7 Signs You’re Missing Some Key Vitamins

7 signs that show you are not getting enough nutrients

Monitoring calorie intake becomes second nature for those of us who pay attention to our eating habits as we attempt to perfect the art of weight control as we progress through our weight loss journey. We should never overlook the necessity of getting adequate nutrients in our diet, even though controlling calorie intake is undoubtedly one of the most essential parts of healthy eating to consider. After all, the nutrients we consume have a significant impact on the general health of our bodies and brains.

Photo courtesy of Active Health

The 7 signs of nutrient deficiency

Inadequate nutrient intake is one of the most evident symptoms that you aren’t receiving enough nutrients. The body’s repair and restoration processes are dependent on both macronutrients and micronutrients. If they are not there, the body will begin to break down its own reserves (catabolism) in order to get emergency fuel.

2. Fatigue

Fatigue and weakness on a regular basis are frequently signals that your body is low in iron, resulting in a disease known as anaemia, which may be life-threatening if untreated. It is also possible to have a magnesium deficit that causes exhaustion and leads to recurrent migraine attacks.

3. Weak and soft bones

It is possible to have weak bones if you are deficient in vitamin D or calcium, as these nutrients are crucial for building bone density in the body. Magnesium and calcium work together in a synergistic manner, so be sure you’re receiving enough of the former to maximize the absorption of the latter.

4. Slow healing of wounds

The fact that your wounds are taking longer to heal than usual may indicate that you have a zinc deficit. Skin wounds should heal in two to three weeks on average, with deeper and more serious wounds taking longer to heal.

5. Night blindness

If you’re experiencing night blindness, it’s possible that you’re suffering from a vitamin A deficiency, as one of the vitamin’s functions is to promote eye health. Other signs and symptoms include dry eyes, throat infections, and chest infections.

6. Impaired cognitive performance

When you don’t receive enough nutrition, your brain’s processes might be impaired, making it difficult to concentrate and recall new information. Iron or vitamin B12 deficiencies, for example, might cause delayed response times and/or erroneous recalls when the body is deficient in any of these nutrients.

7. Stunted growth and development issues

It is possible that an iodine deficit might result in thyroid-related disorders, which can lead to a variety of medical diseases, the most well-known of which is goitre (abnormally enlarged thyroid gland). The presence of other signs and symptoms such as hair loss, heart rate abnormalities, and heavy or irregular periods in women are also possible.

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It is hazardous to your health if you do not consume enough nutrients since it raises your chance of acquiring chronic health disorders, which are not always readily cured. Therefore, it is critical that you maintain a nutrient-dense diet during your pregnancy. One of the most straightforward strategies to make an immediate difference is to replace nutrient-deficient diet. Snack items such as chips and soda are among the most common offenders in this category. Substituting nutrient-dense foods such as baked sweet potato fries and coconut water for processed meals gives your body more nutrients while also making it simpler to prevent overindulging, since these foods are more satiating in nature.

Check for any underlying medical concerns that may have contributed to the malnutrition, since these should be addressed first before moving on to the next step.

You need to learn how to eat more nutritiously if your nutritional insufficiency is solely the product of your bad eating habits. Although you may not be suffering any signs of vitamin shortage at the moment, it is still a good idea to begin increasing your nutrient intake as soon as possible.

Address the nutrient deficiency

It is critical to first restore whatever it is that your body is lacking, depending on the sort of nutritional shortage you are having (if any). Food supplements may be used to augment a well-planned and balanced diet, which can be further enhanced by taking vitamins and minerals in addition to your regular diet. Consult with a dietitian or other health professional before making any dietary changes to ensure that you are doing the correct thing for your health. Visit one of our Active Health Labs, which are situated around the island, to speak with one of our Active Health Coaches.

Eat the rainbow (fruits and vegetables)

Fruits and vegetables provide a slew of nutrients with each mouthful, so include them in as many of your meals as possible is a wise decision. In addition to beginning with green foods, experiment with foods that are different tints and colors such as blue, purple, yellow, and red to see what works best for you. Here’s a hint: the darker the color, the higher the nutritional density of the food!

Keep track of your nutritional intake

Keeping track of your food consumption is a foolproof technique to guarantee that you are getting enough nutrients to satisfy your nutritional needs. A food diary is the most straightforward method of accomplishing this — you can quickly scribble down your daily meals and record the number of calories, as well as the kind and amount of nutrients, in one convenient place. As long as you are honest with yourself about what you are putting down, this hack will make it much simpler to stick to your dietary objectives.

It all starts with choosing the correct nutrient-dense foods to include in your daily meals – here is a list of some of the most nutrient-dense foods that you should consider include in your daily meals.

The best food for getting more nutrients

This fatty fish is often regarded as one of the healthiest delicacies ever to have graced our shores, owing in large part to the high omega-3 level of the fish itself. Your cardiovascular health will benefit greatly from the use of omega-3 fatty acids, which will also lower your chance of acquiring chronic conditions. Weekly salmon consumption is unquestionably an excellent strategy to increase your nutritional intake!

Shellfish

It is almost universally recognized as one of the healthiest delicacies ever to have graced our shores, owing in large part to the rich omega-3 concentration of this fatty fish. In terms of cardiovascular health, omega-3 fatty acids are quite beneficial and can lower your chance of acquiring chronic conditions. Weekly salmon consumption is unquestionably an excellent approach to improve your nutritional intake.

Liver

Although the concept of eating organ meat may be distasteful to some, there is no denying the numerous health advantages that may be obtained from doing so.

The liver, in particular, is nutrient-dense, containing high concentrations of numerous vitamins, including B vitamins and vitamin A, as well as minerals like copper and iron. Say “yes” to dishes like kidney pie and liver broth!

Seaweed

The fact that seaweed is one of the most nutritious vegetables available should serve as an excellent justification for eating more sushi. Seaweed is high in minerals, has a large number of anti-inflammatory antioxidants, and is also high in iodine, which helps to regulate thyroid hormone production and function.

Kale

The fiber and vitamin C content of all leafy green vegetables is high, but kale is one of the highest-quality sources of these nutrients. A single serving of kale contains a significant amount of vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin K1, as well as fiber and protein. In addition to being high in nutrients, kale is also low in calories, making it an excellent addition to your diet if you are limiting your calorie intake.

Garlic

We should be grateful that Singaporeans like using garlic in their cuisine because garlic is a rich source of vitamins and minerals. Apart from providing a wide range of necessary vitamins and minerals, it also includes sulphur compounds, which assist to manage blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Potatoes

Potatoes are not only delicious and filling, but they are also a wonderful source of vitamin C, B vitamins, and a variety of minerals such as potassium, magnesium, and manganese, among others. Keep in mind that the way by which you cook them will have an effect on their GI value: boiling maintains it low, but baking or frying raises it dramatically.

Blueberries

Despite the fact that all fruits are abundant in vitamin and mineral content, blueberries contain much more anti-oxidants than other fruits. Blueberries are also a fantastic brain food, and it has been shown that they can help boost memory in elderly persons.

Egg yolks

Egg yolks are sometimes vilified as being harmful because of their high cholesterol level, but the fact is that they are packed with nutrients and therefore deserve to be included in your diet. Aside from that, dietary cholesterol has only a little impact on blood cholesterol levels in otherwise healthy individuals. Lutein and zeaxanthin are two of the minerals contained in egg yolks, and both of these elements are beneficial to eye health. As a bonus, eggs are a fantastic source of protein and, best of all, they are a delicious complement to any meal.

Dark chocolate

Treating yourself to dessert is not always a terrible idea, especially when it comes to dark chocolate. Dark chocolate contains a high concentration of fiber as well as vital elements such as copper, magnesium, and iron. As an added bonus, dark chocolate is high in antioxidants, making it an excellent addition to your diet. Don’t forget to keep your serving sizes fair. Aside from simply choosing the correct sorts of nutritious meals, it is also necessary to maintain good eating habits.

Healthy eating habits to live by

Despite the fact that you may be eating all of the proper sorts of meats and vegetables, you will not be receiving enough nutrients if you are always consuming preserved or microwaved foods. It is critical to choose entire foods that contain the least number of additives possible, as well as to ensure that you are purchasing the freshest produce available in the market.

When it comes to picking sauces or condiments, the majority of store-bought goods include preservatives and artificial colors, which should be avoided. Instead, experiment with making your own sauces or using natural herbs and spices to flavor your food.

Don’t skip meals before working out

The concept of skipping meals before or after exercises in order to burn more fat and reduce weight may sound appealing, but doing so means denying your body the necessary nutrients it requires to propel you through your workout and help you recover afterwards. If you engage in physical activity, you may find that you need to consume more calories in order to maintain your health. The more intensive and demanding the exercise, the greater the amount of time your body will require to recover from it.

Be creative with your meals

Eating the same thing over and over again can get tedious and discouraging, making it difficult to remain on track. There is no reason why healthy eating has to be bland and monotonous! There are a plethora of recipes available that promote mindful eating habits as well as the consumption of foods that are high in nutrients. Healthy eating can be enjoyable and delicious as well, so get creative with your recipes and help yourself fall in love with healthy food! Photo courtesy of Active Health It is important to recognize that nutrient shortages are a major concern that should not be overlooked.

Before you decide on a meal, always ask yourself this question: does the food supply my body with what it genuinely requires, or am I simply satisfying my desire with it?

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Topics:Nutrition

12 Easy-to-Spot Signs You May Be Deficient in Necessary Vitamins

As cliche as it may seem, life is simply really hectic for everyone. For the sake of avoiding the never-ending sense that there aren’t enough hours in the day, we attempt to optimize our time and get the most out of each day by taking shortcuts wherever and wherever we can. Cooking nutritious and vitamin-rich meals might sometimes take a backseat to other priorities. Because convenience is king, there has been a rise in processed foods and on-the-go meals, and vitamin inadequacies are something to be cautious of.

  1. Carrie Lam of Lam Coaching, which is situated in California.
  2. Consider it to be a transitional state between fitness and illness.” So, how can you determine whether or not you are deficient in important vitamins and minerals?
  3. It’s critical to pay attention to your body and be aware of any changes so that you can report them to your doctor as soon as possible.
  4. Stress can even aggravate the deficiencies itself.
  5. As a result, your mental health and well-being are equally as vital as your physical health and well-being.

Lam, “When your body is under chronic stress and has a never-ending to-do list, it continues to release adrenaline and cortisol chemicals into your circulation in order to counteract the stress.” It is possible that this will cause a disruption in your NeuroEndoMetabolic Stress Response System, which will cause your body to experience Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome.

Eating a diet rich in vitamins and minerals derived from whole foods not only improves your mood, but it also provides your body with the vigor and stamina it requires to reduce your chance of developing a wide range of health concerns in the long term.

Continue reading for a list of typical symptoms that can occur as a result of vitamin deficiencies. 01 out of 12

Fatigue

Fatigue is a frequent and early symptom of any vitamin deficiency, but it is often ignored as a symptom of living a hectic lifestyle and is not treated as such. Dehydration manifests itself initially in the form of fatigue, so make sure you’re providing your body with lots of fluids. If your fatigue is unrelenting and you are unable to find relief even after several good nights’ sleep, it is possible that you are nutritionally deficient in a few nutrients. Doctor Susan Mitmesser, Vice President of Science and Technology for nurish by Nature Made, explains that “almost all nutritional deficiencies are linked to weariness.” “The nutrient deficiencies that have the greatest impact are the cellular energy minerals iron, vitamin B12, and magnesium,” she continues.

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02 out of 12

Fatigue. Again.

Iron is extremely important for your general health, and it is especially important for pregnant or menstrual women. According to Elizabeth Somer, MA, RD, a member of Persona Nutrition’s medical advisory board, “Iron is a crucial component of red blood cells because it helps them transport oxygen to all the tissues in the body.” As stated by the American Heart Association, “abnormally low iron intake deprives the muscles, organs and brain of oxygen and may result in anemia, weariness, weakness and poor focus.” The good news is that This is a simple one that you can keep an eye on.

Make sure you ask your doctor for a Serum Ferritin test during your next blood panel, since this can diagnose iron deficiency before it progresses to anemia.

General Aches and Pains

Muscle discomfort, which is frequently misdiagnosed as a sign of natural aging or even as an exercise-related complaint, is actually an indication of vitamin D and magnesium deficiency, respectively. Doctor Mitmesser explains that low magnesium levels are frequently related with muscular stiffness, tightness, and cramping, while low Vitamin D levels are frequently connected with muscle weakening, muscle soreness, and bone pain. In addition to dietary supplements, vitamin D and the mineral magnesium are available in the form of pills and tinctures.

Changes in Mood

Sure, everyone has a bad day every now and then, but it’s critical to ensure that you’re getting enough of the vital nutrients that promote brain health and emotional well-being. You should boost your intake of omega-3 fatty acids if you’re experiencing depression. Fatty fish (such as salmon and sardines) and algae are both good sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are necessary for regular brain function and cell communication. 05 out of 12

Changes in Hair Texture

A change in the appearance and texture of your hair may indicate that you are not receiving enough folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, and/or iron in your diet.

These nutrients contribute to the maintenance of a healthy blood supply, which transports oxygen to the hair and scalp. “A low intake of nutrients might result in diminished or brittle red blood cells, which can suffocate the hair and scalp,” explains Somer. 06th day of the 12th month

Changes in Eyesight

It is possible to have vision problems as a result of a diet that is deficient in vitamins C and E, as well as two antioxidants called lutein and zeaxanthin. Many researchers believe that our eyes’ lenses filter ultraviolet light, which is a major generator of highly reactive molecules known as free radicals. “The lens of each eye filters ultraviolet light,” adds Somer. According to the National Institutes of Health, lutein and zeaxanthin work as internal sunglasses, protecting the deeper layers of the eyes from harm.

07th day of the 12th month

Bleeding Gums

If you have an unusually large amount of bleeding gums or aggressive gingivitis, you may need to boost your Vitamin C consumption to combat the condition. Dr. Gerry Curtola, DDS, a New York-based dentist, recommends that you supplement your diet with a minimum of 2000mg of vitamin C each day by consuming vegetables such as broccoli, cantelope, cauliflower, kale, kiwi, papaya, and strawberries, among other things. 08th day of the 12th month

Jaw Pain

Anyone acquainted with the pain and suffering associated with TMJ? The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a sliding hinge that links your jawbone to the rest of your body. Jaw discomfort, clicking and locking, and trouble chewing are all signs and symptoms of TMJ disorder. Dr. Curtola believes that this might be a symptom that you’re weak in magnesium in addition to calcium in your system. In his opinion, supplementing with magnesium malate is the best option. In my experience, daily dosages of up to 2,500mg have had beneficial results.

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Prickling Sensation in Fingers or Toes

You may be lacking in vitamin B12, which is fondly known as the “energy vitamin,” if you have prickling feelings that are accompanied by sadness, weakness, or even weariness. Because it is largely present in animal products such as meat, dairy, and eggs, people who follow a plant-based diet may be more at risk for developing this form of deficit. “A multivitamin and/or B complex that includes B12 is generally the first advice for treating a B12 deficiency,” says Brittany Michels, MS RDN LDN, The Vitamin Shoppe Wellness Council Expert and member of the Vitamin Shoppe Wellness Council.

Dry Skin or Eyes

If you’re seeing that your skin is becoming drier and that your eyes are becoming dry and unable to produce tears, it’s possible that you have a vitamin A shortage on your hands. “Difficulty seeing in dim light (also known as night blindness) is another difficulty,” says Dr. Peterson Pierre, MD, a cosmetic dermatologist in California who specializes in skin cancer treatment. He recommends including red, yellow, orange, and green plant items in your diet, as well as meats, dairy products, and eggs.

Muscle Spasms

Increasing your calcium intake may be necessary if you’re having muscular cramps, as well as weariness, numbness and tingling in and around your arms, legs, and feet, as well as around your mouth. According to Dr. Michael A. Smith, Director of Education at Life Extension, “calcium is required for muscle contraction, blood vessel function, and the production of hormones and enzymes.” The National Institutes of Health recommends that people who are deficient in calcium consume 1000 mg per day if they are under 50 and 1,200 mg per day if they are over 50.

Make sure to take calcium supplements in addition to vitamin D and K for improved calcium absorption and a more even distribution of calcium throughout the body. 12 out of 12

Excessive Bleeding

Increasing your calcium intake may be necessary if you’re having muscular cramps, as well as exhaustion, numbness and tingling in or around the arms, legs, and feet, as well as in the mouth. Life Extension’s Dr. Michael A. Smith, Director of Education, explains that calcium is required for muscular contraction, blood vessel function, and the production of hormones and enzymes. The National Institutes of Health recommends that people who are deficient in calcium consume 1000 mg per day if they are under 50 and 1,200 mg per day if they are over 50 years of age.

12 out of 12 based on a total of 12

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  6. Long S-J, Benton D. EXCLI J. 2017
  7. Long S-J, Benton D. A meta-analysis evaluating the effects of vitamin and mineral supplementation on stress, minor mental symptoms, and mood in nonclinical samples was conducted in 2009. As previously stated in Psychosom Med. 2013
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  9. Nowak A, Boesch L, Andres E, et al. An investigation of the effects of vitamin D3 on self-perceived weariness Pross N, Demazières A, Girard N, et al. Medicine (Baltimore) 2016
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  11. Pross N, Demazières A, Girard N, et al. The effects of gradual fluid restriction on women’s mood and physiological indicators of dehydration were investigated in this study. Low MSY, Speedy J, Styles CE, De-Regil LM, Pasricha S-R
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  14. Low MSY, Speedy J, Styles CE, De-Regil LM, Pasricha S-R. Menstruating women should take daily iron supplements to improve their anaemia, iron status, and overall health. The Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016
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  19. Dyall SC Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and the brain: a review of the effects of EPA, DPA, and DHA on their respective and combined functions. Guo EL, Katta R, et al., Front Aging Neurosci. 2015
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  21. Guo EL, Katta R. Effects of nutritional shortage and supplement usage on hair loss in relation to diet. 1-10 in Dermatol Pract Concept, Volume 7, Number 1, 2017. S. Buscemi, D. Corleo, F. Di Pace, M. Petroni, A. Satriano, G. Marchesini, et al. The influence of lutein on the health of the eyes and the rest of the body. 10(9):1321 in Nutrients (2018 September). G. Rizzo, A. Laganà, A. Rapisarda, and colleagues Vitamin B12 status, evaluation, and supplementation in vegetarians are discussed. Nutrients. 2016
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7 Common Nutrient Deficiencies

According to the National Institutes of Health, calcium is essential for the maintenance of healthy bones as well as the regulation of muscle and nerve function (NIH). According to the Cleveland Clinic, signs of severe calcium deficiency include numb, tingling fingers, and irregular heart rhythms, among others. Having said that, there are no immediate or evident signs or symptoms of calcium shortage. According to the Mayo Clinic, the average adult requires 1,000 milligrams (mg) of calcium per day, with women over 50 and men over 70 requiring 1,200 mg.

According to the National Institutes of Health, calcium can be found in calcium-fortified orange juice and breakfast cereal (check the nutrition facts label of the food to see if calcium has been added), as well as dark leafy greens such as kale and broccoli, as well as a variety of fruits and vegetables.

2. Vitamin D: Fatigue, Bone Pain, Mood Shifts, and More

As with vitamin D, according to the Cleveland Clinic, this vitamin is essential for bone health and may also help to prevent some malignancies. The signs and symptoms of a vitamin D deficiency might be unclear, but they include weariness, bone discomfort, mood changes, and muscular pains and weakness. “If left untreated, a vitamin D deficiency can result in the weakening of the bones,” Psota explains. According to Michelle Zive, a NASM-certified nutrition coach located in San Diego, long-term insufficiency may also be associated with cancer and autoimmune illnesses, among other things.

To get enough vitamin D, Dr.

He also recommends spending some time outside in the sunshine every day, as this is a fantastic source of the mineral.

OTHER RELATED INFORMATION:10 Illnesses Associated with Vitamin D Deficiency

3. Potassium: Muscle Weakness, Constipation, Irregular Heart Rhythm, and More

In accordance with MedlinePlus, potassium helps your heart, nerves, and muscles function properly, as well as delivering nutrients to cells and eliminating waste from them. Furthermore, it is a beneficial vitamin that can assist to counteract the detrimental effects of salt on your blood pressure: As Zive explains, “it’s critical in keeping a good blood pressure.” In the short term, you might be deficient in potassium due to diarrhea or vomiting; excessive sweating; antibiotics, laxatives, or diuretics; excessive alcohol intake; and in the long term, you could be deficient in potassium due to renal disease or another chronic illness.

According to MedlinePlus, symptoms of a deficit include muscular weakness, twitches, or cramps; constipation; tingling and numbness; an irregular heart rhythm or palpitations; and an abnormal heart rhythm or palpitations.

Bananas, milk, acorn squash, lentils, kidney beans, and other legumes are all good sources of potassium that are naturally occurring. According to the National Institutes of Health, adult men require 3,400 mg per day while adult women require 2,600 mg.

4. Iron: Fatigue, Shortness of Breath, Cold Hands and Feet, Brittle Nails, and More

According to the University of California at San Francisco, iron is required for the production of red blood cells, which are responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. When iron levels go too low, there may be a lack in red blood cells, leading in anemia, which is a serious disorder that requires treatment. Menstruating women, developing persons (such as youngsters and pregnant women), and those who consume a vegan or vegetarian diet, according to Zive, are among those who are at greater risk of iron deficiency than other people.

If you have anemia, consult your doctor immediately.

The iron-fortified cereals, steak, oysters, beans (particularly lima, navy and kidney beans), lentils, and spinach are some of the foods Patton suggests for increasing iron levels.

IN CONNECTION WITH: Iron-Packed Foods for Fighting Anemia and Low Energy

5. Vitamin B12: Numbness, Fatigue, Swollen Tongue, and More

According to the National Institutes of Health, vitamin B12 assists in the creation of red blood cells and DNA, as well as the operation of neurotransmitters. According to Harvard Health Publishing, vegetarians and vegans may be particularly at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency because plants do not produce the nutrient. People who have undergone weight loss surgery may also be at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency because the procedure makes it difficult for the body to extract the nutrient from food sources.

This group of symptoms can manifest themselves suddenly or gradually, and because there is such a wide variety of symptoms, you may not notice them for a long time.

In animal products, it’s most typically found, and Patton suggests boosting your B12 levels by eating fish, poultry, milk, and yogurt.

According to the National Institutes of Health, you can also get B12 in most multivitamins, but if you’re at danger of becoming deficient, you should consider taking a B12 supplement particularly designed for this purpose. 8 Surprising Benefits of B Vitamins for Your Health (Related)

6. Folate: Fatigue, Diarrhea, Smooth Tongue, and More

Folate, also known as folic acid, is a B vitamin that is especially vital for women of reproductive age, which is why prenatal vitamins often include a high concentration of it. According to the Mayo Clinic, folate promotes healthy growth and function, as well as lowering the chance of birth abnormalities, particularly those involving the neural tube and the reproductive organs (the brain and spine). According to Psota, a folate shortage can result in a reduction in the total number of cells and big red blood cells in an unborn kid, as well as neural tube problems in the child.

See also:  A Vegetarian Meal Plan for Optimal Wellness from Root & Nourish

Folate deficiency can also cause anemia.

According to the Harvard T.H.

Fortified cereals, beans, peanuts, sunflower seeds, whole grains, eggs, and dark leafy greens are some of the best sources of folate found in food.

7. Magnesium: Loss of Appetite, Nausea, Fatigue, and More

In addition to supporting bone health and assisting in energy generation, individuals require between 310 and 420 mg of magnesium per day, depending on their gender and age, according to the National Institutes of Health. Although magnesium insufficiency is uncommon in generally healthy persons, some drugs (such as certain antibiotics and diuretics) and medical disorders (such as type 2 diabetes and Crohn’s disease) can impair magnesium absorption or cause it to be excreted from the body in greater quantities.

Aside from numbness and tingling, it can also cause muscle cramping or contractures, seizures, abnormal heart rhythms, personality changes and coronary spasms in more severe examples of the condition.

CONNECTED: What Are the Health Benefits of Magnesium Supplementation?

From Nutrient Deficiency to Healthy Eating

If you believe you may be suffering from a nutritional deficit, consult your doctor. ” Blood testing can assist in determining whether or not you are deficient,” Patton explains. Moreover, if you are overweight, your doctor might send you to a qualified nutritionist or prescribe vitamins for you. A well-balanced diet that is high in nutrients is the most effective strategy to prevent or treat nutritional deficiencies, according to Patton’s research findings. While she advises prioritizing food over supplements, she notes that if you are at heightened risk of nutritional insufficiency, you may benefit from taking a multivitamin supplement as well.

If you have any doubts regarding your risk, you should consult with your doctor right away.

Signs You’re Not Getting Enough Nutrients

THESE IMAGES WERE PROVIDED BY:

  1. Getty Images
  2. Getty Images
  3. G

SOURCES: Rush “6 Signs of Nutrient Deficiency,” according to the University Medical Center. “Diet and hair loss: Effects of vitamin insufficiency and supplement usage,” according to the National Institutes of Health. “Foods to Fight Iron Deficiency,” according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “What Are B-Vitamins?” you might wonder. “Burning mouth syndrome,” according to the Mayo Clinic. “Hemochromatosis,” “Fingernails: Possible problems,” and “Hemodialysis.” “Vitamin A,” according to the University of Rochester Medical Center.

  1. “Nail Abnormalities: Clues to Systemic Disease,” according to the American Family Physician.
  2. “Angular Cheilitis: The Cold Sore That Isn’t Really a Cold Sore,” according to Dignity Health.
  3. “Riboflavin,” “Vitamin B12,” and “Vitamin A,” according to the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements.
  4. “The Most Effective Way to Increase Collagen,” according to the Cleveland Clinic.
  5. “Vitamin C,” according to the National Institutes of Health.

Nutrition and Aging: 7 Signs of Inadequate Nutrition

SOURCES: Rush “6 Signs of Nutrient Deficiency,” according to the University Medical Center in Philadelphia. “Diet and hair loss: Effects of nutritional shortage and supplement usage,” National Institutes of Health, Washington, D.C. “Foods to Fight Iron Deficiency,” published by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. How Do B-Vitamins Help You?” “Burning mouth syndrome,” according to the Mayo Clinic’s website. Among the topics covered are “Fingernails: Potential Problems,” and “Hemochromatosis.” “Vitamin A” is a term coined by the researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center.

“Nail Abnormalities: Clues to Systemic Disease,” according to the American Family Physician (AAFP).

“Angular Cheilitis” is a term coined by the College of Dental Hygienists of Ontario.

“The Most Effective Way to Increase Collagen.” Cleveland Clinic.

“4 Ways Collagen Can Improve Your Health From Head to Toe,” according to Penn Medicine. Scurvy is defined as follows by the National Health Service: Vitamin C, according to the National Institutes of Health. Nutritional Aspects of Vitamin A (Harvard School of Public Health)

1. Unexplained Fatigue

SOURCES: Rush “6 Signs of Nutrient Deficiency,” University Medical Center. “Diet and hair loss: Effects of nutritional deficit and supplement usage,” National Institutes of Health. “Foods to Fight Iron Deficiency,” from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “What Exactly Are B-Vitamins?” “Burning Mouth Syndrome,” according to the Mayo Clinic. Among the topics covered are “Fingernails: Possible Problems,” and “Hemochromatosis.” “Vitamin A” is a term coined by the University of Rochester Medical Center.

  1. “Nail Abnormalities: Clues to Systemic Disease,” American Family Physician.
  2. “Angular Cheilitis: The Cold Sore That Isn’t.” Dignity Health: “Angular Cheilitis: The Cold Sore That Isn’t.” “Angular Cheilitis,” according to the Ontario College of Dental Hygienists.
  3. “Finding Folate,” “Easy Bruising,” and other topics covered by Beth Israel Lahey Health and Winchester Hospital.
  4. Penn Medicine published an article titled “4 Head-to-Toe Ways Collagen Can Improve Your Health.” Scurvy, according to the National Health Service.
  5. Vitamin A, according to the Harvard School of Public Health.

2. Brittle and Dry Hair

Hair, which is mostly composed of protein, can be used as a diagnostic marker to detect nutritional inadequacies in patients. “When an older person’s hair appears brittle, dry, and sparse, it’s often a sign that their diet is inadequate,” says Kathleen Niedert, RD, director of clinical nutrition and dining services for Western Home Communities in Iowa. “When an older person’s hair appears brittle, dry, and sparse, it’s often a sign that their diet is inadequate.” Fibrous hair can indicate a deficiency in vital fatty acids as well as in protein, iron, and other minerals.

However, if hair begins to fall out at an unusually rapid rate, it is possible that vitamin inadequacies are to blame.

3. Ridged or Spoon-Shaped Nails

Nails, like hair, can serve as an early warning sign of malnutrition if left untreated. A spoon-shaped nail, in which the nail curves upward from the nail bed in the shape of a spoon (a condition known as koilonychia), can be an indicator of iron-deficiency anemia, according to the National Institutes of Health. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may advise you to take iron supplements as well as eat iron-rich foods such as liver and shellfish such as clams, oysters, and mussels, among other things.

4. Mouth Problems

Angular cheilitis is a disorder in which there is cracking or inflammation around the corners of the mouth. It is a warning sign of either riboflavin (B2) inadequacy or iron deficiency. A tongue that is particularly pale or swollen is a warning sign of iron or B-vitamin insufficiency, respectively. When iron, zinc, or B-vitamin levels fall below the recommended levels, a disease known as burning mouth syndrome can develop.

This ailment continues to confound researchers to this day. After again, once you’ve identified and validated your specific nutritional deficiencies, you may remedy them with nutrient-dense meals and nutritional supplements.

5. Diarrhea

Chronic diarrhea can be a symptom of malabsorption, which implies that nutrients are not being properly absorbed by the body’s cells. Infections, surgeries, certain medications, excessive alcohol use, and digestive illnesses such as celiac sprue and Crohn’s disease can all cause malabsorption to occur. If you are experiencing persistent diarrhea, it is critical that you see a doctor very once.

6. Apathy or Irritability

Unexplained mood swings, particularly feelings of apathy or irritability, might be signs of a serious mental disease such as depression. However, they might also be signs that your body isn’t getting the amount of energy it requires. If you’re experiencing prolonged poor mood or forgetfulness, it’s crucial to see your doctor to be checked out.

7. Lack of Appetite

Appetite is typically reduced as we get older. Taste buds become less sensitive with time. Because elderly are less active than younger people, they require less calories. Medication can also have a depressing effect on appetite. According to Nancy Wellman, RD, past president of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, “chronic lack of appetite is a severe warning indicator that you may be at danger of nutritional inadequacies.” If you find yourself skipping meals because you aren’t hungry, speak with your doctor about your situation.

Nutritional deficiencies can be identified by a certified dietitian through an assessment of your dietary consumption.

You’ll be able to prevent nutritional issues before they become a significant problem.

8 Silent Signs You’ve Got a Vitamin Deficiency

Appetite is frequently reduced as we get older. Eventually, the taste receptors become insensitive to flavors. A senior’s calorie need is reduced as a result of their reduced physical activity. In addition, several medications might reduce appetite. According to Nancy Wellman, RD, past president of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, “chronic lack of appetite is a severe warning indicator that you may be at danger for nutritional inadequacies.” Discuss this with your doctor if you find yourself skipping meals because you aren’t hungry.

A certified dietician can detect nutritional inadequacies in you by evaluating your food consumption.

Nutritional disorders can be avoided if caught early enough before they become severe.

Your nails are brittle

Appetite is frequently reduced as we get older. Taste buds become less sensitive. Seniors tend to be less active than younger people, therefore they require less calories. Medications can also have a depressing effect on hunger. According to Nancy Wellman, RD, past president of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, “chronic loss of appetite is a severe warning indicator that you may be at danger of nutritional inadequacies.” If you find yourself skipping meals because you aren’t hungry, speak with your doctor about your options.

A licensed dietician can detect nutritional deficits in you by examining your food consumption.

As Wellman points out, “the most essential thing is to notify your doctor as soon as your appetite changes or you begin missing meals.” You will be able to prevent nutritional disorders before they become a significant problem.

Your blood pressure is too high

The possibility of vitamin D insufficiency should be considered. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, whereas just 3 percent of non-Hispanic whites are vitamin D deficient, 31 percent of non-Hispanic blacks and 12 percent of Mexican-Americans are, according to the research. Several studies have connected low vitamin D levels to high blood pressure — while it is unclear if taking the vitamin might assist with hypertension once it has been diagnosed in some cases. The solution is as follows: According to the National Institutes of Health, adults require 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D per day.

Swordfish, salmon, fortified milk and orange juice, and mushrooms produced in sunshine or ultraviolet radiation are just a few of the foods that meet this need.

istock/Jan-Otto

Your leg muscles are cramping

Your body need the electrolyte potassium in order for your muscles to contract properly. If your magnesium levels drop, you may have muscle cramping, which is most common in the calf area. Low dietary potassium intake is only seldom the cause of potassium shortage; rather, excessive perspiration, diarrhea, vomiting, and bodily fluid loss serve as the more common reasons. Here are some of the additional indicators that you may be suffering from a potassium deficit. The solution is as follows: Women require 2,600 mg per day, while males require 3,400 mg per day.

Additionally, try these other meals that are high in potassium.

You’re feeling tired

While scurvy, or vitamin C insufficiency, may conjure up images of 18th-century sailors, low intake of the immunity-boosting mineral is observed in a number of populations, including smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke. Studies have found that smokers are at increased risk of developing vitamin C insufficiency by more than 30 percent than nonsmokers. Feeling fatigued all of the time and being irritable are signals that you may be deficient in vitamin C; nevertheless, don’t dismiss these additional signs that you may be deficient in vitamin C.

Among the best sources are citrus fruits such as oranges and grapefruits, kiwi fruit such as pineapple and kiwi and tomatoes such as spinach and bell peppers, and broccoli.

Your thyroid hormone production has dipped

This could only be determined definitively by laboratory testing, and low levels may be associated with a reduced consumption of the mineral iodine. Extremely low iodine levels, which are uncommon in the United States, have been linked to decreased thyroid hormone synthesis, which can result in hypothyroidism. Low iodine consumption is especially concerning for pregnant women, since it has been linked to miscarriage and a variety of other complications. According to the CDC data, women of reproductive age had iodine levels that were barely above iodine deficiency on average.

According to the National Institutes of Health, most individuals require 150 mcg daily, but pregnant women require more (220 mcg).

If you cook with salt or add salt to your cuisine, use iodized salt over other types of salt such as sea salt or table salt. Iodine can also be found in seafood and dairy products. istock/Halfpoint

You’ve had several recent fractures

When you have a calcium deficit, you put yourself at risk for osteopenia, a disease that produces low bone mass and increases the likelihood of developing osteoporosis and breaking a bone. Bones achieve their maximum strength around the age of 30—at which time they begin to lose density gradually. This is why it is critical to consume enough levels of calcium, as well as engage in weight-bearing activities such as walking and aerobic exercise. Don’t ignore these telltale indicators that you aren’t receiving enough calcium.

See also:  The Importance of Slow-Flow Yoga in a Fast-Paced World

Dairy products (yogurt, milk, and cheese), as well as fortified foods, are the finest sources of calcium in the diet (tofu and fortified juice).

If you decide to take a supplement, divide it into two doses and take each with a meal as directed.

You have cracking at the corners of your mouth

It is possible to develop osteopenia, a disease that produces low bone mass and increases the chance of developing osteoporosis or breaking a bone, if you do not get enough calcium in your diet. By the time we reach the age of 30, our bones have reached their maximum strength, and then they begin to lose density steadily. The importance of adequate calcium intake, as well as weight-bearing activities such as walking and aerobics, cannot be overstated. If you are not receiving enough calcium, pay attention to these warning signals.

As recommended by the National Institutes of Health, males and premenopausal women need 1,000 mg of vitamin D daily, while postmenopausal women need 1,200 mg.

The calcium in some leafy greens (collard greens, turnip greens, kale) is difficult for your body to absorb, but it is still beneficial.

istock/simarik

  • “Second National Report on Biochemical Indicators of Diet and Nutrition in the United States Population,” published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vitamin D and Hypertension is a fact sheet published by the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements. Other fact sheets published by the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements include “IronFact Sheet for Health Professionals.”, “Vitamin DFact Sheet for Health Professionals.,” and “Vitamin D and Hypertension.” Vitamin B12Fact Sheet for Health Professionals from the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements
  • Potassium Fact Sheet for Health Professionals from the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements
  • And American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: “Serum vitamin C and the prevalence of vitamin C deficiency in the United States from the 2003–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).” “Vitamin CFact Sheet for Health Professionals,” published by the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements. “Iodine Fact Sheet for Health Professionals,” published by the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements. Vitamin B6Fact Sheet for Health Professionals, from the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements.
  • Calcium Fact Sheet for Health Professionals, from the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements.

Maureen Namkoong, MS, RD, evaluated this article on October 20, 2019Originally published on July 16, 2018 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

7 Silent Signs Your Hair Is Desperate for Certain Nutrients

If you’re deficient in certain vitamins, your health—and especially your hair—may suffer as a consequence. It’s possible that distinct hair concerns such as shedding and a dry scalp are caused by certain nutrients that aren’t getting enough of. Here’s what you need to know to keep your hair in good condition. Photograph by Wong Sze Fei / EyeEm/Getty Images.

Your hair is shedding like crazy

Have you ever had a shower and been surprised by the amount of hair that accumulated in the drain? The loss of a few strands after washing (up to 100 per day) is normal for healthy hair, but excessive shedding could indicate something else is going on. (It is usual for women to shed hair after giving birth, and this is natural.) Paradi Mirmirani, MD, dermatologist and regional director of hair disorders at Kaiser Permanente in Vallejo, California, adds that nutritional deficiencies, as well as other underlying medical conditions, might be at the root of the problem, and that a visit to your doctor is highly suggested.

Here are seven things you should be aware of.) Photograph by Letizia Le Fur/Getty Images

Your hair is dry

If your hair is constantly dry, healthy fats may be the answer, according to Megan Faletra, MS, MPH, RDN, a global health consultant and dietitian who works in the field of nutrition. Because they promote healthy skin and a healthy scalp, which in turn gives life to your strands, these are essential components of your diet. “Consider how you may improve the health of your hair by include an abundance of good fats such as avocado, olive oil, and salmon in your diet, which will benefit your skin and scalp as well.” (Check out these 13 home-made solutions for extremely dry hair.) Getty Images/Francesca Dagrada via EyeEm/Getty Images

Your hair looks dull

Whether it’s because you missed your touch-up appointment with your colorist or because of the cold weather that fosters hat hair, you could notice that your hair is less lustrous when you look in the mirror. Kaleigh McMordie, MCN, RDN, LD, explains that dull-looking hair that lacks vibrancy might be a sign that you need to consume more healthy fats to give shine and body to your hair. “Omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats are essential for general health, but dull hair may be a symptom that you aren’t receiving enough of them.

Wacharaphorn Phetpradub / EyeEm/Getty Images Wacharaphorn Phetpradub / EyeEm/Getty Images

Your hair is brittle

The last thing you should do when your hair is drying post-shower and you’re dashing around ticking off to-do list things is to accidentally tuck a strand behind your ear and hear it crunch. Tania Dempsey, MD of Armonk Integrative Medicine says that while everyone’s locks require a little moisture from time to time, a particularly brittle texture might be an indication of a zinc and/or iron deficiency, according to her. “Because zinc and iron are required for keratin formation, a deficiency in any of these elements might cause alterations in the structure of hair,” she notes.

Adding zinc-rich foods to your diet, such as beef, pumpkin seeds, and lentils, will help you feel better overall.” (Check out these 19 homemade hair masks for beautiful, healthy hair.) Image courtesy of Ruletka/Getty Images

Your scalp is dry

If you find yourself fighting the want to scratch an itch in the middle of an important meeting because your scalp is so dry, you are not alone. Or, does it flake when you reach for a short scratch on the back of your hand? According to Dr. Dempsey, these are all indicators that you are deficient in omega 3s and omega 6s. She notes that these essential fatty acids are crucial for the health of the follicles and that they help to keep your hair and scalp moisturized and healthy. In order to increase your intake of these nutrients, consume more flaxseeds and sunflower seeds, as well as fish and fish oil supplements.

Your hair is super thin

In the event that your hair is naturally on the thinner side, you may not notice when it becomes even more sparse. However, if your hair gets thin all over, according to McMordie, it might be a sign that you need to supplement with more protein. Because hair cells, like every other cell in the body, are composed of amino acids, which are the broken down form of protein, if you aren’t receiving enough of them, you may notice that you are losing more hair than usual. She suggests eating plenty of protein, which can be found in fish, eggs, chicken, steak, and dairy products, to ensure that your hair is full and abundant.

Furthermore, if you’re a vegetarian or vegan, nuts, beans, and whole grains are excellent sources of protein as well. courtesy of Manuel-F-O/Getty Images

Your hair is graying prematurely

However, even if your parents didn’t see their first gray strand until they were in their 40s, you can begin to age sooner or later depending on your genetics and lifestyle choices Although genetics may play a role in some cases, according to McMordie, the loss of pigment in hair at a young age can indicate a copper deficiency in rare instances. Despite the fact that it is a trace mineral that does not require much consumption, she recommends increasing the intake of mushrooms, sesame seeds, and seaweeds in order to combat the process.

Next, take a look at these hair-care tips for healthy, long hair.

  • Paradi Mirmirani, MD, dermatologist and regional director of hair disorders at Kaiser Permanente in Vallejo, California
  • Megan Faletra, MS, MPH, RDN, a global health consultant and dietitian
  • Kaleigh McMordie, MCN, RDN, LD
  • Tania Dempsey, MD, of Armonk Integrative Medicine
  • Paradi Mirmirani, MD, dermatologist and regional director of hair disorders at Kaiser Permanente in Vallejo, California
  • Pa

Originally published on January 3, 2018 by The New York Times

Vitamin deficiency anemia – Symptoms and causes

Vitamin deficiency anemia is characterized by a shortage of healthy red blood cells as a result of lower than normal levels of vitamin B-12 and folate in the body. A lack of vitamin B-12 and folate in your diet, or a problem with your body’s ability to absorb or digest these vitamins, are all possible causes of anemia. When these nutrients are lacking, the body forms red blood cells that are too big and do not function correctly. This has a negative impact on their capacity to transport oxygen.

Vitamin supplements, whether administered orally or intravenously, can help to address vitamin deficits.

Symptoms

Anemia caused by vitamin deficiency generally develops slowly over a period of months to years. The signs and symptoms of vitamin D insufficiency may be minor at first, but they normally become more noticeable as the condition develops. These may include the following:

  • The following symptoms: fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness, pale or yellowish skin, irregular heartbeats, weight loss, numbness or tingling in the hands and feet. Muscle sluggishness
  • Personality changes
  • Shaky motions
  • Disorientation or amnesia in the mind

Causes

The following symptoms: fatigue, shortness of breath, dizziness, paler or yellowish skin, irregular heartbeats, weight loss, numbness or tingling in the hands and feet. Insufficiency of muscle power Individual differences; erratic motions; confusion or amnesia in the mind

Vitamin B-12 deficiencies

Low levels of vitamin B-12 can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

  • Diet. Because vitamin B-12 is mostly found in animal products such as meat, eggs, and milk, those who do not consume these items may need to supplement their diet with B-12 supplements. Some foods, such as some morning cereals and some nutritional yeast products, have been fortified with B-12 to increase their nutritional value. Pernicious anemia is a kind of anemia that is caused by a virus. This illness happens when the body’s immune system targets cells in the stomach that generate a chemical known as intrinsic factor, causing them to rupture. B-12 cannot be absorbed in the intestines unless this chemical is present. Gastric bypass surgery. There is a possibility that surgery will lower the quantity of intrinsic factor generated and the amount of space available for vitamin B-12 to be absorbed if sections of your stomach or intestines have been surgically removed. Problems with the intestines. It is possible that Crohn’s disease and celiac disease, as well as tapeworms that may be swallowed after consuming infected fish, will interfere with vitamin B-12 absorption

Folate deficiencies

Folate, also known as vitamin B-9, is a nutrient that may be found in abundance in dark green leafy vegetables and liver. It is possible to have a folate shortage if a person does not consume foods that contain folate or if their bodies are unable to absorb folate from meals. Problems with absorption can be caused by the following factors:

  • Indigestion, celiac disease, and other intestinal illnesses
  • Surgical removal or bypass of a major portion of the intestines Excessive use of alcoholic beverages
  • Some anti-seizure medicines, for example, are available only by prescription.

Individuals who are undergoing dialysis for renal illness, as well as pregnant women and nursing mothers, have higher folate requirements than other people. During pregnancy, a deficiency in folate can result in birth abnormalities. However, in nations where folate is frequently added to dietary products such as breads, cereals, and pasta, the prevalence of folate insufficiency has decreased.

Complications

Having a vitamin B-12 or folate deficiency raises your chance of developing a variety of health concerns, including:

  • Complications associated with pregnancy. When a growing fetus does not receive enough folate from its mother, it is more likely to have birth abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord, as well as neurological diseases. If left untreated, vitamin B-12 insufficiency can result in neurological disorders such as tingling in the hands and feet that persists for a long period of time or problems with balance. Because vitamin B-12 is required for normal brain function, it might induce mental disorientation and amnesia
  • Nevertheless, it is rare. Gastric cancer is a cancer of the stomach. Anemia caused by pernicious anemia raises the risk of stomach and intestinal cancer.

Prevention

Some types of vitamin deficiency anemia can be avoided by following a nutritious diet that includes a range of foods. Vitamin B-12-rich foods include the following:

  • Protein-rich meals such as beef liver, poultry, and fish, as well as fortified foods such as morning cereals Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt

A variety of meats and poultry (including liver and chicken); eggs; fortified meals (including breakfast cereals); Ingredients: milk, cheese, and yogurt; Nutritional Information:

  • Broccoli, spinach, asparagus, and lima beans are examples of vegetables. Oranges, lemons, bananas, strawberries, and melons are among the fruits available. Products made with enriched grains, such as bread, cereal, pasta, and rice
  • Liver, kidneys, yeast, mushrooms, and peanuts are all examples of organ meats.

The following vitamins are required in adequate levels by the majority of individuals on a daily basis:

  • 2.4 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin B-12
  • 400 micrograms (mcg) of folate or folic acid

Women who are pregnant or nursing may require higher doses of each vitamin. The majority of people acquire sufficient amounts of vitamins through their diet. However, if you have a restricted diet or have had gastric bypass surgery, you may want to consider taking a multivitamin. The 18th of January in the year 2022

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