Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place by Barbara Gates

Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place: Gates, Barbara: 9781570624902: Amazon.com: Books

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Instead of closing your eyes and counting sheep, you scroll aimlessly around Instagram until you read the words: “You’ve caught up with the rest of your friends.” Alternatively, you can find yourself sitting on the couch, unable to resist the desire to push the button for the next episode on Netflix, despite the fact that your body begs for sleep. Most likely, you procrastinate getting ready for bed at night if you find yourself dozing. Bedtime procrastination is distinct from disrupted sleep or insomnia, which many individuals encounter.

Even when they are exhausted, those who suffer from it will actively deny themselves sleep at night.

The lack of self-discipline, according to the majority of scientists, is to blame.

Suggestions for self-care to help you take care of your physical, emotional, and mental well-being It is not merely about delaying when it comes to “revenge bedtime procrastination,” which is defined as “staying up late in a self-revenge style.” When you have a day filled with chores and responsibilities, it is important to psychologically compensate for that.

  1. Following a post by New York-based writer Daphne K.
  2. Specifically, she describes the phenomena as “those who don’t have much control over their daily lives refusing to sleep early in order to restore some sense of independence during the late-night hours.” Our readers were asked if they had any first-hand knowledge of the phenomenon.
  3. Due to a lack of available time during the day, she chooses to do her tasks at night.
  4. “I spend a lot of time on my phone.” This has been my personality since seventh grade, and there’s just no turning back,” she admits.

“With all of my coursework, university applications, and other duties, I barely ever get a time where I can totally control what I’m doing in life, so most days I spend maybe half an hour at night watching YouTube to relax and unwind.” You may use productivity applications to help you balance learning, having fun, and getting enough sleep.

  1. When she’s very fatigued, she says she’ll watch Netflix, read, or do something else to keep herself up until the very last minute.
  2. Staying active during a time when everything is off limits Nester First-year student Chik Yiu-kai at the University of Science and Technology explains: “I frequently sleep till 2pm, losing the morning.
  3. It’s the same for Samrin Monami, a Year 10 student at Island School, who says she stays up late on occasion because she feels bad about not having accomplished enough during the day.
  4. “I feel like I’m wasting my time if I go to bed early,” she says.

People may believe they are regaining control by procrastinating and doing what they want, but Dr Kimberly Carder, a clinical psychologist at Hong Kong clinic Mindnlife who specializes in working with young people, says that spending more time on their phone can actually lead to digital addiction, which is a situation that is completely out of their hands.

Carder claims that the epidemic has exacerbated students’ procrastination before bedtime, since they are forced to stay at home and complete their coursework online.

After all, prior to the epidemic, there was a clear divide between home time and working time, but this boundary is no longer present any longer.

Makeover your bedroom on a budget with these 5 simple and effective ideas.

This might have a negative influence on both their mental and physical well-being, she claims. “Make going to bed a pleasant experience rather than something you dread doing,” she advises.

Review

Is this something you’re acquainted with? Instead of closing your eyes and counting sheep, you scroll aimlessly around Instagram until you read the words “You’re all caught up.” Alternatively, you could find yourself sitting on the couch, unable to resist the desire to push the button for the next show on Netflix, despite the fact that your body begs for sleep. Nodding your head indicates that you are suffering from bedtime procrastination. While many individuals suffer from disrupted sleep or sleeplessness, procrastinating before night is a rare occurrence.

  1. People who suffer from it will actively deny themselves sleep at night, no matter how exhausted they are.
  2. The majority of scientists believe this is due to a lack of self-discipline on their part.
  3. Self-care suggestions to assist you in looking after your physical, emotional, and mental well-being.
  4. The only time you can get some much-needed “me-time” and “regain control” is at night.
  5. Lee, the term went widespread in English on Twitter.
  6. Emma Willard School in the United States is home to Zhiyi Rong, a Grade 11 girl who claims she can connect.
  7. “After I get to bed, I get the feeling that I can finally do whatever I want,” she explains.

“I spend hours on my phone.” The girl explains, “I’ve been like this since seventh grade, and there’s no turning back.” Daniel Chung Ho-Man, a 17-year-old student at Victoria Shanghai Academy, is in agreement.

For the past few years, Allyson Ye, a Year 11 student at Chinese International School in Hong Kong, has also been suffering bedtime procrastination, but she was unaware that it had a name.

Others admitted to engaging in revenge nighttime procrastination, but claimed they did so more out of guilt than out of a desire to enjoy some peaceful time.

Nester First-year student Chik Yiu-kai at the University of Science and Technology explains: “I frequently sleep till 2pm, losing the morning.

For example, if she goes to bed early one night, she feels guilty because she knows she has a lot of schoolwork and other things to accomplish the next day, and she is wasting her time by sleeping.

People may believe they are regaining control by procrastinating and doing what they want, but Dr Kimberly Carder, a clinical psychologist at Hong Kong clinic Mindnlife who specializes in working with young people, says that spending more time on their phone can actually lead to digital addiction, which is a situation beyond their control.

The pursuit of perfection might result in depression, but it is possible to overcome it.

It’s all too easy to lose sight of what constitutes “essential screen time” and to get obsessed with being online at all times.

“Home used to be a place where we could rest; now it’s a place where we can do everything,” she adds, adding that working from home has changed the way we act.

This might have a negative influence on both their mental and physical well-being, she adds. “Make going to bed a joyful activity,” she advises, rather than something that you dread doing.

Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place: Gates, Barbara: 9781590301654: Amazon.com: Books

“A contemplative inquiry that encourages readers to ponder the nature of home and family,” says the publisher. The San Francisco Chronicle published this article. “Already Homeis a collection of lovely, insightful, and frequently poetic work that is well worth reading. Gates re-establishes herself and her readers’ connection to the country, and to the land itself.” —Shambhala Sun et al. “He is a contemporary American transcontinental pioneer with a story that is at once wonderfully comforting and horrifyingly uncomfortable to convey.

Her generosity of spirit is evident on every page of her book.” J.

A testimonial to the healing potential of connecting with ourselves and with the world around us, this book is a must-read for anybody who believes in the power of connection.” —Sharon Salzberg, author of the book Faith and Loving Kindness ‘This exquisitely written memoir succeeds in demonstrating to every one of us that all of our lives are shared limitlessly with our neighbors, with the garden plants, with the toxic waste dumps in our immediate vicinity, that we are linked to all of those beings who have lived and died before us—if only we can summon the love and courage to see it.’ Kate Wheeler’s novel When Mountains Walked describes how she approaches the “daily particularities of living in Berkeley, the exploration of its history and geology, and the venturing forth into the great mysteries and uncertainties of life, love, and time” with the same level of honesty, ease, and wisdom as she does her writing.

As if Thoreau had brought his hut to your neighborhood street corner, Already Homeis a beautiful and poignant reminder to cherish the life that surrounds you.” —Malcolm Margolin, author of The Ohlone Way”Already Homeis a lovely and tender reminder to honor the life that surrounds you.” —Jack Kornfield, author of A Path with Heart and After the Ecstasy, the Laundry (A Path with Heart and After the Ecstasy, the Laundry) “This book may serve as a strong reminder to all readers, regardless of their background, to take a closer look around at the globe we call home,” says the author.

  • Contra Costa Times (Contra Costa, CA) “Gates is a poetic and ambitious writer,” says the critic.
  • “After completing this novel, one is left with a strong desire to return home.
  • It’s a beautiful meditation on how our fear of change and morality has driven us to damage in the name of conserving the environment.” “Do You Believe in Magic?” asks Annie Gottlieb, author of Do You Believe in Magic?
  • Yoga Journal is a publication dedicated to the study of yoga.

It encourages us to take a moment to pause, to gaze, to recognize our unique position in a continuously changing world, and to understand the actual meaning of home.” In collaboration with the Dalai Lama, Howard Cutler, M.D., wrote The Art of Happiness.

From the Inside Flap

The links between local history, the environment, the body, and the soul are explored in this deeply poignant memoir by Lly. Barbara Gates takes the reader on a journey of personal discovery that artfully bridges the gap between the inner and outer worlds of experience by interweaving themes of love and family, home and homelessness, neighborhood and lost wilderness throughout her novel. Following a breast cancer diagnosis and the subsequent realization of her own death, Gates pursues an intuition that her own existence is only a reflection of the shifting terrain.

See also:  Yogakids: Educating the Whole Child Through Yoga by Marsha Wenig

She is a member of the Berkeley Historical Society.

Gates is on the lookout for original shorelines that have been altered by landfill and other factors.

9781570624902: Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place – AbeBooks

This profoundly moving memoir delves into the relationships that exist between local history, the environment, the body, and the spirit of the author. Barbara Gates takes the reader on a voyage of personal discovery that masterfully bridges the gap between the inner and outward realms of experience by interweaving themes of love and family, home and homelessness, neighborhood and remote wilderness throughout her novel. Following a breast cancer diagnosis and the subsequent realization of her own death, Gates pursues an intuition that her own existence is only a reflection of the shifting terrain.

  • She is a member of the Berkeley Historical Society.
  • Gates looks for remnants of natural shorelines that have been altered by landfill, remnant waterways that have been diverted into sewers, and unique local species that is now threatened by pollution from industry and automobile traffic.
  • She assists us in appreciating the sadness and elegance of everyday life, as well as discovering for ourselves that we may realize at any time that we have arrived at our destination.
  • a little about the author: Barbara Gates is a writer and editor who works as a freelancer.
  • She resides in the California city of Berkeley.
  • —Publishers Weekly, et al.
  • Yoga Journal is a publication dedicated to the study of yoga.

As a mapper of the soul, Barbara Gates set out to create a multidimensional map of ‘home.’ Gracefully written, accurately observed, and profoundly felt, Already Home may prompt you to tune in to your own body, heart, and mind to find out where you belong.” —Wheel of Fortune “This is an honest look at how we could more completely embrace our lives, spanning geological time and the enormous ranges of the human heart.” The following is an excerpt from Sharon Salzberg’s Faith and Lovingkindness.

  • “He is a contemporary American transcontinental pioneer with a story that is at once wonderfully comforting and horrifyingly uncomfortable to convey.
  • Her generosity of spirit is evident on every page of her book.” —Jon Kabat-Zinn, author of Wherever You Go, There You Are and The Happiness Hypothesis “This book demonstrates how we might develop a more intimate relationship with our families, our communities, and eventually, all that exists.
  • Howard Cutler, co-author of The Art of Happiness, with the Dalai Lama “Gates is a woman who walks her talk—literally.
  • She motivates me to grasp the day and live more completely in the present.” —Joanna Macy, author of the novel World As Lover, World As Self.

“With the same honesty, ease, and wisdom, the everyday particularities of living in Berkeley, the research of its history and geology, and the going forth into the immense mysteries and uncertainties of life, love, and time are all accomplished.” —Malcolm Margolin, author of The Ohlone Way, in his introduction In a time when so many of us have been uprooted and dispersed across continents, estranged from our physical, cultural, and familial roots, Barbara Gates’ book is a profound and poetic study of our shared homelessness.” Essential Crazy Wisdom and Buddha’s Nature, by Wes Nisker, are two of his books.

“With each change of focus, self and house, garden and neighborhood, are perpetually reborn into the vivid particular-ness that is never separated from the holy ground of all place and all time.” —Sylvia Boorstein, author of the book Pay Attention for the Sake of Goodness “After completing this novel, one is left with a strong desire to return home.

It’s a beautiful meditation on how our fear of change and mortality has driven us to destroy in the name of maintaining culture and civilization.” —Annie Gottlieb, author of Do You Believe in Magic?

“I was struck by the enormity of the task Gates had undertaken.

When it comes to her search for meaning, she is a detective who is honest and devoted to unraveling the various layers of her past.” Author Sue Bender (Plain and Simple) says it best: The section titled “About this title” may refer to a different edition of this title.

Already Home

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We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. If you find any errors in this preview of Already Homeby Barbara Gates, please let us know. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. Begin your review of Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place by clicking on the link below. 14th of September, 2010 Kasey Jueds is a model. It was given a high rating since it was very loved. This is a difficult book to categorize. Part biography, part history of the author’s home neighborhood in Berkeley, part geography, and part spirituality, this book is a mix of all of these things.

  1. Lyrical and beautiful.
  2. This is a difficult book to categorize.
  3. I ended up really enjoying it, despite my initial skepticism; the beginning looked a little disjointed, but the way Barbara Gates transitions between subjects-in a nonlinear, almost dreamlike fashion-began to grow on me as the story progressed.
  4. I’ve never read anything quite like it before.more I believe that reading a book like this at this time was just not the best choice for me.
  5. I have far too many fantastic books to read to force myself to read something I’m not interested in.
  6. Thank you for returning.

Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place by Barbara Gates

This very emotional book delves into the relationship between local history, the environment, the body, and the soul of the author’s family. Barbara Gates embarks on a journey to find purpose in her urban Berkeley, California, house after receiving a cancer diagnosis. She investigates issues such as love and family, home and homelessness, neighborhood, and the changing geology of the earth. As viewed through the lens of Buddhist mindfulness practice, Gates encourages readers to embrace the expansive view of where they are, including both the past and future, to recognize and appreciate the heartache and grace of everyday life, and ultimately to discover, for themselves, how at any moment, the realization that we are already at home can dawn on them.

  1. Grandma Darlene’s taxi driver has knocked on our house twice in the last several weeks, since she began to recuperate from her stroke and began participating in this program.
  2. Jackson staying with you until her granddaughter, Donna, returns from work?
  3. I offer Grandma Darlene to join me upstairs or to sit in my back yard among the ladders and old shingles, like she has done on the previous two occasions.
  4. With the best intentions, I bring one of our garden chairs up onto the porch for Grandma Darlene to sit on.
  5. I should have seen that wasn’t her style.
  6. As a result, I collapse into one of the stairs below.
  7. A train whistle may be heard in the distance.

An attractive young woman dressed in halter top, hot trousers and heeled shoes is smoking outside while I stand there watching her.

While this is going on, I observe Grandma Darlene becoming more relaxed.

Her memories of that time are crystal clear.

“I understand,” I respond.

I take a cautious glance around.

Maybe she’s been in the hospital, or maybe she’s been staying in another part of town, or maybe she’s been in jail again.

Honey has also vanished.

“You are aware that Dee is Donna’s daughter,” Grandma Darlene says.

Grandma Darlene chuckles, a generous flood of laughter enveloping the room.

That’s all there is to it.

I’m having trouble remembering who is who.” She involves me in her laughter and allows me to take comfort in the fact that she is confused.

We sit in quiet for a few minutes.

A balding pasty-faced man in a business suit parks his Buick across the street and sits there looking at the woman in the halter top.

“No,” she responds. Setting herself more comfortably against the ragged shingles of her house, which she’s considered her true home for the past many years. “No, I’m not going anywhere,” Grandma Darlene reiterates. “There’s no else on the planet I’d rather be right now than right here.”

Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place By Barbara Gates 9781590301654

It is the subject of this deeply affecting memoir that the author investigates the relationship between local history, nature, the body, and the spirit. Barbara Gates embarks on a quest to find purpose in her urban Berkeley, California, house after receiving a cancer diagnoses. She delves into issues such as love and family, home and homelessness, neighborhood, and the changing geology of the earth, among others. As viewed through the lens of Buddhist mindfulness practice, Gates encourages readers to embrace the expansive view of where they are, including both the past and future, to recognize and appreciate the heartache and grace of everyday life, and ultimately to discover, for themselves, how at any moment, the realization that we are already at home can dawn on us.

  • 19: “With the Grandmothers,” a story about being homeless and finding a home.
  • Grandma Darlene’s taxi driver has came to our house twice in the last several weeks, since she began to recuperate from her stroke and enrolled in this program.
  • Jackson remain with you until her granddaughter, Donna, arrives home from work?
  • This is the third time I’ve invited Grandma Darlene to join me upstairs or to sit in my back yard among the ladders and old shingles, as she has done on the previous two instances.
  • With the best intentions, I move one of our garden chairs up onto the porch for Grandma Darlene to sit on.
  • Her way wasn’t my way, and I should have realized that beforehand.
  • As a result, I collapse upon one of the stairwell stairs.
See also:  Aligned, Relaxed, Resilient: The Physical Foundations of Mindfulness by Will Johnson

Across the street, a train rumbles.

An attractive young woman dressed in halter top, hot trousers and heeled shoes is smoking outside while I stand by and observe her.

Meanwhile, I observe Grandma Darlene becoming more relaxed.

Her recollections of that time are vivid.

It occurs to me, “I understand.” Only all-too-well, in this case.

Recent events have revealed that Dee has been completely absent.

Her whereabouts had come to my attention.

This time around, Dee was able to place Honey with some “white individuals” she’d met “up at the barbeque on San Pablo Avenue” just before she disappeared.

“Don’t you mean to say Donna is Dee’s daughter?” I interject.

“Yeah.

These days, I’m a whole jumble of thoughts.

She appears to forgive me, herself, and her unstable abilities as they begin to disintegrate in a single long peal of the phone handset.

There is an up-and-down rumbling of automobiles.

If you haven’t been back to South Carolina in a long time, do you ever feel a hankering to see your family and friends from back home?

Her response is, “No, not at all.” She leans against the tattered shingles of her house, which has been her home for many years and is genuinely her sanctuary.

The elderly woman says, “No, I am not leaving here.” Nowhere else in the world would I rather be than right here.” “There isn’t a place I’d rather be than here.”

Already Home

This very emotional book delves into the relationships that exist between local history, the environment, the body, and the soul of the author. Barbara Gates takes the reader on a voyage of personal discovery that masterfully bridges the gap between the inner and outward realms of experience by interweaving themes of love and family, home and homelessness, neighborhood and remote wilderness throughout her novel. Following a breast cancer diagnosis and the subsequent realization of her own death, Gates pursues an intuition that her own existence is only a reflection of the shifting terrain.

She is a member of the Berkeley Historical Society.

Gates looks for remnants of natural shorelines that have been altered by landfill, remnant waterways that have been diverted into sewers, and unique local species that is now threatened by pollution from industry and automobile traffic.

She assists us in appreciating the sadness and elegance of everyday life, as well as discovering for ourselves that we may realize at any time that we have arrived at our destination.

Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place by Barbara Gates 1570624909 9781570624902

This powerfully moving memoir explores the connections between local history, the environment, the body, and the spirit. Intertwining themes of love and family, home and homelessness, neighborhood and lost wilderness, Barbara Gates takes the reader on a journey of personal discovery that artfully bridges the inner and outer worlds of experience. Prompted by a diagnosis of breast cancer and the accompanying recognition of mortality, Gates follows an intuition that her own life is simply an expression of the changing terrain. She researches far-ranging elements of her Berkeley, California, surroundings: the geological history of the Bay and hills, the history of her house and neighborhood, and the shellmound home of Native Americans who inhabited her area five thousand years ago. Encounters with a homeless woman who sleeps in her car, a rat in her refrigerator, and other adventures alternate with explorations of the area and its history. Gates seeks out original shorelines long since changed by landfill, original creeks that have been run into sewers, and diverse local wildlife now at risk from the pollution of industry and traffic. Looking through the lens of Buddhist mindfulness practice, Gates inspires readers to take a big view of where we live-one that includes the past and future. She helps us to appreciate the heartache and grace of daily life and to find for ourselves that at any moment we might realize that we are already home.Author:Barbara GatesLanguage:EnglishEdition:1stBinding:HardcoverPages:208Publisher:ShambhalaPublication Date:2003-06-01Quantity:(Out of Stock)ISBN:1570624909

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Already Home: A topography of spirit and place, Barbara Gates

This powerfully moving memoir explores the connections between local history, the environment, the body, and the spirit. Intertwining themes of love and family, home and homelessness, neighborhood and lost wilderness, Barbara Gates takes the reader on a journey of personal discovery that artfully bridges the inner and outer worlds of experience. Prompted by a diagnosis of breast cancer and the accompanying recognition of mortality, Gates follows an intuition that her own life is simply an expression of the changing terrain. She researches far-ranging elements of her Berkeley, California, surroundings: the geological history of the Bay and hills, the history of her house and neighborhood, and the shellmound home of Native Americans who inhabited her area five thousand years ago. Encounters with a homeless woman who sleeps in her car, a rat in her refrigerator, and other adventures alternate with explorations of the area and its history. Gates seeks out original shorelines long since changed by landfill, original creeks that have been run into sewers, and diverse local wildlife now at risk from the pollution of industry and traffic. Looking through the lens of Buddhist mindfulness practice, Gates inspires readers to take a big view of where we live�one that includes the past and future. She helps us to appreciate the heartache and grace of daily life and to find for ourselves that at any moment we might realize that we are already home.Already Home:A topography of spirit and place, Barbara Gates, Shambhala Publications, paperback, 2003, 247 pages, $14.95.

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Nonfiction Book Review: ALREADY HOME: A Topography of Spirit and Place by Barbara Gates, Author . Shambhala $21.95 (208p) ISBN 978-1-57062-490-2

The Greater San Francisco Bay Area In a memoir-meditation on the meaning of home, Buddhist writer Gates weaves together geology, ecology, and musings on life as a mother, neighbor, and cancer survivor to form a cohesive whole. Gates takes readers on excursions around her gentrifying Berkeley neighborhood as she explores the questions of who she is and where she belongs. Gates is a writer who lives in Berkeley, California. She has moved away from the East Coast and is slowly establishing a foothold in the neighborhood where she landed up for no apparent reason in her early twenties.

As a result of her relocation, her life and consciousness gradually develop via marriage, parenthood, and the surrounding community.

However, illness also helps to alert her to the fragility and precariousness of ordinary life.

Despite the fact that the sequence of events she describes is often a bit perplexing, her work is well-structured and builds quietly toward a satisfying conclusion.

On the whole, though, this beautifully written book depicts the universe via the grains of sand and ancient shells that have washed up on Berkeley’s beach. (June)

Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place by Barbara Gates – Hardcover – 2003 – from Infospec (SKU: K2518)

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Shambhala Publications, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, 2003. 147 pages/Hardcover in good condition/147 pages – A topography of the spirit and the landscape (HI6B). Hardcover with a dust jacket. Good.

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BooksellerInfospec(US)Bookseller’s InventoryK2518TitleAlready Home: A Topography of Spirit and PlaceBooksellerInfospec(US)Bookseller’s InventoryK2518TitleAlready Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place Barbara Gates is the author of this work. Format/binding Hardcover Condition of the book GoodBinding is in good condition. Hardcover PublisherShambhala PubnsISBN 101570624909ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 139781570624902ISBN 13978157062 Boston, Massachusetts, United States of AmericaDate of Publication2003 History, the environment, the spirit, pollution, memoir, life, journal, profile, and bookseller catalogs are some of the keywords to look for.

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Five years ago, while battling a life-threatening illness, Barbara Gates made the decision to pay greater attention to her surroundings and what was going on in her neighborhood. She has never looked back. The author is a cofounder and coeditor of the Buddhist magazine Inquiring Mind, which she founded with her husband. Using the headings “Running,” “Stopping,” “Looking,” “Seeing,” and “Settling,” Gates takes us on a journey through Berkeley, California, beginning with the shellmound of Native Americans more than 5,000 years ago and continuing through the geological history of the Bay and the hills.

When she goes on an exploratory tour of her neighborhood she includes her encounters with various characters such as an elderly woman who is homeless, a rat who lives in her house, a raccoon who lives in her yard, a skunk, and other wildlife in the area who are all trying to survive in the face of modern life.

Already Home by Barbara Gates

“I can feel the soil beneath my feet when squatting here. I recollect the archaeologists’ ground-sensing techniques and train my senses to detect moisture, heat, and sound in the ground. The soil soothes the soles of my feet, which are still moist from the winter rains. Several layers of sediments from the Berkeley Hills have been transported down by creeks, followed by San Francisco Bay mud transported from the Sacramento and San Joaquin River drainage, then layer after layer of sediments from the hills, followed by more bay muds dating back thousands of years, and so on.

The larger picture shows that there is no way to exist in opposition to other things; instead, there is only the difficulty of resting in what is already present — a continual coming and going, emerging and dissolving.” When I take a deep breath, I am surrounded by scents: mint, excrement, factory fumes, and even my own sweat.

  1. What we’re standing on feels like fundamental ground — it’s expansive and peaceful.
  2. It immediately reminds me of home.
  3. Due to the fact that, of course, I’ve been seething and sniffling, battling with discomforts, and all the time I’ve been right here in this spot with the calm and concealed possibilities that has been here all along.
  4. It comes and goes in an invisible flash, softening as it goes until it dissolves into the background hum of the room.

Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place, by Barbara Gates

Soon after finishing Already Home, I began reading Alexander McCall Smith’s The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, which was published the same year. Precious Ramotswe, the protagonist of the novel, and Barbara Gates have a lot in common. Both ladies discovered that they enjoyed solving mysteries—noticing clues, taking chances, courting danger, and relying on their intuition—and that they were good at it. In the course of their labor, they grew more deeply entrenched in their communities and at ease with themselves.

  • As soon as her inquisitiveness was aroused, she devoted endless hours to investigating deeds, death records, and historical papers in order to discover who had constructed her Victorian home, who had lived there first, and who their neighbors were.
  • The young woman strolled around the streets and lanes of her neighborhood in search of ancient barns and industries, remnants of the area’s early settlements.
  • Researching the history of our houses can have the same effect as looking for knowledge about our biological relatives in terms of strengthening our feeling of roots.
  • It wasn’t easy for her to settle in one place or to acquire the meticulous attention to detail and willingness to take risks that were required of her in order to completely inhabit her home and surrounding community.
  • “I extended my thoughts to create a more encompassing identity than my narrow mortal self.
  • Her study into the geology of the San Francisco Bay Area went back into “deep time,” well before the arrival of human beings on the face of the planet.
  • During her cancer treatment, Gates sought advice from a healer who encouraged her to take more chances in both her acts and her ideas.

It wasn’t a simple task.

She brought the same guts and honesty to her interactions with her neighbors as she did with her friends.

A homeless lady and her family, in particular, were vocal in their opposition to Gates’s inclination to be self-absorbed.

This was, in a way, a form of violence, the violence of not paying attention to what was happening.

Such insights are intertwined within Gates’s recollections of her interactions with family members, neighbors, and local animals—including a skunk, four different kinds of raccoons, a roof rat, and her dog, Cleo.

She become more accepting of herself and others as a result of this experience.

It is possible to gain insight by acknowledging the immense impermanence of time and space.

Thank you, Barbara Gates, for taking on the role of a tenacious investigator of what is concealed.

From the Fall 2003 issue ofInquiring Mind(Vol. 20, No. 1)

Barbara Gates is a writer and developmental editor who lives in Berkeley, California with her husband and daughter. As well as being the author of Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place (Shambhala, 2003), she was the founding and editor in chief of the journal Inquiring Mind. She is now writing on a memoir titled On the Trail of Birth and Death, which will be published in 2018.

Trike DailySocietyEnvironment

The wisdom included in an interview with the Vietnamese Zen master conducted in 1985 is as relevant today as it was then. Thich Nhat Hanh and Barbara Gates talk about their work in this interview.

Trike DailyPersonal Reflections

While researching the Day of the Dead, a writer discovers how to reinterpret traumatic past experiences and let go of their grip on her. Written by Barbara Gates

MagazinePersonal Reflections

Following a visit to the emergency room, a practitioner muses on the characteristics that make her mother so difficult to deal with. Written by Barbara Gates Get the Daily Dharma sent to your inbox. Begin your day with a new outlook on the situation. Investigate time-tested concepts using cutting-edge techniques. The film features Stephen Batchelor, Sharon Salzberg, Andrew Olendzki, and other notables. Take a look at our courses.

BIO

Caitlin, the daughter, at the anniversary/birthday party in 2016. Caitlin, Patrick, and Barbara celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary as well as their 70th birthdays in 2016, according to their Facebook page. Barbara Gates is a writer, developmental editor, and writing coach who specializes in fiction and nonfiction. She enjoys performing her own original creative work, as well as conducting and editing in-depth interviews and providing support for others’ efforts. Inquiring Mind, a Buddhist publication she co-founded with Wes Nisker, was her home for 31 years, during which time Gates served as Co-Editor in Chief.

A topography of spirit and place, Already Home: A Topography of Spirit and Place (Wisdom, 2008), and the co-editor of The Best of Inquiring Mind (Wisdom, 2008).

While working as a literature and writing instructor and co-founder of a community school in the 1970s, Gates co-authored Changing Learning, Changing Lives: A High School Women’s Curriculum from the Group School, which was published in 1978.

In 2015, a meeting of some of the Group School’s founding members was held.

Through the preparation of presentations and interviews for publication, Gates has established relationships with many of the significant figures who have helped to bring Buddhism to the West.

In addition to Ram Dass and Robert Thurman, she has edited presentations by Susan Griffin and Allen Ginsberg, among other luminaries.

Gates has collaborated with many Buddhist teachers through her freelance business as an editor, including the Dalai Lama with Dr.

Gates was born in Manhattan in 1946, and she split her childhood between New York City with her mother and Williamstown, Massachusetts, with her father, who was a professor at Williams College.

She graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Bennington College in 1967 and a master’s degree in education from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1969.

Teaching high school for twenty years, she began her career at the Shady Hill School in Cambridge, then co-founded The Group School, a community high school for low-income pupils in Cambridge, before moving on to the Urban School of San Francisco.

Every day she looks forward to going for walks in the Berkeley hills with her border collie Roxie, as well as writing and editing, socializing and phone talks with her daughter, Caitlin O’Donnell.

Caitlin is pursuing a degree in clinical psychology at Rutgers University. Rajgir is a city in India. Barbara with her mother in her New York City residence, 2015Barbara on a pilgrimage in 2013,

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