spoons, doorknobs, keyboards, or anything else that comes into contact with your mouth or nose, can cause the virus to spread to another individual. Because the cold virus is also airborne, if you are in close proximity to a sick person who sneezes, you are more likely to catch a cold yourself. The virus attaches itself to the lining of your nose and throat, causing you to become sick.

How Does Yoga Help To Cure A Cold?

Due to the fact that yoga balances the sympathetic (response/fight) and parasympathetic (rest) nervous systems, it can help you battle the cold. White blood cells receive assistance from the immune system in their battle against pathogens. These white blood cells are normally seen circulating in the thymus gland, which is located in the chest cavity.

Yoga asanas (mostly inversions) can assist to bring these white blood cells to the head and throat, as well as a surge of fresh blood, which can help to ease the symptoms of sinusitis and congestion in the afflicted sinuses and throat.

10 Basic Asanas In Yoga For Cold Relief

  1. In this pose, you will find: Uttanasana, Adho Mukha Svanasana, Ustrasana, Viparita Karani, Setu Bandhasana, Dhanurasana, Halsasana, Matsysana, Salamba Sirsansana, Shavasana, and more.

1. Uttanasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock The Uttanasana, also known as the Standing Forward Bend, is a yoga pose that is proven to improve blood circulation. By emptying up the sinus passages, it helps to remove obstructions and allows for more full breathing to take place. It stimulates the neurological system and helps to alleviate stress and tension in the body. For further information on this asana, please see the following link: UttanasanaBack to the Table of Contents

2. Adho Mukha Svanasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock The Adho Mukha Svanasana, also known as the Downward Dog Stretch, is an asana in which the heart is elevated above the level of the head. When you do this, you will experience a reverse pull of gravity, which will aid in the healthy circulation of lymph and blood. The slight inversion promotes the free movement of white blood cells throughout the body and also aids in the drainage of the sinuses and other nasal passages. For further information on this asana, please see the following link: Adho Mukha Svanasana.

3. Ustrasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock This asana, commonly known as the Camel Pose, helps to open up the chest and clean up all of the passageways in the body. It is critical that you strive to take in as much air as you possibly can while in this position. Using this method, you may help free up all of the clogged places that are producing your cold. Return to the Table of Contents

4. Viparita Karani

Image courtesy of Shutterstock To combat respiratory illnesses, the Legs Up The Wall Position is an excellent pose to practice on a regular basis. When you perform this asana, you will notice that you are no longer suffering from the headaches or backaches that are associated with a common cold. Practicing this asana helps to quiet the mind and build strength as your body fights with the common cold. It also aids in the reduction of weariness, which is frequent after a cold or the flu. This asana facilitates the movement of immunological cells throughout the body.

Return to the Table of Contents

5. Setu Bandhasana

Shutterstock provided the image. To combat respiratory illnesses, the Legs Up The Wall Position is a fantastic pose to practice on your own. When you perform this asana, you will notice that you are no longer suffering from the headaches or backaches that are associated with a cold. It is believed that practicing this asana can help to relax the mind and build strength as your body fights with the common cold. It will also assist in lowering weariness, which is frequent after a cold. It is believed that this asana aids in the movement of immunological cells throughout the body.

Viparita Karani is a well-known actress and singer.

6. Dhanurasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock The Bow Pose, also known as Dhanurasana, is a great way to extend your back, chest, neck, and stomach. It also has the added benefit of opening up your chest and neck. In this way, it will help you breathe better when you have a cold or other respiratory problem. This asana is quite relaxing, and it is especially beneficial if you are having trouble sleeping due to a cold.

This is a vigorous asana that necessitates taking deep and complete breaths. If you are experiencing shortness of breath, do not attempt to maintain this posture for an extended period of time. Return to the Table of Contents

7. Halasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock This pose is extremely beneficial for persons suffering from sinusitis and for re-establishing the function of the adrenal glands. It helps to increase blood circulation in the body and also creates a clean channel for detoxification. Taking this position can help to reset your parasympathetic nervous system, allowing it to repair the body more quickly and assisting you in getting rid of your cold. Return to the Table of Contents

8. Matsyasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock This asana causes your chest to rise and your neck to open up as you perform it. This helps to enhance your breathing while also assisting in the treatment of a cold. With a cushion, bolster, or yoga blocks, one may support the upper thoracic back during a cold, allowing for the most efficient recuperation. Return to the Table of Contents

9. Salamba Sirsasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock This may appear to be one of the most difficult and challenging yoga asanas to do. This exercise helps to invigorate your body while also aiding in detoxification since the stagnated blood flows from your toes and filters through your heart before moving on to drain your brain. This asana also has the additional benefit of raising your immunity and aiding in the battle against a cold. If you are experiencing a cold, it is recommended that you try the position against a wall in case you get confused or require additional support.

10. Shavasana

Image courtesy of Shutterstock The Shavasana is a deeply relaxing position that is used by many yoga practitioners. When you have a cold, sometimes all you need to do is rest your body and let it heal. It energizes the body and aids in the stronger defense against viruses that cause colds and flu. For further information on this asana, please see the following link: Shavasana (return to the starting point) Have you ever tried practicing yoga to get rid of a cold? A cold, sinus infection, or flu, although being such a common condition, may be quite debilitating.

You will notice a significant improvement.

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Was this article of assistance? The following two tabs alter the content of the section below. With a RYT 200 certification from the Yoga Vedanta Centre, Anirudh has been teaching yoga for over a decade. His teaching style utilizes this information. more

Yoga Therapy for Colds and Flu • Yoga Basics

While we are all susceptible to the occasional cold or flu, the practicing yogi/yogini is less likely to catch a cold or flu, and if he or she does, he or she recovers more quickly than the average person. In part, this is due to yoga’s well-documented skills to manage the immune system, keeping it robust and healthy so that it can survive infections, as well as yoga’s potential to improve immunological function through particular yogic practices. One of the key reasons that a regular practice of yoga can help prevent and treat the common cold is because of yoga’s stress-relieving properties.

  • Except for their overall relaxing properties, the restorative postures and forward bends of yoga serve to soothe the nervous system, which in turn helps to lower overall body tension.
  • A boost to the immune system may be obtained from any physical exercise, but yoga, with its inherent stress-relieving and immune-enhancing features, will provide a short-term boost as well as long-term strengthening of the immune system.
  • This is in addition to a regular yoga practice.
  • The most helpful postures for this purpose are the Cobra, Pigeon, Fish, Boat, Bow, and Bridge positions (as shown above).
  • Increased passive circulation of the lymphatic system, which is responsible for the generation and circulation of immune cells to protect the body against viruses and bacteria, is facilitated by inversions.
  • Twists and hip openers stimulate the immune system’s secondary organs, which include the spleen and lymph nodes in the groin and armpits, which help to fight infection.
  • Twists such as the seated twist, prayer twist, and knee down twist, as well as hip openers such as the bound angle, seated angle, and pigeon, can be used to stimulate and strengthen these organs, helping them to remain strong and healthy.

When performed at the onset of a sore throat, the lion position has been shown to significantly reduce the severity of the sore throat and its progression.

Jala Neti is the practice of using a Neti pot to pour water down the nasal passages, washing away bacteria and germs that can cause illness and infection.

The emphasis on whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes in a yogic diet naturally supplies the body with the right nourishment as well as an abundance of antioxidants, which the immune system need to function at its best level of performance.

It is via these varied yoga practices and postures that one may maintain a robust immune system that one can avoid and recover from a typical cold or flu much more rapidly than through other means.

If there is no improvement in your symptoms after three to four days, or if your symptoms increase, you should seek medical help from a skilled health-care professional.

Timothy has studied and taught a variety of yoga methods, and he just finished a 500-hour Advanced Pranakriya Yoga training program in India.

He has published two yoga books and more than 500 articles on the practice and philosophy of yoga, as well as several other topics.

Disclosure: YogaBasics.com is a participant in a number of affiliate marketing networks. Amazon Associates receive a commission on eligible sales made via their website. When you click on external links, we may gain a small compensation, which helps us to keep the lights on and the website running.

Fight the Flu With These 7 Yoga Poses

Seasonal influenza (cold and flu) is upon us, and with it, every and every virus you may encounter makes its presence known. And I know what you’re thinking: exercise is probably the last thing on your mind when you’re feeling under the weather, but research has shown that it can really help you feel a bit better. So go ahead and get moving. Following on from the previous article, what happens to your body on each day of your menstrual cycle Doctor Richard Besser told CNN that stress-relieving techniques such as yoga and breathing exercises may help boost immunity when the body is fighting infections like the common cold.

Besser explained.

Breaking a sweat is typically regarded safe if your symptoms are above the neck, according to Besser.

Keep in mind to conclude your exercise with a little (or large) “Om” – it’s an excellent technique to clear up congested nasal passages.

See also:  8 Times American Presidents Sounded Like Yogis

Downward Facing Dog

It is responsible for transporting white blood cells throughout the body as well as draining the nasal passages. Photograph courtesy of Maggie Giuffrida/SheKnows From Mountain Pose (standing posture), stretch your hands down to the floor, bending your knees if necessary, and repeat the process. Walk your hands out approximately three to four feet in front of your toes, and then walk them back again. Lift your hips up into the heavens, pressing your palms into your hands, then press your heels back into your palms, attempting to make them flat on the earth.

Standing Forward Bend

Stretches the hamstrings and lower back, reduces anxiety, relieves headaches, improves digestion, and helps to calm the nervous system. Photograph courtesy of Maggie Giuffrida/SheKnows Stretch your arms and chest down toward the ground while standing straight up with your feet together and your arms at your side. Reach your hands up and above into a prayer stance, then swan dive your arms and chest down into the earth. Placing your fingers on the floor on each side of your feet, as you inhale, raise your head and chest up while maintaining your fingertips on the floor, and then gently begin to lower your chest closer to your knees.

To get the most out of the stretch, keep pressing your chin and chest in towards your knees and thighs as much as possible. Always remember not to lock your knees and to retain a modest bend in them at all times to avoid damage.

Seated Forward Bend

It relieves headaches and anxiety while also reducing tiredness. Photograph courtesy of Maggie Giuffrida/SheKnows Starting from a seated position on your mat with your feet spread out in front of you, reach your hands up toward the sky and bend forward at your hips, allowing your arms to descend toward the earth and reaching forward until your toes are in contact with the ground. You should plant your palms and drop your forehead down toward your legs with your nose pointing towards your knees when you can’t reach any more.

Seated Spinal Twist

It aids in the detoxification of the body by getting things flowing, as well as activating the secondary organs of the immune system. While sitting upright with your feet spread out in front of you, bend your right knee and draw it in toward your chest, bringing the heel of your right foot as near to your body as possible. Afterwards, cross your bent right leg across your bent left leg, placing your right foot firmly into the ground on the other side. To make a more dramatic twist, either maintain your left leg stretched out in front of you or bring it up and around underneath your body in the opposite way.

As you do so, place your right hand back behind your sit bones.

Repeat the process on the opposite side.

Bound Angle Pose

It stimulates the heart and increases overall circulation, and it can be used to alleviate moderate sadness, anxiety, and exhaustion, among other things. Photograph courtesy of Maggie Giuffrida/SheKnows To begin, sit with your legs straight out in front of you and your arms at your sides. To begin, take a deep breath in and bend your knees, bringing them in close to the chest while keeping your feet flat on the floor. When you pull your heels toward your pelvis, you should be able to drop your knees out to the sides while pressing the soles of your feet together.

Bridge Pose

This herb helps to stimulate the heart and circulate the blood more effectively, as well as to alleviate minor sadness, anxiety, and weariness. SheKnows.com image courtesy of Maggie Giuffrida Put your legs straight out in front of you and sit in that position. To begin, take a deep breath in and bend your knees, bringing them in close to the chest and placing your feet flat on the floor. When you pull your heels toward your pelvis, drop your knees out to the sides while pressing the soles of your feet together.

Keeping your feet firmly planted on the floor as you grasp hold of the toes or clasp the hands around the ankles or shins as you continue to press your arms and elbows into your legs, bringing the knees even closer to the floor, is essential.

Legs Up the Wall

By improving blood circulation, this moderate inversion aids in the movement of lymph fluid and immunological cells throughout your body. As an added bonus, it relieves back pain and sleeplessness while also aiding digestion. Photograph courtesy of Maggie Giuffrida/SheKnows Lay down on your back and straighten your legs up the wall, stretching your feet toward the ceiling for five minutes while sitting sideways next to a wall, positioning your sit bones as near as possible to the wall. For an extra five minutes, you can either maintain your legs straight and together or divide them into a V shape.

The original version of this article was published in November 2015.

Combating Cold with Yoga

The most prevalent occurrence associated with any seasonal shift is the outbreak of illnesses that accompany it. As the seasons change from summer to monsoon to winter, a large number of individuals continue to struggle with the flu and the common cold. By default, our body’s immune system attempts to clear itself of the disease; nevertheless, it is essential to take additional preventative and therapeutic actions in order to fight the disease more effectively. Despite the fact that contemporary drugs are quite successful, they are not the only alternative available today.

Yoga is an old and unique discipline that aids in the development of a stronger body as well as a more focused mind.

Here are a few yoga poses that will aid you in your battle against the common cold:

1. Nadi Shodhan Pranayama (Alternate Nostril breathing technique)

With the Alternate Nostril breathing method, you can help free up a clogged nose and allow more oxygen to go to your lungs more quickly and efficiently. It also aids in the discharge of tension and the relaxation of the body. Exercise this breathing method for 7-8 rounds, two or three times daily until you have beaten the cold.

2. Kapal Bhati Pranayama(Skull Shining breathing technique)

During the Skull Shining breathing method, the powerful exhalations that are performed serve to clear the respiratory tract, allowing for more comfortable breathing. As an added bonus, it energizes the neurological system, boosts blood circulation, and elevates the spirits. Performing 2-3 rounds of this breathing method twice a day should provide you with renewed energy to tackle the cold.

3. Hastapadasana (Standing forward bend)

Standing forward bend is a yoga pose that promotes the flow of blood to the head while also clearing the sinuses and nasal passages. It also has a stimulating effect on the neurological system and helps to reduce stress in the body.

4. Matsyasana (Fish pose)

Deep breathing exercises performed in this yoga pose might bring treatment from respiratory problems and symptoms such as the common cold.

The Fish position also helps to release stress in the neck and shoulders, which may cause the body to become sluggish.

5. Viparita Karani (Legs up the Wall pose)

Legs up the Wall pose, which is another extremely efficient yoga posture for treating respiratory issues, is another excellent choice. This position is beneficial in the treatment of headaches and backaches. It also has a calming effect on the mind, which aids in maintaining mental strength when suffering from a cold.

6. Shavasana (Corpse pose)

It is customary to perform the Corpse pose as the final posture in a yoga sequence because it allows the body to enter a state of profound and contemplative relaxation. In this position, the body is able to relax and revitalize while also releasing tension. The beginning of every season is a wonderful chance to take use of it to its maximum extent, without being hampered by a typical cold or illness. Yoga practice on a regular basis strengthens the immune system and improves its ability to fight foreign pathogens more effectively.

  • The knowledge of Ayurveda, in contrast to allopathic medicine, which focuses on the management of disease, provides us with the ability to prevent disease and eradicate its core cause.
  • Yoga practice helps to improve the body and the mind, and it has a variety of health advantages.
  • Practicing yoga poses under the guidance of a certifiedSri Sri Yogateacher is quite beneficial.
  • Locate an Art of Living Center where you may take a Sri Sri Yoga course.
  • Send us an email at [email protected] if you have any questions.

3 Simple & Basic Yoga Poses to Fight the Common Cold

  • InLiving Well
  • Published on Wednesday, February 15th, 2017.

As the weather turns cooler, many of us are finding ourselves with the sniffles or sore throats as the season progresses. Take control of the symptoms of a common cold by practicing these yoga asanas, which assist to maintain a healthy balance between the sympathetic nervous system (the “fight or flight” reaction) and the parasympathetic nervous system (rest and relaxation). Anything that disturbs this balance, whether it originates from within (such as hunger, the need for oxygen, or fear) or from without (such as temperature change, movement, or watching a movie), necessitates a shift from one state of balance to another, such as digestion, in order to restore equilibrium to the body.

Doing a shoulder stand can also help prevent the common cold by doing a As Sandie West, the founder and CEO of Creative Chakra SpaYoga Studio, an oceanfront holistic spa and yoga studio in Marina Del Rey, California, explains to us, Taking one yoga session a week can assist to decrease cortisol levels (i.e.

  1. Continue reading to learn about the advantages of these postures as well as the fundamentals of how to achieve them from West.
  2. Shoulder Stand (Sarvangasana) has the following benefits: Brings blood to the head and throat, so easing nasal congestion and tension, and enhances the immunological activities of the hormone system, which are important for good health.
  3. Bring the elbows close to the torso as you turn your upper arms out and stretch them toward your legs.
  4. When you inhale and rise your trunk, bend your knees over your abdomen.
  5. 5.Support the back with the hands and lift the trunk and legs higher, bringing the chest closer to the chin; lower the hands and press the back ribs forward; repeat on the other side.
  6. Raise the shoulder blades and extend the trunk up with the support of your hands, then straighten your legs until they are vertical.
  7. It stimulates the thyroid gland, which is located at the base of the throat and is responsible for regulating metabolism.

Increases blood flow to the thymus and spleen, allowing white blood cells to more effectively target infection.

Lift your head and trunk off the ground and shift your whole weight to your elbows (Figure 2).

4.To emerge out of the posture, lay your body weight on your elbows once more and slowly raise your head over your shoulders.

In this asana, you will massage your abdominal organs and digestive tract, which will increase circulation and push the contents of your stool along, which will aid in the relief of constipation.

As an added benefit, this pose helps your heart to rest deeply and decreases tension, which aids in the strengthening of your immune system.

How-to: 1.Lounge on your back in a comfortable supine posture with your arms and legs stretched about a foot and a half apart, and your arms a few inches away from your body with the palms of your hands up.

3.Become aware of the sensations in your right leg and foot.

It should be raised a few inches from the floor.

Simply roll it from side to side and put it out of your mind.

4.Now, take a deep breath and strain your pelvis and buttocks; exhale to release the tension.

5.Take a deep breath and fill your tummy with air. Hold it for a few seconds, then let it flood out from your mouth – don’t force it. You might also be interested in:

  • Get your body ready for a good night’s sleep by following these steps: The Great Weight-Loss Debate: Why Do Men Lose Weight More Rapidly Than Women. and How Can Women Make Up for Lost Time
  • Do these 5 gentle (and really beneficial!) yoga poses every day for a week. 10 At-Home Workout DVDs for *Almost* Every Fitness Level
  • Natural Ways to Boost Your Immunity
  • 10 At-Home Workout DVDs for *Almost* Every Fitness Level

This is one of our favorite pieces of writing. It was first published on January 2, 2016, and has since been updated.

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