A Guide to Minimalism in the Kitchen

A Guide to Minimalism in the Kitchen

Recent years have seen a rise in interest in minimalism, with most of the focus being on de-cluttering your clothes and dumping old books, while the kitchen receives far less attention. However, it should! Especially if you like cooking, it’s easy to amass a large number of items in the kitchen that you don’t actually require. We had a large kitchen as well as a pantry, but it was still not enough space for all of my culinary equipment. In the past year, I’ve embraced minimalism and applied it to all aspects of my life, including my kitchen.

Here’s how I went about it.

Use the Bulk Section

The quantity of space taken up by food in my kitchen was excessive. Bags of foreign flours, nuts, beans, and spices that I purchased for a single dish and never (or only rarely) used again took up several shelves in my pantry, where they remained until they eventually expired and I had to toss them in the garbage. Instead of purchasing a complete box of an item that I know I won’t use again, I now buy only the amount needed for the dish from the bulk aisle rather than purchasing the entire package.

The fact that you’re saving space as well as money is a bonus.'”

But Don’t Buy in Bulk!

Food took up a lot of space in my kitchen because we would buy more than we could ever consume in a reasonable length of time, which was another reason. For example, instead of having 2-3 bags of chips on hand, we’d have 10; instead of having 1-2 boxes of cereal on hand, we’d have 5. Whenever something was on sale, I felt obliged to purchase a large quantity. Because there are only two people and a baby in our household, we don’t have a pressing need to store food in this manner, therefore I stopped.

Eliminate (Most) One-Function Tools

It was also because we would buy more food than we could ever consume in a reasonable length of time that food took up so much space in my kitchen. Instead of keeping 2-3 bags of chips on hand, we’d have 10 on hand; instead of 1-2 boxes of cereal, we’d keep five boxes on hand. In the past, I’d feel pressured to buy anything that was on sale. As a family of two adults and a baby, we don’t have a need to hoard food in such large quantities, thus I stopped doing so completely. It is common for us to purchase a bag or two of chips or a box or two of cereal, and then replenish our supplies.

Get Rid of Multiples

How many saucepans, casserole dishes, and baking sheets of the same size do you actually need in the first place?

Probably not quite as many as you claim to have. I opted to save two of each item in some sizes because I use them frequently, but for the most part, I only kept the finest of the lot and threw away the rest.

Purge Things You Don’t Use

This is somewhat connected to the previous two points, but it merits its own subheading due to the fact that it is a significant topic. I have a ton of items that I kept simply in case something happened. I had several cheeseboards on hand in case I needed them for an entertaining situation. Extra kniveswere kept on hand in case my good knives were soiled. And then there were items that even I knew I wouldn’t use—things that I bought because I thought every cook should have them, but that I either didn’t enjoy using or never used in my cooking because I didn’t like the taste of them.

Clear Off Countertops

You can now store your small appliances in your cabinets, thanks to all of the extra room created by the purging you just completed. The counter space in my previous kitchen was enormous, but it didn’t seem that way because it was completely filled up with little appliances and other kitchen miscellaneous items. All of those stuff made my huge kitchen feel cramped and crowded, despite its size. Now, the only things I keep on the counter are our toaster and coffee machine, as well as a knife block.

Despite the fact that I use my food processor and blender on a daily basis, storing them in a cupboard and pulling them out when I need them is not a major problem.

Pare Down Your Dishes

Have you amassed a collection of haphazard dishes, bowls, and glasses throughout the course of your life? Get rid of them as soon as possible! All that remained was one matching set of white dishware, an extra set of bowls in a smaller size for cereal, one matching set of glasses, and three smaller glasses for our kid. The rest was donated or given to charity. (This is a significant deal for a food blogger since wehoarddishes is a household name.) Dishes and glasses that match stack more easily, which makes it easier to organize your space.

But Don’t Throw It Out!

Throughout the years, have you amassed a collection of odd dishes, bowls, and glasses? They must be removed from the situation! Everything else went into the trash except for one matching set of white dishware, an extra set of cereal bowls in a smaller size for our daughter’s cereal, one matching set of glasses and three smaller glasses for her. (This is a big deal for a food blogger since wehoarddishes is a massive issue.) ( Dishes and glasses that match stack more easily, which makes it easier to manage your storage space.

A Guide to Minimalism in the Kitchen

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In our kitchens, the majority of the items we bring in (storage containers, dry meals such as rice and cereal) are packaged in colorful, noisy packaging with attention-getting labeling.

In the words of minimalist consultant Devin VonderHaar, “It may be extremely overstimulating, whether or not you are conscious of it.” Here are her recommendations for lowering the loudness in order to create a more tranquil cooking and gathering environment.

Organize What You’ve Got

When it comes to organizing your pantry, VonderHaar suggests “decanting” items by removing their packaging to create a more consistent appearance: Using glass containers to store food products, such as recycled sauce and jam jars, can reduce the amount of time spent preparing meals and increase shelf life. It is possible to utilize containers that have long since lost their lids as shelf and refrigerator organizers. Even the plastic container that your takeout arrived in may be used to keep little objects that were previously confined to the junk drawer.

You Only Need One

Specifically, Wong notes that “the kitchen is a hot site for duplication.” Do you really need two cheese graters?” you might wonder. This holds true for pots and pans that perform the same function as one another. Identify your most often used kitchen equipment and consider how they may be improved to perform in even more situations. Is it possible to cook pasta in your beloved wok? Get rid of everything that does the same job again and over.

Keep Counters Clear

Dietrich VonderHaar’s counter is bare save for a coffeemaker and an air fryer in a bright color that she adores. Utensils, appliances, and food items are carefully tucked away in drawers and behind cabinet doors to keep them out of sight. Besides being more convenient to clean, she finds it to be visually soothing.

Make Designated Zones

Everything in your kitchen, from food to equipment, should have its own designated area that makes logical sense depending on how you use it. The oven should be placed near the baking dishes, pots, and pans, which can be piled based on their natural form. Cups, plates, and bowls can coexist in a distinct zone than one another. Even in tiny rooms, having a designated spot for everything may help the space feel more organized.

Upgrade Where It Counts

Hand and dish soap should be stored in glass containers to reduce the use of plastic and to make the sink more aesthetically pleasing (even better if you upcycle or source from thrift stores). Investigate whether there is a soap refill station or store near you, or consider subscribing to a soap subscription service: Cleaning goods by Cleancult are packaged in beautiful, recyclable milk cartons ($9.99 for 32 ounces of hand soap), while Grove Collaborative provides plastic-free, refillable household staples such as soap in aluminum bottles.

Using Intention, Learn How to Declutter Your Life The Benefits of Minimalism on One’s Mental Health Instructions on How to Create a Minimalist Wardrobe Where to Make a Conscientious Donation of Your Once-Loved Items

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How to Create a Minimalist Kitchen (Tips and Essentials)

Most of us spend a significant amount of time in our kitchens, performing a variety of tasks other than simply preparing meals. In fact, the kitchen is frequently referred to as the “heart” of the home. There, we have breakfast, catch up with our partner or children, and indulge in our favorite hobbies, such as baking and cooking, among others. It is possible that you will find yourself working there, especially if you enjoy multi-tasking. However, when we spend a significant amount of time in a single space, it is all too simple to let clutter to accumulate.

Kitchen organization, as well as creating additional space in an area that provides us with value and purpose, may help to elicit happy feelings in our daily lives.

Are you prepared to begin the process of designing your minimalist kitchen? You’ve arrived to the correct location. Continue reading for some suggestions on how to create the minimalist kitchen of your dreams.

What Do You Need for a Minimalist Kitchen?

First and foremost, you’ll need to become extremely organized. In addition, you’ll want a substantial amount of storage space for your belongings. This is especially true if you have a tiny kitchen with limited counter and storage space. We all know that kitchens are full of “stuff,” which is the nemesis of any minimalist who wishes to live a simple lifestyle. To avoid this, seek for clever storage options for kitchen items such as cutlery, utensils, and crockery, which are available online. This kitchen storage solution also happens to be one of my favorites.

  • Additionally, they will be considerably easier to maintain clean as a result of this.
  • You should not leave your toaster out on the counter if you do not use it on a daily basis, as an example.
  • You’ll need to stay on top of things as well, of course.
  • Frequently leave pots and pans in the sink for more than a few hours (or even days!) Do you do this?

Minimalist Kitchen Design

A minimalist kitchen would often have a clean and uncluttered appearance, with no clutter on the countertop or in obvious areas. The design might be straightforward, complicated, or a combination of the two. For an exquisite aesthetic, combine stainless-steel appliances with marble countertops. Alternatively, go for a monochromatic theme, such as all white appliances and cabinetry, for a bright, crisp appearance. It might be contemporary or even have a rustic feel to it. Whichever aesthetic you choose, bear in mind that the final design should be useful and clean in order to be successful.

Because shelves take up less room than cabinets, the open-shelving design may make your kitchen appear larger than it actually is.

Additionally, it may be used as a versatile surface in addition to storing other culinary things in the cabinets and drawers that have been integrated.

A plant or two near a kitchen window, or even a dramatic bouquet of flowers in the middle of your island, can give a splash of color and décor to your space, according to the designer.

Selecting compact appliances with a pleasing appearance is important. Alternatively, seek for handmade cookware that feels elevated, unique, and complements your minimalist style.

What are the Essentials for a Minimalist Kitchen?

Answering this question is a difficult one because it is very dependent on your personal priorities. Do you enjoy preparing meals? Are you a budding baker with big dreams? Alternatively, are you more inclined to order a takeout or rely on prepared foods? Before you begin, take some time to consider the following questions thoroughly. It will be necessary for you to be completely honest with yourself before you begin arranging your minimalist kitchen. If your job or family responsibilities prevent you from cooking from scratch on a regular basis, there is no use in purchasing (or maintaining) utensils and equipment because you simply will not use them on a regular basis.

  • After that, take everything out of all of your kitchen drawers and cupboards and throw it away.
  • What is our recommendation?
  • When was the last time you put it to good use?
  • If you have a coffee machine that has been collecting dust, now is the time to get rid of it!
  • Whatever money you make from your unwanted stuff, you will be able to put it towards some useful kitchen needs or space-saving solutions.

Minimalist Kitchen Essentials List

To assist you with your minimalist kitchen planning, here is a list of the basic goods you’ll need to have on hand: If you’re still not sure which basic products you’ll need to have on hand, here is a list of kitchen basics that will guide you through the process:

  • Knives, forks, and spoons
  • Tumblers or glasses
  • And other tableware There aren’t too many cups and mugs. In this case, 4-6 should be adequate. One pot and one saucepan are all you need. Purchase high-quality, non-stick versions
  • They will be a fantastic investment and will last far longer than some of the less expensive choices. This non-stick set, which you can get here, is one of my favorites. a single high-quality, razor-sharp knife A chopping board, a wooden spoon, oven gloves, a spatula, and a mixing bowl are all recommended. baking dish, baking sheet, sieve or strainer, kitchen scissors, can opener, a pair of food scales or measuring cups, Tupperware or other stackable storage containers for leftovers, and a knife.

You will be able to get by in the kitchen with only these few products on hand. Certainly, if you enjoy baking or are trying to be a Masterchef, you may find yourself acquiring a variety of other items. Nonetheless, if you want to maintain a genuinely minimalist kitchen, these are the items to which you need adhere in order to keep it free of clutter. If you’re thinking of purchasing a new kitchen item or appliance, think about how often you’ll be using it before making your decision. Alternatively, if it’s only once a week, could you maybe lend one to a friend or family member to use as and when you need it?

  • If you enjoy eating warm and crispy bread for breakfast every morning, you’ll need a toaster in order to do it.
  • If you’re a coffee connoisseur, you’ll probably want to invest in a coffee maker rather than depending on instant coffee for your morning cup of Joe.
  • If you enjoy baking, you might want to consider investing in a Kitchen Aid stand mixer for your kitchen.
  • In this section, we’ve discussed the tools and appliances you’ll need.
  • Storage?
  • They offer some fantastic space-saving solutions for compact kitchens that you should check out (and the rest of your house for that matter).

No matter if you’re looking for cabinet dividers, pot and pan hooks, or anything to make the most of a corner cupboard, they’re likely to have something to help you with your minimalist kitchen.

Minimalist Kitchen Tips

What is the one most crucial factor in building a good minimalist kitchen design? Let’s get started.

See also:  Where to Mindfully Donate Your Once-Loved Items

1. Storage

You heard us right, we’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again! Storage. You will always have a neat, tidy, and minimalist kitchen after you’ve cleaned up because you have a place to keep all of the kitchen items you need (note that the emphasis is on the word ” need “!). Make an effort to select goods that will fit together. If you find yourself in need of more than one saucepan, choose ones that are compatible with one another so that they take up less cabinet space. If you are unable to locate nesting goods, keep an eye out for items that fold.

Take a look at some space-saving options.

If you’re looking for ideas, check out your local homeware store or IKEA for some inspiration.

2. Get Organized

Then there’s the matter of organizing. Take a look around your kitchen and see what you have. Sort your belongings into groups based on how often you use them: daily, weekly, monthly, or less frequently. Obviously, the “less” category will need to be examined, since these are the items that you will most likely be able to do away with. However, the items in your daily and weekly categories should be kept in a convenient location that is easy to reach. Making the mistake of putting the saucepan in which you prepare delicious oatmeal every morning in the back of the closet will not be a wise decision in the long run.

A spoon is not something that should be hunted through a drawer full of forks and knives for, especially when you’re in a rush.

And you’ll be able to see right away when you’re running low on supplies – which indicates it’s time to do the dishes or turn on the dishwasher.

3. Keep Track of What You Have

Then there’s the matter of planning. Take a look around your kitchen and see what you can come up with! Sort your belongings into groups based on how often you use them: daily, weekly, monthly, or less frequently (less is more). Unquestionably, the “less” category will need to be examined, since these are the items that you will most likely be able to do away with. It is important, however, to save the items in your daily and weekly categories in a location that is easy to find. Putting the saucepan at the back of the cabinet that you use every morning to cook delicious oatmeal is not a wise decision in the long run.

There’s nothing worse than having to rummage through a drawer full of forks and knives just to find a spoon, especially if you’re in a need.

You could even wind up harming yourself on a knife blade, which is not a pleasant experience. In addition, you’ll be able to see right away when you’re running low on supplies – which indicates it’s time to wash the dishes or put the dishwasher on to do the dishes.

Minimalist Kitchen Guide – 4 Helpful Decluttering Ideas

Kitchens that are minimalist in design may be divided into two categories. They can take on several forms, including kitchens that are artistically constructed in a minimalist manner. That may entail using black and white walls, less bulky furniture, and a minimalistic design scheme in general. Another way that people may conceive of a minimalist kitchen is as a cooking place that just has the bare necessities that provide meaning and value to the cooking experience. It is possible to simplify a kitchen in a way that is pleasing to you, regardless of how you consider a minimalist kitchen in general.

How can I make my kitchen minimalist?

Whether you are aware with the term already or not, minimalism is the practice of paring down your belongings to only the objects that are most important to you. These are goods that you want to use on a regular basis and that you will like using. People frequently have a large number of kitchen supplies on their shelves and in their cabinets that they only use once or twice a year. If that’s the case for you, it could be a good idea to rethink if you should donate or sell those goods in order to make more room.

For the sake of this essay, I’m going to concentrate on the decluttering part of becoming more minimalist in your kitchen design.

Minimalism in the kitchen

Pots and pans are some of the largest culinary equipment we have in our arsenal. They may take up a significant amount of room, regardless of where you put them. First and foremost, examine whether or not you are someone who likes cooking a great deal. If this is the case, owning a variety of pots and pans might be appropriate for you. It’s possible that you just need one pot or pan if you’re the sort of person who only uses their pots and pans once in a while to prepare a dinner. Because everyone’s personal preferences and lifestyles are different, the way we minimize our kitchens will differ as well.

2. Cups, plates, and utensils

The quantity of cups, plates, and utensils you need will be determined by the number of people that will be there. Consider the following scenario: your home consists of four people, with the possibility of having visitors around for supper on occasion. In such situation, keeping a large number of additional cups, plates, and utensils on hand is a wise decision. Another situation where this may be appropriate is if you have a small home of one or two people, but you frequently invite a bunch of friends around.

You might be able to obtain two of each property to have a backup in case something happens to one of them, but that’s pushing it.

3. Appliances

This may be the most common source of clutter in most people’s kitchens, second only to pots and pans. Several kitchen devices, such as blenders and food processors, may have been purchased in a store or online but only used once or a few times. They’re entertaining for the first few times you use them, but after that, they wind up stacked up in your cupboards and drawers. The decision to get rid of these gadgets is mostly based on whether or not you love cooking in the first place. It is designed for these products to be used for mixing and chopping meals together in order to prepare a meal.

It’s possible that you’re the polar opposite and like to just microwave the majority of your meals.

4. Other unique tools

It occurs to a large number of people. They watch someone cooking with a novel product in a commercial and, despite the fact that they do not cook on a daily basis, they purchase the product. In the past, I recall seeing an advertisement for a pan made of titanium, which was touted as being able to prevent food from adhering to the pan. In addition to having a great Australian accent, the spokesperson demonstrated all of the delicious-looking meals that he could prepare in a pan on the spot for the audience.

However, for someone who enjoys cooking on a regular basis, it would be a wonderful and unusual tool to have in the kitchen.

Are you the type of person who will make continuous use of the one-of-a-kind instruments you have at your disposal?

Final thoughts on making your kitchen minimalist

Thousands of individuals have experienced this. A ad shows someone cooking with a unique product, and despite the fact that they do not usually prepare meals, they purchase the product. I recall seeing an advertisement for a pan made of titanium, which claimed to prevent any food from adhering to the pan. I was intrigued by the claim. In addition to having a great Australian accent, the spokesperson demonstrated all of the delicious-looking meals that he could prepare in a pan on stage. The product looks fantastic, but I’m not someone who cooks on a regular basis, so I’m not too concerned about food sticking to the pan.

That is the assessment you must make while using any unusual kitchen gear, such as an eggbeater or a pizza pan.

Are you the type of person who will make constant use of the one-of-a-kind resources you have at your disposal? Then consider giving these things away to someone in your life who does like cooking, if that is the case.

how to setup a minimalist kitchen part 1 – things to avoid

I’ve been meaning to write a piece about how to set up a minimalist kitchen for quite some time now – in fact, ever since I stayed in my beautiful little one-bedroom apartment in Barcelona last December, really. Something, though, has been preventing me from moving on. It wasn’t until recently that I realized what it was. See, I have to be honest with you: while I totally accept the concepts of minimalism and have pushed myself to not buy any new things for the whole year of 2010, I have not been able to completely purge my kitchen of all non-essentials (or my shoe collection for that mattter).

On begin my guide to setting up a minimalist kitchen, I thought I’d share some of the items I have in my kitchen that aren’t minimalist, as well as a list of things to avoid.

Before I go into the list-making phase, please keep in mind that I understand that kitchen equipment is a highly personal choice.

So please use this as a starting point and make any necessary adjustments to fit your own tastes.

things to avoid in a minimalist kitchen

Machine that makes ice cream No one is surprised to learn that I am obsessed with my icecream machine. Due to the fact that it is towards the end of its useful life and since owning one is very un-minimalist, I’ve been on the lookout for nice frozen treats that give the delicious creamy texture of icecream without the need for special equipment. Still not ready to split ways, but my machine-free honey ice cream recipe below will bring us one step closer to that goal. Microwave oven No. 2 The microwave has been in and out of my kitchen over the years, and I’ve concluded that although they are useful for defrosting stuff at the last minute and potentially melting chocolate, they are not worth the extra space they take up.

  • However, if you are utilizing yours on a daily basis, it should be shown prominently.
  • Next came my grandmother’s lovely, classic sunbeam mix master, which only had one speed — full blast.
  • I haven’t been able to part with it because of nostalgic reasons, but I’m finding myself utilizing it less and less as time goes by.
  • In order to cream butter and sugar together, I use a food processor, which appears to work well but may be lacking in aeration.
  • Sets of knives No.
  • Invest your money wisely and get one exceptionally sharp chefs knife for each cook in the home, with the remaining funds going into a decent sharpening device, such as the furi fingers.
  • This is one area in which I’ve always tried to keep things as simple as possible.

With an oven and a set of powerful arms to knead the dough, you have everything you need to bake wonderful bread – and it won’t be in a strange square tall loaf form.

If you make rice once or twice a week or more, you may skip this section.

7.pasta-making machine I admit that I am at fault here.

My beautiful, Italian-designed pasta maker would be a tough sell if I had the chance to do it all over again.

To make ravioli, I could always use chinese wonton wrappers or cut some fresh store bought lasagne sheets to size if I didn’t feel like making them from scratch.

I could always use a rolling pin or prepare anything that needed to be made by hand, like as these adorable orrechette.

toasted sandwich press (sandwich press) When I was in college, I had a small Breville toasted sandwich maker in my room, which I used almost every day of the week.

Vegetables roasted in the oven were a popular choice.

Since then, I haven’t had much need for one.

Although it takes a bit longer, I think that toasted sandwiches are just as wonderful – if not slightly crispier because the steam is leaving as you cook rather than being contained — this way.

Really, there isn’t much else to say.

I like to stir fry in a large frying pan rather than a wok since the heat transmission is better in a large frying pan than in a wok — I don’t have one of those fancy gas wok burner things.

11.griddle pan with a lid A cast iron pan with ridges in the centre was the first thing I bought for my BBQ before I even started cooking!

I’m quite sure I never used the griddle pan again when I discovered the BBQ option was available.

That was a fantastic decision.

Now, I enjoy making stock and frequently prepare for a large number of people, so I can justify the use of a stock pot.

Although I only really need one of the three saucepans – probably the middle kid – it feels strange to be dividing up a family in this way.

Save yourself the embarrassment by purchasing your pots individually.

After I finish thinking about what a minimalist baker might require, I’ll share my views with you next week.

I also have three flat baking trays, two round ‘piza’ trays, and two fourteen.anything that is only intended to be utilized on “exceptional” occasions There were several dining sets and crystal glasses in my home growing up, but they were only utilized on a couple of times.

15.mortarpestle If you want to call me a mad scientist, I’ll tell you that I like possessing a mortarpestle almost as much as I enjoy speaking the words “mortar” and “pestle.” The fact is that it is largely used to store matches and is not used very often – it is probably used once every two months or so on average.

  1. 17).
  2. 16.anything that is just decorative Kitchen equipment may be both functional and aesthetically pleasing in their own right — I particularly like my jar of stainless steel utensils, which sits on my windowsill.
  3. a coffee grinder for the purpose of grinding spices I’m sure I’ve extolled the virtues of freshly roasted and ground spices, and it’s true that they are more aromatic and flavorful when they are freshly ground.
  4. With the exception of hardcore curry heads, I believe it is preferable to purchase high-quality preground spices in limited quantities to ensure that you are always purchasing fresh ingredients.
  5. 18.toaster Even though it is somewhat controversial, I greatly like to toast my bread beneath the grill so that I may toast one side for the warm toasty flavors while leaving the other side nice and soft.
  6. Expensive coffee machines are number 19 on the list.
  7. In fact, if one lived in the country, it would make perfect sense.
  8. He had the real thing machine and grinder, which took up a lot of room, but I became pretty addicted to my morning latte and didn’t mind it taking up a lot of space on my workbench in the process.
  9. Utensils that are only used once Among the items I found were an apple corer, egg fry rings, lemon juicer, nut cracker, and a strawberry dehuller (no, I did not fall for that one).

22.carving knife with an electric motor Although I’ve found that maintaining my chefs knife sharp has proven to be beneficial, I’ve discovered that I don’t have the time to go through my drawers to locate the blades and base, much alone put it all together, and instead prefer to carve with my cooks knife.

  1. Is it, however, absolutely necessary?
  2. 24.a blowtorch for the kitchen To be quite honest, I wish my machine had more power so that I could produce an authentic crème brulee every time I wanted to.
  3. Bamboo steamers are number 25 on the list.
  4. So far, I’ve only used them twice since I purchased them during a frenzied pork bun boiling frenzy in 2003.
  5. 26.various shapes and sizes of wine glasses Sure, it might be more pleasant to drink white wine from a smaller glass, or even to go crazy with different shapes for different grape kinds – this is enjoyable in a restaurant, but not necessary in the home setting.
  6. I still have a few white wine glasses lying around, but they’re on their way out as well.
  7. Paella pans (number 27) They are adorable, but, unless you are Spanish or are urgently attempting to become such, a huge frying pan would enough for most purposes.

I did utilize them up until the cover of the largest one snapped off.

I’ve switched to using my Le Creuset dish for my tajines and am content to display them in the living room as a decorative item.

If you’ve ever been underwhelmed by frosty semifreddo and other frozen desserts made without the use of a machine, I understand your frustration.

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Delicious as a dessert on its own, it would also be fantastic in all the areas where icecream works so well – with hot chocolate pudding, apple crumble, bread and butter pudding, and so many more dessert recipes.

However, it does have a strong honey flavor, which is fantastic in most circumstances but might be a touch overbearing when served as an accompaniment to something like a passionfruit souffle, for example.

Take pleasure in this small treat till then.

Take the pan off the heat.

Whip the cream until it begins to thicken and form soft peaks, about 2 minutes.

Allow for at least 4 hours of freezing time before you intend to consume it.

Freeze for at least 3 hours before using._ My progress toward my reading target for the year is still going nicely.

Having made some adjustments to myNow Readinglist, I’d love to hear any recommendations you have for books on food as well as other subjects. Subscribe to stonesoup by email to receive your free weekly updates, which are published twice a week on Monday and Friday.

Minimalist Kitchen Tour: Keeping it Simple in the Kitchen

Machine for making ice cream No one is surprised to learn how much I enjoy my icecream maker. Due to the fact that it is towards the end of its useful life and since owning one is very un-minimalist, I’ve been on the lookout for nice frozen treats that give the delicious creamy texture of icecream without the need for specialized equipment. However, with my machine-free honey ice cream recipe (see below), we’re one step closer to saying goodbye. oven with a microwave Since I’ve had a microwave for several years, I’ve come to the conclusion that, while it can be useful for defrosting foods at the last minute and potentially melting chocolate, it isn’t worth the space they take up.

  1. As long as it is being used every day, though, it should be shown prominently.
  2. Afterwards, I acquired my grandmother’s beautiful, antique sunbeam mix master, which only has one speed — full blast.
  3. Nowadays, if I want to whisk egg whites or whip some cream, I use a basic old whisk and think of it as an opportunity to give my aging arm muscles a good workout.
  4. When it comes to baking or making pavlovas, having a stand mixer may be worth the money and space investment, but for the rest of us, it is not worth it.
  5. While they might be really fashionable, and it can be useful to have a number of fine knives in the house if there are more than one of you cooking at the same time, there aren’t many people who genuinely want seven knives of various sizes.
  6. When it comes to making rustic sourdough loaves, the only additional tool you’ll need is a bread knife, which I’m sure you already have.
  7. 5th, a bread maker Despite the fact that this craze should be well and thoroughly over, I can’t think that there are many individuals who genuinely use their bread maker on a regular basis.

cooker de riz (rice maker) OK OK.

But, for the rest of us, what’s wrong with a decent saucepan with a tight-fitting cover?

Yes, I’m to blame in this situation!

My beautiful, Italian-designed pasta maker would be a tough sell if I had the opportunity to do it all over.

To make ravioli, I could always use chinese wonton wrappers or cut some fresh store bought lasagne sheets to size if I didn’t have time to make them myself.

I could always use a rolling pin or create anything that needed to be made by hand, such as these adorable orrechettes.

There was always something in the university dining room that could be made half edible by sandwiching it between two slices of bread and cooking it in the ‘jaffel’ machine, which I discovered to be a good thing.

Every now and again, I’d throw an egg into it to “cook.” It has been some years since I last used one.

Sandwiches made this manner are equally as tasty as those made the old-fashioned approach, if not slightly crispier since the steam is leaving rather than being contained while you cook.

Juicers, deep fryers, hot dog heaters, popcorn makers, milkshake machines, and chocolate ‘fountains’ are just a few of the kitchen appliances you may find.

10.wok For nostalgic reasons, I have a magnificent hefty cast iron wok that my mother gave me many years ago and that I barely ever use now.

If you plan on preparing a lot of Asian cuisine, a wok may be a better choice than a regular frying pan, to be certain.

Some people swear by them, and I’m sure they’re effective, but I usually ended up in a smoke-filled kitchen waving a tea towel in front of the fire detector.

Last year, I was able to sell the pathetic creature on eBay.

sauté pans for 12 people Three saucepans in a matching pasta cooker-sized pot, as well as a bigger stockpot, are included in the set.

In fact, it is the most often used saucepan in my kitchen, as evidenced by the fact that I adore it.

If you want to avoid feeling guilty, buy your pots separately.

After I’ve finished thinking about what a minimalist baker might require, I’ll share my thoughts with you next week.

8 individual pie tins, 8 medium individual tart tins with removable bases, 16 small individual tart tins with removable bases, 1 round cake cooler, 1 rectangular cake cooler, 1 large rectangular tart tin with removable base, 1 large rectangular tart tin with removable base, 1 large rectangular tart tin with removable base, 1 cupcake tray (was my Mums), 1 large rectangular tart tin with removable base, 1 large rectangular tart tin (was my Mums), 1 cupcake tray (was I have a variety of baking tins including a 20cm springform cake tin, a 24cm springform cake tin, a pair of sponge tins, a set of square cake tins in small, medium, and large, 1 long skinny loaf tin, and 1 fat (actually it’s more big boned) loaf tin.

  1. I also have three flat baking trays, two round ‘piza’ trays, and two metal a piece of clothing that is only to be worn on “exceptional” circumstances 14.
  2. If it’s good enough for Christmas Day, then it should be good enough for a random wet Tuesday, since life is too short.
  3. After ditching my spice grinder (see No.
  4. There’s nothing quite like a hand smashed curry paste when you’re in the mood.
  5. However, the display is functional.
  6. Freshly roasted and ground spices are more aromatic and flavorful, as I’m sure I’ve mentioned before.
  7. Having said that, I can’t recall the last time I roasted and ground some spices in my kitchen.
  8. Herbies.com.au has a lot of fans.
  9. If you use your toaster on a daily basis, it should unquestionably have a permanent home in your refrigerator.

They always seem like a wonderful idea at the time, but most people I know go through a home barista period before realizing that half of the pleasure of coffee is the ritual of going out and having it prepared by a professional, and their pricey equipment ends up collecting dust in the corner.

  1. As a result, it brings back memories of my time living in the Barossa with an ex-barista.
  2. Oven mitts are number twenty.
  3. Utensils with a single usage This year’s gifts included an apple corer, egg fry rings, lemon juicer, nut cracker, and strawberry dehuller (although I didn’t fall for that one, unfortunately).
  4. Electric cutting knife (number 22).
  5. 23.mandoline Okay, I’m not going to get rid of my v-slicer just yet because I use it on a regular basis, but Is it, however, a requirement?
  6. blowtorch for the kitchen To be quite honest, I wish my oven had more power so that I could cook an authentic crème brulee.
  7. Steamers made of bamboo (no.

We got these for a low price!

I understand that it is past time for them to depart.

A set of champagne flutes (because I’m a big sparkling wine fan and drinking it out of regular wine glasses just doesn’t seem right) and a set of wine glasses that are on the larger side for red wines are on their way into my collection.

Because I occasionally have that many visitors, I’m planning on buying a dozen of each, but you could get away with just enough for each wine-drinking member of the family.

Tajine plates are a type of casserole dish.

I did utilize them up until the lid of the largest one snapped off in my hands.

As a result, I’ve switched to using a Le Creuset dish for my tajines and am content to display them as a decorative item in the living room.

For those of you who have been let down by frosty semifreddo and other frozen desserts made without the use of a machine, I understand your frustration.

Delicious as a dessert on its own, it would also be fantastic in all of the dishes where icecream is often used, such as hot chocolate pudding, apple crumble, and bread and butter pudding.

The main drawback is that it has a strong honey flavor, which is fantastic in most circumstances but may be a little overwhelming as a complement to something like a passionfruit souffle, for example.

Take pleasure in this small gift till that time comes.

cream that has been doubled in weight One and a quarter liters (300mL).

Immediately remove the pan from the stovetop or oven.

Using an electric mixer, whip the cream until it begins to thicken and form soft peaks.

Allow for at least 4 hours of freezing time before you want to consume it!

Allow for at least 3 hours of freezing time.

With my reading goal for the year, I’m still on track. Having made some adjustments to myNow Readinglist, I’d love to hear any recommendations you have for books on food as well as other topics. If you subscribe to stonesoup via email, you will receive free updates twice a week.

Minimalism can look different for all of us

1.an ice cream maker No one is surprised to learn that I am obsessed with my icecream maker. But, because it’s on its last legs and owning one is rather un-minimalist, I’ve been on the lookout for nice frozen treats that have the lovely creamy texture of icecream but don’t necessitate the use of special equipment. Still not ready to say goodbye, but my recipe for machine-free honey ice cream brings us one step closer. 2nd, a microwave oven Since I’ve had a microwave for several years, I’ve come to the conclusion that, while it can be useful for defrosting items at the last minute and potentially melting chocolate, it isn’t worth the space they take up.

  • However, if you use yours on a daily basis, it should be shown prominently.
  • My grandma left me her beautiful, classic sunbeam mix master, which only has one speed – full blast.
  • To whisk egg whites or whip cream these days, I use a plain old whisk and consider it an opportunity to give my aging arm muscles a good workout.
  • Unless you’re a serious baker or pavlova maker, a stand mixer isn’t necessary for the majority of us.
  • However, there aren’t many individuals who truly require seven knives of varied sizes.
  • If you’re a fan of rustic sourdough loaves like I am, the only additional tool you’ll need is a bread knife.
  • 5.

In fact, all you need is an oven and a set of strong arms to knead the dough into great bread — and it won’t be in a bizarre square tall loaf form.

If you make rice once a week or more, you may omit this step.

7th, a pasta-making machine I’ll admit that I’m to blame here.

If I could go back in time, I’d have a hard time justifying my gleaming, Italian-designed pasta machine.

To make ravioli, I could always use Chinese wanton wrappers or cut some fresh store bought lasagne sheets to size if I felt like it.

8.

I discovered that there was always something in the university dining room that could be made half palatable by sandwiching it between two slices of bread and putting it through the ‘jaffel’ maker.

I’d also use it to ‘cook’ an egg every now and again.

If I want to create a toasted sandwich, I use my trusty frying pan and cook one side at a time, squashing it down as I go.

9.any other tiny appliances with a’single purpose’ Juicers, deep fryers, hot dog heaters, popcorn makers, milkshake machines, and chocolate ‘fountains’ are just a few of the items available.

10.wok I have a beautiful hefty cast iron wok that my mother gave me many years ago and that I almost ever use but keep around for nostalgic purposes.

Of However, if you plan on preparing a lot of Asian cuisine, a wok may be a better choice than a frying pan.

I know some people swear by them, but I always found myself in the middle of a smoke-filled kitchen waving a tea towel in front of the fire alarm.

In the previous year, I sold the unfortunate creature on eBay.

12.saucepan and frying pan sets I have a three-pot set that includes a pasta cooker-sized pot and a bigger stockpot.

My pasta pot is one of my favorite culinary tools, and it is certainly the most often used saucepan in the house.

Save yourself the embarrassment by purchasing your pots separately.

a variety of cake pans and tart shells in various shapes and sizes This, along with the ramekin-like pots, white plates, and wine glasses, is arguably the weakest link in my minimalist kitchen.

People, life is too short; if it’s good enough for Christmas day, it should also be good enough for a random wet Tuesday.

But I like having a mortarpestle almost as much as I enjoy speaking the words “mortar” and “pestle.” The fact is that it is usually used to store matches and is only used around once every two months on average.

17).

16.Anything that is just decorative Kitchen tools may be both functional and aesthetically pleasing in their own way — I like my jar of stainless steel cutlery that sits on my windowsill.

17.

However, I can’t recall the last time I roasted and ground my spices in my kitchen.

Herbies.com.au is one of my favorite websites.

If you use your toaster on a daily basis, it should unquestionably have a permanent home in your kitchen.

While living in the country, it might make sense.

While he had a high-end machine and grinder that took up a lot of room, I became fairly reliant on my daily coffee and didn’t mind it taking up a lot of my bench space.

20) Use a tea towel instead of oven mitts if you’re a girly girl.

There are hundreds upon thousands of small kitchen devices that, while they may make life a little simpler every now and again, they are not worth the clutter in the long run.

23.mandoline Okay, I’m not going to throw away my v-slicer because I use it on a regular basis.

Without a doubt, using a sharp knife and a little time will typically yield results that are comparable.

Instead, I’d trade it in for a genuine blokey, full-strength blow torch, which I could then use to brown meat and cook a variety of other foods.

25) They were reasonably priced.

I’m aware that it’s past time for them to leave.

A set of champagne flutes (because I’m a big sparkling wine fan and drinking it out of regular wine glasses just doesn’t seem right) and a set of wine glasses that are on the larger side for red wines are on their way into my collection.

I’m thinking of getting a dozen of each because I occasionally have that many guests, but you could get by with just enough for each wine-drinking member of the family.

28.tajine meals or tajine-style foods I do have a set of three clay tajines from Morocco that I use sometimes.

When I looked closer, I saw that the whole steam spinning in the conical cap and condensing was a subtle change that I wasn’t even aware of.

6 servings of honey icecream made without a machine If you’ve been disappointed by frosty semifreddo and other frozen desserts made without the use of a machine, I understand your frustration.

Delicious as a dessert on its own, it would also be fantastic in all of the dishes where icecream works so well, such as hot chocolate pudding, apple crumble, and bread and butter pudding.

The main drawback is that it has a strong honey flavor, which is fantastic in most circumstances but might be a bit overwhelming as a complement to something like a passionfruit souffle.

Enjoy this small pleasure till then.

Remove the skillet from the heat.

Whisk the cream until it begins to thicken and form soft peaks, about 2 minutes.

Freeze until you’re ready to eat — at least 4 hours is recommended.

Allow for at least 3 hours of freezing time._ My reading goal for the year is still on track.

I’ve updated my Now Readinglist, and I’d love to hear any recommendations you have for food-related and other books you’d recommend. If you subscribe to stonesoup via email, you will receive your free updates, which are published twice each week.

Minimalism is about simplifying to make your life easier

If you want to simplify and declutter your kitchen, this does not always imply getting rid of everything. And it certainly does not imply that you should give up items that make your life more convenient in any way. In its place, conscious evaluation of what you have in your kitchen and determination of whether you require, utilize, or like it is required. After that, you should get rid of whatever you don’t use, need, or love. The objective of giving you a tour of our minimalist kitchen is not to demonstrate what minimalism “should” look like in terms of design.

See also:  Give Me My Props (And Make Them Pretty)

We are a regular family of four who makes and eats the bulk of our meals at home, as is the case for most families.

Simply said, it’s structured, streamlined, and simple to stay that way — simply because we only keep what we use, require, and like.

Anyone who wishes to simplify their lives, declutter their homes, and spend less time managing the “things” in their homes and more time living their lives may benefit from minimalism.

See more of our minimalist home

Remember to look at the other sections of our home that I’ve posted to get a better sense of our minimalist lifestyle: Tour of a Minimalist Playroom: Creating a Simple, Playful Environment Tour of our Simple and Functional Command Center: Simplifying to Make Life Easier Take a tour of our Minimalist Bathroom.

Find more encouragement to simplify your kitchen

And, for even more encouragement, inspiration, and direction on how to simplify your kitchen and create your own version of a minimalist kitchen, check out the other entries in my “simplify your kitchen” blog post series, which include the following: Here are six high-impact ways to begin simplifying your kitchen immediately. Learn how to simplify your kitchen while also discovering 20 items to declutter right now! Keeping your kitchen organized and clutter-free requires 13 habits.

Creating space for connection

The kitchen is often referred to as the “heart of the house” because it is where we cook, dine, socialize, and so on. More room for connection, thoughtful cooking and dining, and enabling our kitchen to truly serve as the hard-working heart of our house are created when there are less distractions and less clutter in the kitchen, according to the research. Our kitchen isn’t without flaws. If we had limitless time and resources, there are a number of things I would modify about the situation. However, our kitchen is one of my favorites.

Why a minimalist kitchen is important for me

Cooking and baking are not activities that I enjoy. However, it is crucial to me that my family eats (mainly) nutritious and well-balanced meals. The work of cooking is made less complex by reducing the amount of time spent in the kitchen. Given that I dislike cooking, I don’t want to make it any more difficult by having overflowing cabinets and a counter that is too messy to work at. As a result of simply maintaining what I use and enjoy, I can readily access what I need while still having enough room to work.

Maintaining an orderly kitchen is much easier when you have a simplified, minimalist kitchen, which is one of my favorite aspects of having a simplified, minimalist kitchen.

When you have fewer things, you don’t have to rely on sophisticated organizing methods to keep everything together. As a result, you have more breathing area in your cabinets and drawers, making it much easier to get and remain organized!

See inside our minimalist kitchen!

Let us take you on a tour of our minimalist kitchen without further ado. As you can see in the photo above, our kitchen is designed in a generic manner. Detailed descriptions of each aspect of our minimalist kitchen will follow below!.

Sink side of our minimalist kitchen

Starting with the sink side of the kitchen, I’ll walk you through the upper cabinets from left to right, starting with the upper cabinets. Then, working from left to right, go on to the bottom cabinets and drawers.

Upper cabinets

On the left are the dishes that we use on a daily basis. For our household of four, we have a set of eight plates. Along with three serving plates that I used often for ordinary meals and six pasta bowls, I also had a few other things. In this cabinet, I also put my liquid measuring cups for cooking. Above the sink, I keep all of my commonly used kitchen cleaning items, as well as the detergent for the dishwasher. Since the birth of our children, we have maintained a high level of cleanliness for safety reasons.

Along with casserole plates and a few tiny glass food storage containers, you’ll need to stock your pantry.

To the right of the sink, there is a cabinet that houses our drinking cups.

Small drawers on the left

After that, we’ll go on to the drawers on the left. Our silverware is organized in a wooden organizer on the top drawer. A vegetable peeler, a vegetable brush, and a bottle opener are all included in the rear. In the front of the cabinet are my serving utensils. The third drawer is dedicated to the plastic utensils that my children like. Additionally, there is a number of reusable plastic and metal straws available. The plastic food storage containers are kept in the bottom drawer of the cabinet.

Under the sink

On the left, you’ll find a drawer that contains our rubbish bags. Our pull-out garbage can is housed in the bigger drawer underneath it. We store a variety of products under the sink for convenience. Cleaning supplies such as dish soap and paper towels, as well as additional sponges, gloves, a drying mat, a fire extinguisher and a bin for recyclable things, are all available in the kitchen. I use an over-the-cabinet rack to keep a tea towel on the front of the cupboard and a dishcloth and a face cloth for the kids on the interior of the cupboard.

Fridge and freezer area

To the left of the sink area, we have a refrigerator as well as a freezer that may be used separately. The kitchen was remodeled and designed by the previous owners, and having a full-size upright freezer right in the kitchen is one of my favorite features of this space. The previous owners also renovated and designed the bathroom. Being able to keep the freezer right in the kitchen is quite convenient. Some of the less often used things are kept in the cupboards above the refrigerator and freezer.

I have a couple extra canisters on the right side of the cabinet that I’m not currently using.

Also in this cabinet are our french press, two salad dressing containers, our blender, and our food processor, among other things. After a frightening event in which the blender blade fell out of the blender and onto my kid, I now store these equipment up high and out of reach of children.

The kitchen island

The kitchen island is equipped with two huge cabinets and two drawers. The left drawer is stocked with tea towels, dishcloths, and cloths for wiping my children’s hands and faces after they have finished eating. I keep them segregated by color: green for dishes, and the rest of the colors for hands and faces, for example. Every day, I use one dishcloth and one face cloth, and then I put them in the washing machine. Everything I use for cooking and baking is kept in the drawer on the right. I have reduced the number of culinary utensils in our collection, keeping just those that we use on a regular basis.

  • I keep big plastic containers for baking in the island cupboards on the left, which I mostly use for freezing baked goods.
  • In addition to a serving tray.
  • The appliances include a stand mixer, a slow cooker, a toaster (which is housed in a lovely crumb tray made by my grandfather), and a handheld mixer.
  • I’m willing to make a concession and maintain an additional little appliance if it means I’ll be able to enjoy the delicious delicacies he bakes!

Stove side of our minimalist kitchen

Two huge cabinets and two drawers are located on the kitchen island. I keep tea towels, dishcloths, and cloths to wipe the hands and cheeks of my children after they have finished eating in the left drawer. I keep them segregated by color: green for dishes, and the rest of the colors for hands and faces, for example! One dishcloth and one face cloth are used daily, and then they are thrown in the wash. Everything I use for cooking and baking is kept in the drawer on the right. I have reduced the number of culinary utensils in our collection, retaining just those that we use on a regular basis.

  • I keep big plastic containers for freezing baking in the island cupboards on the left, which I use largely for this purpose.
  • With a serving dish on the side.
  • The appliances include a stand mixer, a slow cooker, a toaster (which is housed in a lovely crumb tray made by my grandfather), and a hand mixer.
  • Because I get to enjoy the delicious delights that hubby bakes, I’m willing to make an accommodation and maintain an extra little appliance.

Upper cabinets

Our cups are kept in the higher cabinets, starting on the left and working our way down. Pretty mugs make me happy, therefore this is one area in our kitchen where I do not adhere to a strict minimalism philosophy. I enjoy using and gifting guests a beautiful cup, so I retain the ones I particularly like. It’s important to remember to maintain what you use often and/or like, whatever that manifests itself for you. I have four travel cups and four water bottles stacked over the microwave. Our spice cabinet is located right next to the microwave.

  • I have cake decorating items on the right side of the table.
  • The spices and a few culinary tools are kept on the bottom two shelves.
  • This makes it possible for me to simply access the objects without having to do anything to maintain their organization.
  • The cupboards on the far left of this side of the kitchen are at an angle, which makes them difficult to reach.

The vitamins for our family are kept at the top shelf of the cabinet. In addition, we keep our tea collection, kettle, and additional coffee pods in the bottom angled cupboard. Have I mentioned that tea is a favorite beverage in our household?

Lower cabinets and drawers

We store our oven mitts and aprons in a drawer adjacent to the stove, just in case (one for me, and one for each kid). Our three frying pans, as well as a broiler pan, are stored in the drawer under the stove. Our baking pans and chopping boards are housed vertically beside the stove, with dividers connected to the bottom of the cabinet to keep them organized. Placemats are kept in a drawer to the right of the stove, to the left of the sink. Additionally, plastic baggies, tin foil, waxed paper, and plastic wrap are kept in the other compartment.

The top one is where we keep our mixing bowls, which are divided into three sets: one metal set, one glass set, and one plastic set.

It is a huge metal sink with a bowl that fits into the center area of the sink and will remain with the house if we ever decide to relocate.

We’ve discovered that the five pots in this set are the ideal quantity and sizes for our household.

The pantry

A pantry is built into the wall of our kitchen. It is not very huge, but it is equipped with pull-out drawers that make optimal use of the available space.

Top pantry cupboard

Crackers and cereal are kept on the top shelf of the pantry’s uppermost shelf. On the left side of the bottom shelf, you’ll find the kids’ goodie basket. On the right, you’ll find our assortment of oils, vinegar, syrup, and honey.

Pull out pantry drawers

Deep pullout drawers are located at the bottom area of the pantry. Because of the drawers, it is simple to reach anything in the pantry while still keeping it orderly. It is convenient to view what we have in the top pull-out drawer, which contains canned items on a riser. In addition, we carry iced tea mix, lemonade mix, hot chocolate mix, and coffee syrup on hand at this location. The following drawer contains our dry items, such as pasta and rice. I prefer to decant most goods to get rid of the heavy packaging and to help keep the food fresher for longer periods of time.

The third drawer is dedicated to storing all of the snacks for the children.

When it comes to snack time, I keep a range of foods on hand that the kids may choose from at their leisure.

I use jars and baskets to keep everything looking fresh and well-organized once more.

Built in wall unit in the dining area

The previous owners created a built-in wall unit in the dining area of the kitchen, which is still in use today. All of the cabinets and drawers are only 12 inches deep. Even though the cupboards are usable at that level, the drawers are cumbersome and difficult to use because they only pull out around 6 inches.

We’re making do with this wall unit since we don’t want to undertake any major renovations at this time and don’t want to spend a lot of money on new cabinets. Finally, here’s another image of the wall to give you a better idea of how it’s laid out.

Wall unit cupboards

Previous owners erected a built-in wall unit in the dining area of the kitchen, which was later removed. The depth of all of the cabinets and drawers is merely 12”. Despite their usefulness, the cupboards are cumbersome and difficult to use because to their limited pullout depth of around 6 inches. As much as this wall unit isn’t my favorite aspect of the kitchen, we aren’t planning any improvements at the moment, so we are making due with what we have! Finally, here’s another image of the wall to give you a better idea of how it’s configured.

Wall unit drawers

My “office” is comprised of the drawers on the left side of the desk. You may find out more about them by clicking here. The bottom drawer has a tablecloth and a pair of napkin rings that the kids like using when they have “fancy” dinners at home. The drawers on the left are filled with a haphazard collection of items. The top drawer has a collection of tools that we use on a regular basis and want to keep on hand. In addition, glass cleaning cloths and spray are available. The middle drawer has some of the messier crafting products that my children are only permitted to use in the kitchen.

The supplies we use to work on school assignments with my daughter are kept in the bottom drawer.

Coffee and tea nook

We have a coffee and tea nook on the other side of the dining room table from the eating area. The previous owners had utilized this room to house a television, but I didn’t want a television in our kitchen, so I removed it. Our goal is to promote dialogue and connection at family meal times, and a television would be too distracting in this regard. My favorite feature of our minimalist kitchen is this tiny nook, which is one of my favorite aspects as well. I designed, created, and personalized everything, and I’m thrilled with the outcome.

A hardwood countertop and shelf were added to match our table and cabinets, and I hand-painted and constructed the sign.

We use this nook to store our Keurig machine, spare pods in the ceramic canister, sugar and spoons on the top shelf (which are stored in my grandmother’s cream and sugar bowls), and other small items.

Basement pantry

The storage closet in the basement, in addition to the kitchen cabinets and drawers, is used for extra kitchen storage. This is where we store any additional food products that we have purchased in bulk or in bigger numbers, as well as bulkier snack goods such as chips and tortilla chips. In addition, I keep a few larger things that I use less regularly, generally just when we have a large number of guests around for dinner. For example, I have a huge slow cooker, a large stock pot, and a roasting pan in my collection.

Our bottles and cans are collected in a large plastic bucket on the floor for recycling.

This chai tea is one of my favorites, and it’s one of the few things I treat myself to on a daily basis.

This photograph was shot a week after my most recent stocking up session.

That, I believe, is a sufficient conclusion! It was my pleasure to take you on a tour of our minimalist kitchen. If you have any questions regarding our minimalist kitchen, or if you think I’ve forgotten something, please leave a comment below and ask away!

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