Yogi Chefs are Changing the Way America Eats

Yogi Chefs are Changing the Way America Eats

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more.

Five yogi chefs, impassioned by their principles and practice, are changing the way America eats.

Food has always been a source of fascination for humans, but it’s safe to say that we’re becoming increasingly conscious of the food we consume—not only in terms of its flavor and nutritional worth, but also in terms of its environmental, political, and social implications. It is a daily decision whether to purchase from local farmers, worldwide businesses, or somewhere in between, and whether to consume food that has been “organically” cultivated or “conventionally” grown. And those alternatives have influence: Few decisions we make on a daily basis have the type of far-reaching repercussions that what we put on our plates does.

According to the five yogis highlighted in this article, food has the ability to enhance our health and well-being, as well as the welfare of our fellow human beings, as well as the health of the earth.

All we have to do is look within.

Yogi Chef Bryant Terry Feeds the Change

Despite the fact that food has always been a source of fascination for humans, it’s safe to say that we are becoming increasingly conscious of the food we consume—not only in terms of its flavor and nutritional worth, but also in terms of its environmental, political, and economical consequences. Choosing between buying from local farmers or worldwide businesses, or anything in between, and whether to consume food that is organic or “conventionally” cultivated is something we do on a daily basis.

Some members of the yoga community, who are well-versed in the culinary arts, are contributing to the development of our enlightened connection with food, which is not surprising.

Every day, at every meal, yoga feeds their efforts to effect change in unexpected ways, and it serves as a gentle reminder that we all have the ability to make a difference.

Yogi Chef Anupama is Connecting Farms to Classrooms

The majority of schoolchildren in the United States do not understand where their food comes from and do not have the opportunity to see fresh foods in their raw form, according to Anupama Joshi, co-director of the National Farm to School Network, a Los Angeles-based organization that promotes partnerships between elementary and high schools and local farms. As a result, she claims, their preferences tend to gravitate toward meals that are typically highly processed and those they are familiar with.

The importance of food in the educational system cannot be overstated, adds Joshi, because it has implications not only for academic accomplishment but also for general development and health.

Each program is unique and special in that it is born out of the needs and wants of the people who live in it.

Three to five times a week, Joshi devotes time to yoga practice, both at home and in a class setting.

The time you spend in your yoga practice—this hour, this half hour, this minute—is dedicated to you; separate away all of the other roles and professions that you perform and use that time to develop yourself, she tells me.” If you want to be authentic in your other responsibilities, you must first be authentic in yourself.” The way parents and communities think about how we’re feeding our children has to change, and there needs to be more discussion about how our food system is set up and how we may think about reforming it.

Yogi Chef Matthew Kenney Introduces Raw Cuisine

According to Anupama Joshi, co-director of the National Farm to School Network, an organization based in Los Angeles that promotes relationships between elementary and high schools and local farms, many of the nation’s schoolchildren don’t know where their food comes from and don’t get to see fresh foods in their raw form. Consequently, she claims, their preferences tend to favor meals that are familiar to them, which are frequently heavily processed. It is the goal of Farm to School initiatives to remedy this situation as quickly as possible.

  • ‘Farm to School’ is responsible for making those linkages,’ she says.
  • Individual programs are developed in response to the needs and wants of their respective communities.
  • Three to five times a week, Joshi devotes time to yoga, which he does both at home and at a studio.
  • The time you spend in your yoga practice—this hour, this half hour, this minute—is dedicated to you; separate away all of the other duties and tasks that you have and use that time to strengthen yourself, she tells me.
  • The way parents and communities think about how we’re feeding our children has to change, and there needs to be more discussion about how our food system is set up and how we may think about reforming it.

Yogi Chef Cat Cora Feeds the World

Food Network viewers know Cat Cora as a TV personality, cookbook author, and the first (and only) female Iron Chef, but she has also gained recognition for her charitable activities. As a result of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Cora launched Chefs for Humanity, a grassroots group based after Doctors Without Borders that raises funds and mobilizes resources for disaster relief and hunger-related problems throughout the world. “I have been so fortunate in my professional life that I feel both a duty and a desire to give back,” Cora explains.

” What strategies can we use to improve nutrition in public schools?

Cora traveled to Haiti to assist in the distribution of food and the development of plans for sustainable agriculture and nutritional education.

In partnership with Chefs for Humanity, Cora hopes to assist children in the United States and throughout the globe who are in need of more food, better nutrition, and an infrastructure that can provide them with these necessities.

“Yoga has helped me understand my objectives for my life a little bit better,” she adds of the practice. “Because my life and job are both fast-paced, yoga is a more quiet environment where I can come to focus myself.”

Yogi Chef Louisa Shafia is All About Eco-Friendly Cooking

Cat Cora is well-known to Food Network viewers as a TV personality, cookbook author, and the first (and so far only) female Iron Chef, but she is also well-known for her humanitarian activities. Upon learning about the tsunami that struck the Indian Ocean in 2004, Cora launched Chefs for Humanity, a grassroots organization based after Doctors Without Borders that raises funds and mobilizes resources for disaster relief and hunger-related problems throughout the world. According to Cora, “I feel so fortunate in my professional life that I have both a duty and a desire to give back.” The goal for me was to provide a space where people could come and discuss themes such as: “How can we end hunger?” What strategies can we use to improve nutrition in our public school systems?

Cora traveled to Haiti to assist with food distribution and the development of plans for sustainable agriculture and nutritional education.

She hopes to aid children in the United States and throughout the globe who require more food, better nutrition, and an infrastructure capable of providing it through Chefs for Humanity.

Yin yoga and other restorative practices help Cora to balance all of the attention she puts outward, so she looks to them for balance.

Column: Changing the way Cincinnati eats

  • Change menus, and you’ll change people’s lives. A national network of organizations, including Chefs Collaborative, has set out to accomplish this goal. A branch of Chefs Collaborative has recently been established in Cincinnati. All of our members work in the food industry as chefs, farmers, and food producers, and they are all important parts of the local food community. But more than that, our members are people who are passionate about growing, sourcing, preparing, and serving healthier food, as well as contributing to the creation of a more sustainable food system in the world. Having owned and operated Bouquet Restaurant in Covington, Kentucky, since 2007, this idea has been embedded in my company’s operations. Being elected as co-president of the Chefs Collaborative in Cincinnati has opened my eyes to the reality that I am not alone in my struggles. Our food community is full with wonderful people who are working hard to transform the way we eat in Greater Cincinnati and the surrounding areas. Our local chapter members flew to New York City in late April to hear from some of the industry’s most knowledgeable professionals about how to transform how Americans eat, beginning with our own neighborhood. There were several similar elements that emerged over this period of time when it comes to developing a robust and sustainable food community. Choosing foods that are delicious, locally sourced, seasonally fresh, and made with whole or minimally processed ingredients is beneficial to us as individuals, as consumers, as members of local agricultural communities, and as members of the environment. Following that, as cooks, we should continue to educate ourselves about environmentally friendly options. This will allow us to act as role models to other chefs and members of society by sourcing seasonal and sustainable ingredients and translating them into wonderful meals that our customers will want to come back for again and again. On a bigger scale, the culinary community as a whole may act as a catalyst for positive change by providing a market for high-quality food and assisting in the preservation of local agricultural and fishing communities. Chefs Collaborative’s objective is that sustainable techniques will become second nature to every chef in the United States, and our local Cincinnati chapter is dedicated to bringing that vision to fruition in our community. We’re fortunate in that we currently have a beautiful network of local and sustainable farmers in place
  • Nevertheless, it’s critical that chefs, producers, and the general public continue to support them in the future. We have the opportunity to collaborate with a number of wonderful farms, including the owners and employees of Carriage House Farm in Ohio, Yogi and the Farmer, an urban farm in Covington, Kentucky, and Wolf Tree Farms in Northern Kentucky. These are just a handful of the farms that are making a difference in our local food community, and I’m happy to be able to collaborate with such inspiring people. Bouquet’s menu is built on the use of fresh, seasonal foods sourced locally, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. You are not need to operate a restaurant in order to contribute to the local food community, though. Attending farmers markets and subscribing to a CSA are two ways to show your support for local farmers (community supported agriculture). And if you’re going out to dinner on a Friday night, consider dining at a restaurant that buys ingredients from local and sustainable sources wherever possible. Any and all of these actions will benefit the local and regional food system, which means they will safeguard the health of our communities while also promoting the economies of their respective regions. Changing our eating habits today will help us to build a vibrant and sustainable food community in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky now and in the future, as well. For more information about Chefs Collaborative, please see their website. Bouquet Restaurant is owned and operated by Stephen Williams, who is also the chef.
See also:  Farm-to-Table Dining

Helping Change the Way America Eats

Jersey City is located in the state of New Jersey. The 10th of December, 2014 (PRWEB) It has been revealed that EVGE, a Greek olive oil firm that specializes in extra virgin olive oil as well as olives and olive paste, would be launching their goods in the United States. EVGE’s Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil are derived from Koroneiki olives grown in the legendary Peloponnese area of Greece, and both are certified organic. The olives are harvested by hand and then cold pressed soon after harvesting to guarantee that their nutritional properties are preserved, in addition to having a low acidity, a balanced taste, a rich texture, and a bright scent, among other characteristics.

  • John Papageorgiou, CEO and Managing Director of the firm, stated that “America has begun to embrace the Mediterranean-Greek diet” while speaking about the company’s long-term objectives for the American market.
  • When it comes to healthy cooking and eating, the most important ingredient is olive oil, and EVGE makes some of the best in the world.
  • Our company’s name, which translates from Greek as ‘exceptionally done,’ is more than simply a moniker for us; it is also our source of inspiration.” EVGE has already received a number of notable accolades as a result of its rapid growth.
  • However, the firm chose to develop a superior-quality Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) that exceeds the criteria suggested by the International Olive Oil Council as well as organic certification agencies in both Europe and the United States.
  • The EVGE Olive Paste was recently acknowledged and honored in the Great Taste Awards 2014 Competition in the United Kingdom.
  • The EVGE Hellenic Food Company is a family-owned and operated business.
  • The firm intends to increase its operations since its present olive oil output, which ranges between 1-1.2 million bottles per year, is insufficient to fulfill demand.
  • The EVGE webpage is as follows: () More information may be found by clicking here.

Press Releases about the Greek Diet The post Helping to Change the Way America Eats appeared first on Painless Diet Plans – Diet Plans That Work. originating from WordPress and delivered by IFTTT More posts like this may be found on TumblrIFTTT. WordPress

Chef Profile National Kale Day

National Kale Day is observed on February 26th to recognize the great health benefits of kale, to showcase the culinary flexibility of kale, and to encourage the consumption, cultivation, and sharing of kale throughout the United States. National Kale Day is observed annually on the first Wednesday in October, on the first Wednesday in October. Why? Because “kale is not just a superfood, but it is also a superhero when it comes to health,” according to the author. Dr. Drew Ramsey, a psychiatrist, author, and farmer, was the inspiration for the creation of National Kale Day.

  • His clinical practice at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, where he is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry, concentrates on the treatment of depression and anxiety.
  • The author Jennifer Iserloh is a pioneer in the promotion of healthy, vibrant lifestyles via the consumption of tasty and nutritious meals that are simple to prepare.
  • Iserloh is a best-selling author of several books, including 50 Shades of Kale and Healthy Cheats.
  • In her capacity as a chef, she actively promotes Grow NYC and the Hoboken Farmer’s market, believing that farm to table may revolutionize the way Americans eat and, as a result, help reverse the obesity epidemic.

Website

Some of the world’s most successful businesses are founded in an extremely easy method. Identify an issue, develop a solution, and then put the solution into action. Oh, wait a minute. That’s how things operate in our fantasies. In reality, we all know that there are many more processes involved, as well as a number of unforeseen twists and turns. However, every now and again, the ingredients do come together in a stunning display of immaculate timing, as in this example. The current startup I’m profiling, Plated, appears to be a good illustration of this.

  • Plated provides would-be gourmands with a simple method to produce home cooked food developed by professional chefs in under 30 minutes, with no special skills required.
  • The options are reasonably priced and change on a weekly basis.
  • First and foremost, people are becoming more comfortable with the idea of purchasing food online, and there appears to be a widespread movement toward rediscovering the importance of healthy home cooking.
  • The addition of a service that brings all of these pieces together in a convenient and inexpensive bundle completes the picture.
  • The company’s success is self-explanatory, as is the company’s reputation.
  • Since then, they’ve had weekly growth in the double digits.
  • They are gearing up for a countrywide expansion that will take place at the end of this summer.
See also:  Model Men

Having graduated with a BA from Dartmouth and spent a year in Indonesia working for a microfinance organization, he returned to the United States to pursue an MBA at Harvard Business School and an MPA at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, all of which were completed in 2010.

Plated was born after a year spent in what he described as “.

Many other entrepreneurs have stated that the problem of scaling up to growth is a fascinating one, and he concurs.

It’s been over a year, and everything still feels like “.just a gigantic laboratory experiment.” Using a lean startup process, which follows the common pattern of “hypothesize, test, and either fail or succeed,” Taranto follows what is increasingly becoming a strong tradition.

Every every day of the year.

Taranto intends to both contribute to and commercialize this virtuous sharing loop, which he expects to do at the same time.

In the opinion of Nick, the non-restaurant food market is worth around $1 trillion, with barely one percent of that value occurring online.

This suggests the emergence of a $30-60 billion dollar sector in the United States over the next few years.

What are some of the most amazing things he’s discovered since the introduction of Plated.com?

He and his staff have been brainstorming innovative methods to broaden their customer base, such as reinventing the concept of “date night.” In my opinion, there is an excellent potential here for many really intelligent guys to begin cooking for their wives and girlfriends.

in large part, why we continue to wake up in the morning and work to put this together.” In the meanwhile, Taranto advises businesses to follow the counsel of so many other great businesspeople: don’t overthink things and be prepared to be adaptable.

According to him, “No combat strategy survives first encounter with the enemy,”* in the spirit of a famous 19th-century military adage, “No business plan survives first touch with the client.” Prussian Field Marshal Helmuth von Moltke the Elder is credited with inventing the phrase (1800-1891)

Here Come the Chefs

One of the most significant culinary shifts in restaurant history may be going place right in front of our eyes: chefs—true, honest-to-goodness chefs—are taking over fast-casual kitchens, and we may not even realize it. Did you think that was a one-time thing? For 2016, these chef-driven fast-casual restaurants are the second most popular trend in the business, trailing only the popularity of locally sourced meat and seafood. That is not my prediction; rather, it comes directly from the chefs’ mouths—more specifically, from the mouths of 20,000 chefs who responded to the National Restaurant Association’s “What’s Hot” poll, conducted in partnership with the American Culinary Federation (ACF).

  1. However, some of the nation’s most fascinating, adventurous, and, yes, disgruntled chefs have chosen to follow the trends—and the money—instead of bucking the trend and going against it.
  2. To put this in context, that is about ten times the increase seen by the rest of the fast-food business during the same period.
  3. This goes beyond the financial aspect.
  4. They are looking for anything that is fairly priced.
  5. They want it to be as healthy as possible for you.
  6. “Millennials are food-aware, food-serious, and food-adventurous,” she adds.
  7. The “2015 Fast-Casual Chains Survey” conducted by the company found that 78 percent of consumers would want to see more local chefs start fast-casual cafes in their communities.

There are several spokes in the spinning world of chef-driven fast-casual eateries.

Others attribute this to a foodie-infused society, spurred by the Food Network and Millennials who are preoccupied with social media.

You shouldn’t expect the trend to change direction other than upward.

However, that figure might more than quadruple within ten years.

Fast-casual eateries like this are where Millennials prefer to eat out.

She claims that the chef-driven fast-casual industry has “democratized” eating because the majority of people do not have the means to spend money on good dining.

It’s also grown popular among professional chefs who place the integrity of food at the top of their buying lists, such as Franklin Becker, who uses it in his cooking.

Becker’s decision to go from fine dining to fast casual was motivated by more than just economics.

At the age of 20, Becker was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, which he has since managed successfully.

These apparently unconnected challenges, taken together, convinced Becker that he needed to discover a method to provide better meals to everyone.

“We didn’t have anywhere to grab a fast lunch and feel comfortable about what we ate,” he explains.

The majority of the food is grown locally, is seasonal, and is organic.

A regular lunch will cost you $10–$12, which is a few dollars higher than a standard fast food meal.

From midday to 2 p.m., one of the New York restaurants serves approximately 1,000 meals every day at its most busy, according to Duddleston.

The company’s long-term objective is to expand across the country; four to six more facilities are expected to open this year.

“I’ve noticed a complete 180-degree shift in the way the American public eats.

“With fast casual, you have the opportunity to touch so many more people and make such an impact in so many people’s lives,” he explains. “We aim to revolutionize the way people eat in the United States.” One restaurant, if not one food, at a time, is the goal.

Annemarie Ahearn

The shop will not function properly if cookies are deactivated on your computer or device. Salt Water Farm, a culinary school for home chefs on Maine’s Penobscot Bay, was launched in 2009 by Annemarie Ahearn and her husband. She began her studies at Colorado College, where she acquired an interest in food while living in Aix-en-Provence, where she studied Provincial cuisine and frequented the open-air markets. She received her bachelor’s degree in culinary arts in 2011. Later, she worked as an apprentice in the kitchen at Le Jardin Notre Dame, a Parisian restaurant.

She worked in the editorial department of Saveur Magazine and wrote an editorial for Saveur Magazine while living in New York.

Before starting Salt Water Farm, she worked as a chef at Cook and Taste, a small, recreational cooking school in Barcelona.

Ahead of his 40th birthday, Ahearn was named one of “40 Big Food Thinkers 40 and Under” by FoodWine, for “changing the way America eats.” Ahearn opened Salt Water Farm CafeMarket in Rockport Harbor, Maine, in 2013, serving locally sourced fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Ahearn is also a contributing writer forDowneast Magazine, where she shares recipes from her school and regularly teaches high school students in her community cooking skills through a program she calls “Back to Basics.” Ahearn also volunteers as a cooking instructor for high school students in her community.

  • She began her studies at Colorado College, where she acquired an interest in food while living in Aix-en-Provence, where she studied Provincial cuisine and frequented the open-air markets.
  • Later, she worked as an apprentice in the kitchen at Le Jardin Notre Dame, a Parisian restaurant.
  • She worked in the editorial department of Saveur Magazine and wrote an editorial for Saveur Magazine while living in New York.
  • Before starting Salt Water Farm, she worked as a chef at Cook and Taste, a small, recreational cooking school in Barcelona.
  • Ahead of his 40th birthday, Ahearn was named one of “40 Big Food Thinkers 40 and Under” by FoodWine, for “changing the way America eats.” Ahearn opened Salt Water Farm CafeMarket in Rockport Harbor, Maine, in 2013, serving locally sourced fare for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
See also:  Refresh from the Inside Out: Spring Yoga, Ayurveda, Health Tips

Ahearn is also a contributing writer forDowneast Magazine, where she shares recipes from her school and regularly teaches high school students in her community cooking skills through a program she calls “Back to Basics.” Ahearn also volunteers as a cooking instructor for high school students in her community.

15 Black trailblazers who are changing the way we eat and drink in 2021

Featured image courtesy of Black Restaurant Week. Black professionals in the food and beverage industry are ready for their moment in the limelight. Many people have struggled over the last year, but if there’s one positive thing to come out of it, it’s the rise of fresh voices and talent in all corners of the world. Marginalized groups, notably those of African heritage, are at the top of the list of individuals who are discriminated against. Black food and beverage experts, backed by years of expertise, keen to express their culinary points of view, and devoted to elevating their communities via sustenance and economic empowerment, are poised to take their place in the limelight.

They’re craft beer fanatics who also happen to be cutting-edge vegan cooks.

In addition, they are astute, business-savvy collectives dedicated to boosting Black-owned restaurants on as many platforms as possible.

Audarshia Townsend is a food and beverage writer and editor located in Chicago, whose theawakening.substack.comnewsletter focuses on the restaurant and hospitality business.

Black culinary leaders to follow in 2021

Featured image courtesy of Black Restaurant Week Black professionals in the food and beverage industry are ready for their moment in the sun. Despite the fact that many people have had a rough year, if there is one positive thing that has come out of it, it is the emergence of fresh voices and talent in all corners of our society. Marginalized groups, notably those of African heritage, are at the top of the list of people who have experienced discrimination. Black food and beverage experts are ready for their moment in the limelight, armed with years of expertise, keen to voice their culinary points of view, and dedicated to elevating their communities via sustenance and economic empowerment.

Among their many passions are artisan beer and the preparation of unique vegan cuisine.

In addition, they are astute, business-savvy collectives dedicated to boosting Black-owned restaurants on as many platforms as possible.

Author and editor Audarshia Townsend writes on food and beverage topics for theawakening.substack.com, a newsletter that covers the restaurant sector. She lives in Chicago with her husband and two daughters. She may be found on Twitter at @iamaudarshia.

Looking for more ways to support?

  • Black culture and Black tastemakers are being celebrated in cities all throughout the United States this month, and we want you to join us. Despite the fact that it is Black History Month, this is a celebration of Black culture as it exists in the United States at the moment: In this issue, we’ll highlight the Black communities that rescued America, the Black food and beverage entrepreneurs who are altering the way we all eat, the Black-owned companies that are surviving a pandemic, and much, much more. An email that you’ll truly like reading With your submission, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policyand give your permission for Time Out to send you emails with information on news and events as well as offers and partner promotions. Congratulations, you have been subscribed! Thank you for signing up for our newsletter! In the near future, you will get your first newsletter through email. More information about Black History Month

Jamie Oliver: Is His Food Revolution Changing America’s Public Schools?

Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, and the prevalence of disorders that are directly tied to weight is on the increase as well. Attempting to address this issue, English chef Jamie Oliver has created his own version of “reality television,” which he is bringing into public school lunchrooms all around the United States in an attempt to change the way Americans view and eat foods from a young age. “Food Revolution,” a show hosted by Jamie Oliver, spent its first season in West Virginia schools, converting school meals and breakfasts into more nutritious options for students.

The Situation entails a conflict between two or more parties.

Instead, he was detained by police.

Administrators at the schools stated on a Wall Street Journal blog that they were hesitant to add any more drama on the Los Angeles school stage because of their prior unpleasant experiences with reality television shows.

“I do not feel that the school district should be used as a platform.and you and your organization have sought to turn the school district into a stage in recent weeks.” According to Robert Alaniz, director of media for the Los Angeles Unified School District, “Jamie considers himself to be a crusading journalist on the side of the oppressed.

We invite him to collaborate with our menu committee to see if we can make any improvements without the presence of cameras.

Megan Cherin, the chairman of the MLA Partner schools, consented to allow Oliver to work at one of the MLA schools, West Adams Preparatory School, as a substitute teacher.

Oliver accepted Cherin’s offer.

In his time at West Adams, Oliver was able to make a good difference in the lives of some of the youngsters that attend the establishment.

Villanueva told the Wall Street Journal that Oliver showed them that eating healthfully doesn’t have to be expensive.

“In actuality, anyone can eat healthfully with a little forethought – you don’t have to cook chicken in oil; you can roast it with herbs in the oven instead of frying it.

All you have to do is think outside the box.” West Virginia has had a lot of success.

After being hired, Oliver moved into Cabell County Schools in this state to overhaul the way pupils were served in school cafeterias throughout the county during his first season.

Many of the good modifications to school menus are still in effect today.

Huntington was not depicted in a bad light in the film.

I believe a large number of people in Huntington have altered their dietary habits.” Neely went on to say, “Jamie Oliver had a significant beneficial influence on the eating patterns of individuals in Huntington and throughout the United States once she arrived.

At an interview with Yum Sugar, Oliver explained that his ambition is far broader than merely revamping the menus in school cafeterias.

As Oliver put it, “I believe that every supermarket in the country, period, should sponsor a school, donating $20,000 to $30,000 per year to a worthy cause.

Is it something they can afford to do?

Is it instilling a desire in clients of the future?

It’s a win-win situation from an ethical standpoint.” With the popularity of his television show and an Emmy Award to his credit, it appears that Oliver’s healthy food crusade will be around for a while — at least for the time being.

Unfortunately, Oliver looks to have outstayed his welcome at the school districts that have been tasked with redesigning their present cafeterias and menus.

According to the blog Daily Dish of the Los Angeles Times, the new superintendent, John Deasy, is rethinking the decision taken by his predecessor, who is now in charge of the district. Questions? Alternatively, you may contact us on Twitter at @publicschoolreview.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *