Healing Racial Trauma Through the Koshas

Healing Racial Trauma Through the Koshas

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. My client, a 40-year-old community organizer who had come to my yoga studio as a shelter from the outside world, approached me one day while I was supervising a private yoga therapy session. She sat on her mat, dropped her gaze, and slowly shook her head as tears streamed down her face. “I’m simply exhausted.” I’m fed up with having to hold my tongue and modify my speech when I’m among them.

“I’m having trouble sleeping.

“I’m just about finished.” My clients, mostly Black women who are experiencing the daily pangs of racist interactions with white coworkers, acquaintances, law enforcement officers, and strangers, often express these sentiments to me as a yoga therapist in Baltimore City.

Many of my clients are experiencing physical discomfort, mental health pressures, and spiritual crises as a result of the detrimental impacts of racial intolerance.

  1. It is difficult to be a Black woman in the area of yoga therapy and teaching yoga when the majority of the profession is dominated by slender, white women.
  2. During my early years of teaching, I witnessed it firsthand as pupils were taken aback as I brought my dark body to the front of the classroom to educate the class.
  3. “Wow, you’re really eloquent,” one arrogant kid exclaimed after hearing my speech.
  4. Comments like this, while apparently minor, have an impact on your mind, body, and soul, and might trigger memories of painful events in your past.

The recent insurrection at the Capitol, as well as a pandemic that disproportionately affects Black communities, last summer’s uprisings in response to the murders of Breonna Taylor(sign the petition to apprehend her killers), George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless others, and the recent insurrection at the Capitol—are the first signs that many white people are confronting white supremacy and systemic inequalities that plague this country.

  1. COVID-19, on the other hand, is not the most severe pandemic in our societies; rather, it has only discovered an epidemic that has been there for ages.
  2. Today, the effects of this ancestral trauma are exacerbated by institutional injustices that are faced by members of the Black community.
  3. In a city where African-Americans constitute more than 65 percent of the population, we remain in the minority when it comes to obtaining adequate quality of life.
  4. Furthermore, the nationwide protests in June 2020 re-ignited the traumas of the 2015 uprisings, which erupted when police officers shot and murdered Freddie Gray.
  5. According to Dr.
  6. While we have evolved to survive, and even thrive, ancestral trauma has a significant impact on our overall well-being, according to her research and writing.
  7. Racially motivated traumatic stress (RBTS), also known as orracial trauma, is characterized by hypervigilance, a dysregulated nervous system, and an increase in worries and anxiety.

When you put it all together, you have a population that suffers from mental and physical stress and suffering on a level that is unparalleled.

The practice of yoga can aid in the recognition, processing, and healing of these racialized traumas.

The koshas, as described in a famous Tantric scripture known as the Taittiriya Upanishads, are five levels of our existence that are interrelated and entrenched in one another, and they encircle and protect our soul.

This is the framework that I utilized when working with my customer.

The more she spoke and felt heard, the more her shoulders began to relax.

We will now look into each sheath in turn to see how racial trauma shows itself.

a separator between sections When you are experiencing RBST, it is critical to take a moment to reflect on how the trauma is expressing in your life and on which koshic level it is occurring.

Even if this is difficult to ascertain, calm and intention can aid in the cultivation of that consciousness. You can begin to notice it in a variety of ways, as follows.

Annamaya Kosha (Physical Body)

Become a member of Outside+ now to have unique access to all of our articles, as well as sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and more. A 40-year-old community organizer who had come to my yoga studio as a shelter from the outer world approached me one day while I was supervising a private yoga therapy session. Standing on her mat, she sat back and shook her head slowly as tears streamed down her face. The only thing that is bothering me is fatigue. Every time I’m around them, I have to bite my tongue and adjust what I say.

  1. “I’m tired of having to filter my voice so that I don’t hurt them,” she added.
  2. ” I have chronic neck pain.
  3. When it comes to racial prejudice, bodily discomfort, mental health pressures, and spiritual crises are all common symptoms for many of my patients.
  4. It is difficult to be a Black woman in the profession of yoga therapy and teaching yoga, which is dominated by thin, white women.
  5. Students would be astonished when I brought my brown body to the front of the room to conduct the class, something I witnessed during my early years of teaching.
  6. “Wow, you’re really eloquent,” one arrogant kid exclaimed after seeing me speak.
  7. Comments like this, while apparently minor, have an impact on your mind, body, and soul, and might trigger memories of horrific events in your childhood.

Many white people are only now confronting the white supremacy and systemic inequalities that plague this country, in the midst of a pandemic that is disproportionately affecting Black communities, last summer’s uprisings in response to the murders of Breonna Taylor(sign the petition to arrest her killers), George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless others, and the recent insurrection at the Capitol.

  1. Although it is the most widespread pandemic in our communities, COVID-19 is not the most dangerous; it has just brought to light an epidemic that has been lurking for ages.
  2. Systemic disadvantages encountered by the Black community today exacerbate the effects of this ancestral trauma.
  3. In a city where African-Americans account for more than 65 percent of the population, we remain in the minority when it comes to obtaining a good quality of life for ourselves and our families.
  4. The nationwide protests in June 2020 also rekindled the traumas of the 2015 uprisings that erupted when police killed Freddie Gray in Baltimore.
  5. With every injustice, we continue to feel the pangs of our ancestors’ oppression through our DNA; while we have adapted to survive, and even thrive, ancestral trauma has a significant impact on our overall well-being, according to Dr.

To characterize the mental and emotional agony caused by interactions with racial and ethnic prejudice, racism, or hate crimes, psychologists use the term “post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).” Racially motivated traumatic stress (RBTS), also known as orracial trauma, is characterized by hypervigilance, a dysregulated nervous system, and an increase in concerns and anxieties.

  • As a result of these factors, you have a community that is subjected to unprecedented mental and physical stress and pain.
  • Race-based traumas may be recognized and processed via the practice of yoga, which can then be healed.
  • Koshas are five levels of our existence that are interrelated and immersed in one another, and they encircle our soul, according to a classic Tantric literature called the Taittiriya Upanishads.
  • With regard to my customer, this is the structure that I employed.
  • More she spoke and felt heard, the more her shoulders began to relax.
  • In the next sections, we will look at how racial trauma expresses itself in each sheath.
  • Partitioning of the body of the section In the event that you are experiencing RBST, it is critical to take a moment to reflect on how the trauma is expressing in your life and on which koshic level it is manifesting.

However, calm and intention can aid in the cultivation of this consciousness, which is not always simple to detect. You can begin to identify it in a number of ways, as follows.

How racial trauma may manifest:

  • Because of the continual state of alertness, my shoulders and rhomboids are tense. The stress of viewing the news and surfing through social media has raised my blood pressure. Attacks such as microaggressions, codeswitching, and racial profiling cause a rapid pulse due to a continually active sympathetic nervous system.

Pranamaya Kosha (Energetic/Breath Body)

The energetic sheath encompasses the function of breathing as well as your overall amount of energy.

How racial trauma may manifest:

  • When dealing with sadness as a result of a painful incident, the respiration is frequently constricted and shallow. There is a risk of anxiety as well as exacerbation of existing respiratory issues such as asthma or COPD. Having a constant awareness of how white people view you together with anxieties of appearing “too much” reduces vyana vayu (outward-radiating air), an energy life force, which limits your expression and indicates you should take up less space. (When vyana vayu is completely articulated, you are filled with a sense of completeness, wholeness, and authenticity.)
  • Because of the poor quality of sleep, people suffer from insomnia, exhaustion, and irregular sleeping patterns.

Manomaya Kosha (Mental/Emotional Body)

The mental sheath is a reflection of your emotions and ideas.

How racial trauma may manifest:

  • Anxiety, ruminations, or rushing thoughts are all possibilities. (“How should I present myself in order to be welcomed among white people?” Is it possible that I or my child may be the next to be killed? What what is going to happen in my area is a mystery. Is racism and injustice ever going to be eradicated?”)
  • Angry over the injustices and microaggressions that have occurred
  • Depression as a result of not being seen or heard
  • Deep sorrow for what your forefathers and foremothers went through, and the sadness of their loss still resides inside you
  • Frustration and/or frustration as a result of having to be the voice of Black people while also placating and educating white people

Vijnanamaya Kosha (Witness Mind-Body)

Fear, ruminations, or racing thoughts are all symptoms of panic disorder. (“How should I present myself in order to be accepted by white people? “). Do you think it’s going to be me or my child who’s next? The future of my neighborhood is a mystery. What will happen? Is racism and injustice ever going to be eradicated?” ; Displeasure with inequity and microaggressions Depression as a result of not being noticed or heard; Deep sorrow for what your forefathers and foremothers went through, and the suffering they endured is still alive in you; and I’m irritated and/or stressed out about having to speak for Black people while also appeasing and educating white folks;

How racial trauma may manifest:

  • Consciousness of seeing oneself and your group in the same light that white people do—as inferior, inept
  • Aggressive
  • Sluggish
  • Furious
  • Or a threat to white people Inability to connect with a higher power, or even unbelief in a Creator. because why would they allow such atrocities to occur?

You may learn how to connect with and feel joy and pleasure by studying the bliss sheath.

How racial trauma may manifest:

  • You’ve lost touch with the things that used to bring you delight. If you are feeling guilty about having or expressing joy while so many people in your community are suffering, you are not alone. Recognizing that happiness is futile since it is fleeting and the next injustice is imminent

a separator between sections In spite of the fact that racism will continue to be present in this nation for the foreseeable future, we may use our yoga practices to help us feel more relaxed. When we are able to adopt these practices into our daily lives on a consistent basis, we begin to strengthen the next generation of Black people. There is still much work to be done, but the koshic practices listed below can assist to guarantee that the trauma does not continue to spread across our communities, nation, and the globe.

1.Body Scan

  • Take three deep breathes in and out of your nostrils from a comfortable sitting or reclined posture, counting to three. Bringing your attention back to your physical body, without moving your body
  • Inhale and bring awareness to the following parts of your body, then slowly exhale: your head, right eye, left eye, nose, mouth, right ear, and left ear
  • Your right ear
  • Your left ear
  • Your Bring your awareness all the way down to your chest, belly, arms, and hands
  • And Continually bring your awareness to the lower half of your body, pausing at each part as follows: right hip, thigh (including all toes), knee (including all shins), calf (including all toes), ankle (including all toes), sole of foot (including all toes), heel (including all toes), and all parts of the left side.

2. Constructive Rest

  • Set up a chair or a bedside table so that you may lie down on your back on the floor and rest your legs there
  • Place your arms out to the side and take slow, deep breaths in and out. You can stay in this position for 12 breaths or for whatever long you choose

3.Svasti Mudra(Gesture of Well-Being)

  • Maintain a lofty posture and cross your forearms at your chest (right arm closest to chest). Palms should be facing away from you and away from the sides. Relax your shoulders and take a long, deep breath in and out Take note of the connection of your arms against your body and bring to mind any wounds, anger, or negativity that you may be experiencing. Take note of how you’re feeling and any stress that may be arising
  • Close your eyes and close your fists, then take another deep breath in and, as you swiftly exhale, immediately uncross your arms out to your side, releasing the thoughts and stress

4. Visualize your ancestors being happy with you and your choices

  • Close your eyes and envision an ancestor while you take three deep breaths in and out
  • Then repeat the process. Imagine their appearance, fragrance, dress, and anything else you recall about them
  • Now imagine that they are sitting directly in front of you, beaming with pride at all of the amazing decisions you have made in your life. Recognize the pride they have in you as a Black person in this world
  • As you take a deep breath, envision them wrapping a loving hug around you. Slowly open your eyes while you take a deep breath
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5. Joy List

  • Make a list of ten things that make you happy and keep it handy. Use your notes app, diary, or even sticky notes to keep track of your thoughts and ideas. While feeling annoyed by racist events, select one activity from your list to complete in order to restore your sense of well-being.

6. Breath of Joy to Release Anger

  • Lie down in a comfortable posture and take a deep breath before raising your hands to the sky. Take a deep breath and spread your hands out wide to the side. Inhale one again while elevating your hands
  • As you exhale loudly, lower your hands and fold forward in a quick motion. Repeat the process three times.

7. Waterfall Dirga Breath

  • Close your eyes or drop your gaze when in a standing or seated position and imagine that you are standing solidly on the ground
  • Inhaling deeply into your low abdomen and visualizing water travelling up the front of your body are good ways to start. Hold your breath for two counts and imagine that the water has come to a halt at the crown of your head. Take a deep breath in and visualize water pouring down your neck and back as it washes away your concerns, frustrations, and uncertainties. Repeat twice more, first inhaling into your ribs and then into your collarbone, and initiating the water flow in each of those locations.

8. Cultivating sangha with other Black people to share experiences in a safe space

  • Seek out other Black individuals at your place of employment or through virtual or in-person gatherings to build a sense of belonging. Find a yoga class taught by a fellow Black person and commit to attending on a regular basis
  • Make a difference by volunteering with local neighborhood groups to reconnect with the natural beauty of your surroundings. Pay attention to the social media profiles and websites that showcase and affirm gorgeous, confident Black individuals

Photograph courtesy of Jill Fannon Nazaahah is a person you should meet. Nazaahah Amin, MS, C-IAYT, eRYT, YACEP is a licensed yoga therapist and advanced yoga instructor in Baltimore, Maryland. She is also the proprietor of Ama Wellness, a yoga therapy studio in the West Baltimore neighborhood of the city. She graduated with honors from Maryland University of Integrative Health with a Master of Science in Yoga Therapy, and she now teaches yoga therapy classes in Baltimore City to address intergenerational trauma among Black women.

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Healing Racial Trauma Through the Koshas

Submitted byNazaahah Amin My client, a 40-year-old community organizer who had come to my yoga studio as a shelter from the outside world, approached me one day while I was supervising a private yoga therapy session. She sat on her mat, dropped her gaze, and slowly shook her head as tears streamed down her face. “I’m simply exhausted.” I’m. Company

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She is the founder and CEO of The Memo LLC, a professional development platform for women of color. She is also a Professor of Public Service at New York University Wagner and the author of The Memo (published by HarperCollins). She has been on MSNBC’s Morning Joe and Fast Company, and she has delivered keynote addresses at Fortune 500 firms such as Microsoft, Levi’s, and Google, among others.

In 2020, she will be recognized as a LinkedIn Top Voice, and in 2018, she will be recognized as one of American Express’s 25 Emerging Innovators. Her website is www.laloyolan.com.

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Statement By Dr. Gail Christopher: National Day Of Racial Healing Celebrates The Voices In America Calling For Unity And Peace

THE WASHINGTON TIMES – “The National Collaborative for Health Equity is dedicated to eliminating health disparities and assisting in the creation of circumstances that will allow all individuals to enjoy maximum health and well-being.” However, we are well aware that racism is the most significant impediment to accomplishing that goal. We are thus assisting this country in its effort to eliminate racism and its negative legacy as part of our job. The 6th annual National Day of Racial Healing is being observed today.

As a result, we need to raise our voices in support of unity and peace, as well as to engage communities in the process of learning how to view ourselves through the eyes of others who are seen as different.

It was throughout the early centuries of our country’s history, via the devastation and stealing of indigenous people’s lands, the forcible slavery of African people, and immigration policies that were predicated on this racial hierarchy, that this belief system was put into action.

Racial reconciliation

The Echo Project is being shown on national television. When Rev. David Kennedy was growing up in Laurens, South Carolina, he was forced to sit in the segregated area of his local movie theater. The Echo Theater eventually served as a Ku Klux Klan headquarters and a gathering place for hate organizations from throughout the world until the Reverend developed an odd connection with the theater’s previous owner, who agreed to sell him the land on which it stood. TODAY’s Craig Melvin investigates the theater’s turbulent past and its promising future, which includes the Reverend’s plans to re-invent the venue as part of our series Together We Rise.

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ELON University is a private research university in Elon, Ohio.

Elon community engages in ‘tough conversations’ during inaugural National Day of Racial Healing

This year’s National Day of Racial Healing was celebrated by the Office of Inclusive Excellence Education and Development (OIEED) in collaboration with the Center for Race, Ethnicity and Diversity Education (CREDE) by organizing a virtual “How We Heal” event on Tuesday, January 18. Because of the recent winter storms that devastated North Carolina, the event has been moved online. The Philadelphia Citizen is a newspaper published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Lacey Gibson is a young woman who has a lot of potential. RYT-200 The most recent update was made on September 5, 2020. Original publication date: September 02, 2020 So what is the role of yoga in making the world a more fair and socially just place to live? If your sole source of information about yoga is bleached, stick-thin, Gumby-like models on Instagram or magazine covers, it would appear that yoga’s purpose is quite restricted, if even destructive. Despite this, many devoted instructors and practitioners are aware that the practice extends beyond a purely physical level of awareness.

  1. But how do you do it?
  2. Gail Parker, Ph.D., C-IAYT, E-RYT 500, sheds light on these issues in her book, Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma(2020), in which she describes the role that Restorative Yoga can play in understanding and healing race-based emotional wounds.
  3. Within the pages of her book, she urges yoga instructors, therapists, and practitioners of all races and ethnicities to reflect more thoroughly on their own behaviors and emotions in the context of a world that has been tinted by racial and ethnic prejudice.
  4. Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Racial Stress and Trauma is a book written by Parker that offers the groundwork for understanding the healing function that Restorative Yoga may play in the healing of ethnic and racial stress and trauma.
  5. Following that, Parker discusses race-based stress and race-based trauma, as well as how they differ from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (PTSD).
  6. Parker then expands on the groundwork set in the first three chapters by delving into the ways in which yogic notions might be applied to ethnic and racial-based traumatic experiences.
  7. The use of theyamas (moral discipline that directs how we interact with the outer world) and niyamas (positive observances that concern ourselves with our own personal behavior) as guidelines in the process of building community is also discussed by her.
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Finally, Parker ends with a chapter that provides detailed guidelines for teaching and practicing Restorative Yoga in a practical setting.

It is clear from the way Parker ties together yogic philosophy, psychology, and activism in her work that she possesses extensive expertise and authority on both race-based trauma and yoga practice.

Above all, Parker makes it apparent that, before adding to the clamor of communal discourses about race-based trauma, it is most advantageous to examine one’s own experiences first and foremost.

It is Parker’s book that serves as an excellent beginning point for this difficult but vital endeavor.

She holds a Ph.D.

In 2020, she was elected to the position of President of the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance (BYTA) Board of Directors.

This book, Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma, provides self-care strategies and invites everyone, not just those who have been directly affected, to explore the intersections of yoga, race, and ethnicity and to consider the psychological impact of race-based stress and trauma on all of us, including those who have not been directly affected.

She aspires to make yoga more accessible, inclusive, and egalitarian through her teaching and writing, among other things.

In addition, she possesses a Master of Science in Global Health and Population from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where she studied public health policy. Visit her website, laceygibson.com, to discover more about her and to connect with her.

Breaking the Chain: Healing Racial Trauma in the Body

Resmaa Menakem is a trauma therapist. Photograph courtesy of N. Musinguzi Runner Ahmaud Arbery was slain on February 23 while running in a Georgia neighborhood by a white guy who was enraged by his presence. Few people were paying attention at the time, given the growing hysteria surrounding the epidemic; it took 74 days and a viral video for the killer to be apprehended and prosecuted with the crime. In the wake of Arbery’s killing, we are reminded that, even after the epidemic has passed, racial violence will continue to be an unhealed scar in American society, one that is intricately intertwined with our collective history, identity, and culture.

Menakem performs somatic therapy, which derives from the Greek word “soma,” which means “body,” and understands that emotion, memory, and trauma may be found not just in the mind but in the body.

This trauma manifests itself in our bodies, which are unconsciously sensing, remembering, and reacting to one another, influencing our behavior in ways we’re often unaware of — with often brutal consequences — as detailed in Menakem’s bookMy Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathways to Mending our Hearts and Bodies.

  1. Although we see wrath and violence on the streets of our country, the actual fight is located within our own bodies.
  2. As a crucial initial step in the work of racial reconciliation, Menakem and his colleagues emphasize cultural transformation, which begins in small groups of friends and neighbors and is accompanied by techniques to calm the nervous system as the foundation of their work.
  3. These traditions are nearly as old as human civilization itself.
  4. Menakem hosted two training sessions in Minneapolis, and I had the opportunity to speak with him over a period of many months.
  5. KM: The term “trauma” is used about a lot these days.
  6. RM: Trauma is a response to anything that is overwhelming, that occurs too frequently, too quickly, too soon, or over an excessively long period of time – especially when there is a lack of safety or support.
  7. Consider the following scenario: something terrifying is occurring to you, and you want to escape and leave, but you are unable to do so.

As time goes on, the unconscious, reflexive trauma response can manifest itself in a variety of settings, including exaggerated responses to objects, irrational fears, and avoidance methods, among other manifestations.

When this happens, the body is attempting to protect itself against the trauma occurring again in the future.

In our culture, we assume that reasoning is superior to all other considerations, but logic can’t even get its shoes on before the body begins to defend itself.

And we had to pay attention to how our body responded when that other person came too close, to see whether we had an instinct to flee, fight, or freeze when that other person got too close.

You’ll say something like, “Oh, that’s in my leg,” if we slow it down a little.

However, you must slow it down in order to properly tune into it.

KM:The discipline of epigenetics is beginning to get an understanding of the mechanisms by which trauma is handed down from generation to generation.

A well-known example is the Cherry Blossom Experiment, which was conducted in 1895.

As you might guess, they were leaping around, crawling all over each other, and behaving as though they were in imminent danger as they attempted to get free from their cage of death.

They did this for approximately one week.

Once those male mice had been shocked, they were separated and mingled with female mice who had not been shocked, after which they removed the male mice from the group to ensure that they would never have any contact with their progeny.

Although the second generation had never been subjected to an electric shock, the trauma of it had been passed on through their father’s genetic expression.

That is what we are referring to when we speak of hereditary trauma.

It’s a form of self-preservation.

RM:assume Let’s something terrible occurs to me, and you see that I’m acting a bit strangely thereafter.

“It’s time for you to see a therapist.” The fact that my conduct has changed is undeniable as a result of what transpired.

Over time — over generations — the original cause of the trauma may be forgotten or erased, but the habits will continue to be handed on from one generation to another, both via behavior and through the DNA of the individuals who exhibit them.

When a group of people suffers through a comparable trauma, the coping mechanisms they employ to deal with it are likely to be similar as well.

Traumatic retention is the term used to describe this phenomenon.

Throughout history, the Black body has been under continual pressure to deal with white body supremacy, which is the belief that the white body is the norm and that anything other is the ultimate deviation from that standard.

KM: The following passage appears in your book: “No matter what we look like, if you were born and nurtured in America, white-body dominance and our adaptations to it are in our DNA.” “Our own bodies are a repository for the unresolved discord and pain of our forefathers.” RM: Everything we breathe, see, and believe is infused with white supremacy, even the water and the air we breathe.

  • I saw that race had a role in my early work with traumatized children, but I couldn’t figure out what the relationship between the two was.
  • We are well aware of this.
  • But then I got to thinking: this research begins as soon as the children land on the planet.
  • What happens to a woman while she is pregnant is something to consider.
  • What about the adrenaline levels and the heart?
  • Is there any evidence of traumatic retention in white culture?
  • The father enters the boy’s room and tells him, “Get your clothes on; we’re going to see something.” After that, they head to a park, where there are thousands of people to watch them play.

And he’s standing there, smelling the charred flesh and witnessing the devastation and tragedy that has taken place.

However, there are thousands of additional white bodies in this room who are supporting this lynching.

However, the terror and confinement that he feels in his body are still present.

As a result, he must suppress his memories of those events.

He suppresses his feelings of uneasiness and strain.

In what ways does this vary from the way traumatic retention manifests itself in Black culture?

Whippings were not done in secret; instead, they were performed in full front of the public, including children.

Consider the scenario of a little Black girl who is taken out to observe this.

Consider what happens when the whip hits the man’s back and the child stands there helplessly as the flesh is flayed open.

As a result, this small Black child is traumatized as a result of witnessing this.

“Whupping,” as we refer to it in our group, is a product of traumatic retention, which is a retained behavior that has been decontextualized as a result of the traumatic experience.

Whipping, on the other hand, is used for a cause.

It is important to ensure that children follow the rules because violating the rules in a racist culture is harmful — but is it also important to avoid reenacting the conduct that resulted in the trauma in the first place.

Exactly.

“Post” indicates that the trauma has occurred in the past.

Here’s the issue, though: I believe we’ve reached the end of the road.

Beginning to regain ancient understandings of how the universe works, we are beginning to reclaim our own.

It is not going to happen.

White people must begin to think about how to build a culture that promotes the elimination of white supremacy in the first place.

There has been a culture developed around segregation and assimilation, but there has not been a culture built around anti-racism that has been sustained through time.

How can we cultivate a society in which white people name their children after anti-racist heroes in the tradition of their ancestors?

What are the norms of admonishment and what are the principles of acceptance in this situation?

Is it possible to teach our white children about race in a way that is open and honest, yet does not place them at the center of the discussion?

How can we cultivate the capacity to recognize when we’re taking up too much space or when we’re hiding because we’re feeling uncomfortable in our own skin?

There are a plethora of methods for white people to declare, “All right, I’m done.” Right?

You should be aware of the following: white culture is concerned primarily with the mind rather than the body.

That’s where the danger lies.

You must be willing to go to the “suffering’s edge” — that is, white people must be willing to withstand the agony and pain of truly experiencing all of the tough emotions and sensations in their body when the subject of race is brought into conversation.

A guide to body awareness methods is included in each chapter in My Grandmother’s Hands to help readers become more aware of their own somatic experience.

What does it look like when you do these things as a group?

It appears that by doing so on a constant basis, all of the unresolved issues in the past will begin to manifest themselves in the present.

It appears to be a case of keeping an eye out for the “dodges” that white people frequently use to get out of trouble: the need to seek out Black people to affirm them, weeping, collapse, or turning to rage or disdain.

The problem with white people is that they’ve never had to analyze their conceptions of race, and as a result, they don’t have many tools for navigating this territory.

Many of their actions are reactive defense reactions to their environment.

As a result, individuals are prevented from acquiring talents that they would otherwise have acquired.

They wish to distinguish themselves from people such as Donald Trump supporters and “genuine” bigots.

However, you also mention how movement-building includes activities such as cooking together, singing together, and developing relationships.

To be accountable to myself, for example, is not sufficient—what is required is accountability to the following nine generations.

In the current climate, my efforts may be in vain – I’m not looking at my own generation.

For the simple reason that, you know what?

Trauma does not determine one’s fate. And it is in this area that there is promise. We have the ability to heal one another. And as we heal from our trauma, we are able to break the pattern. We have made the decision not to pass it on to the next generation.

INTERMEDIATE 2 — Collective Resilience

Who is eligible to participate in the training? Those who have completed Intermediate 1 are eligible to enroll in this program. What will I take away from this experience? Intermediate 2 is the second of two Facilitation Modules in theCollective Resiliencecertification program, and it is the second of three modules in total. For example, in contrast to the Basic Modules, which are primarily concerned with foundational frameworks and general understandings of ideas, the Facilitation Modules are concerned with the specific practicalities of facilitating trauma-informed classes, sequences, and places.

Discussion, small and large group work, and case studies are used to train participants in the application of frameworks and tools such as developmental movement, the kosha system, trauma-informed language, and accessible asana to support self-regulation through trauma-informed classes for a diverse range of students.

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The following topics are covered in this module:

  • Asana sequencing and accessibility that is inclusive and accessible
  • Grounding, centering, direction, and breath are all sequenced in this exercise. Different nervous system and emotional states are sequenced in different ways. Trauma-informed language development
  • In group settings, trauma-informed sequencing should be used. The relationship between developmental movement and trauma-informed facilitation and sequencing
  • In terms of facilitation and sequencing, the kosha method of yoga is used.

Metabolizing Trauma Through Our Bodies – Lynn Fraser Stillpoint

It is impossible to manage trauma unless there is a clear and present focus on the body. “My Grandmother’s Hands,” says Resmaa Menakem. Since the murder of George Floyd in May, which struck me with a sickening thud in my body, I have become more deeply involved in racial justice and anti-racism issues. I began engaging in a monthly program with Resmaa Menakem, which I found to be quite beneficial. On Saturday, they highlighted Liz Koch, a yoga instructor who specializes in the psoas (core) muscle, whom I was familiar with from previous work.

  1. Being tortured on the rack was agonizing for the victims, and it was also a spectator sport for the general public to witness it.
  2. As a result of witnessing dehumanizing brutality and experiencing actual bodily assault, we have internalized the horror of being subjected to such violence.
  3. We must grieve and clean up our own mess before we can successfully oppose white solidarity and be responsible and productive members of society in an anti-racist culture.
  4. When my seventh generation great grandparents fled the Scottish Highlands after the British destroyed the clan system, they were the first in my family to arrive in North America.
  5. Liz talked about how white people are thirsty for connection, and Resmaa shared his own story of being a target of voracious white people in his own life.
  6. We are feeling the loneliness of not belonging, and we are yearning for genuine connection with others and with life.

“Dehumanization is the process through which we come to accept abuses of our basic human rights.” Defamation is the principal instrument of violence that has been employed in every genocide documented throughout history, and it is this instrument of violence that makes horrors such as slavery and human trafficking conceivable.

  1. It becomes increasingly vital, in my opinion, that we concentrate on mending our own traumas.
  2. Stop utilizing people of color as a short-cut to connecting with ourselves and one another.
  3. And we must stop demeaning one another if we are going to be able to repair the divisiveness that is currently on show in the United States of America.
  4. James Baldwin is a writer who lives in New York City.
  5. We’re apprehensive.
  6. Covid-19 has caused a rift in our sense of normalcy, and we are suffering as a result.
  7. We can learn how to govern ourselves and remain interested if we put in the effort.
  8. This is a realistic possibility.

Beginning on November 1st, Lynn Fraser will be teaching Sunday classes: Standing Firm and Having Influence in Tough Times A Practice of Being in the Present Moment We need three minutes to clear our heads.

Offerings —

Trauma cannot be handled until there is a clear and present focus on the body. “My Grandmother’s Hands,” said Resmaa Menakem. Since the murder of George Floyd in May, which struck me with a horrible thud in my body, I’ve become more fully involved in racial justice and anti-racism activism. My participation in a monthly program with Resma Menakkem began when she invited me to join her group. Liz Koch, a yoga instructor who specializes in the psoas (core) muscle, was the featured guest on Saturday’s episode.

  • Being tortured on the rack was agonizing for the victims, and it was also a spectator sport for the general public to see the act.
  • Violence that is done directly to our bodies as well as the anguish of seeing dehumanizing brutality have been stored in our minds and bodies.
  • To be responsible and productive members of society in an anti-racist culture, we must first grieve and clean up our own mess before we can successfully oppose white solidarity.
  • When my seventh generation great grandparents fled the Scottish Highlands after the British destroyed the clan system, they were the first in my family to arrive in North America.
  • In her speech, Liz discussed how white people are thirsty for connection, and Resmaa shared his own experience of being the target of greedy white people.
  • Not belonging makes us feel alone, and we yearn to experience a genuine connection with the people around us.
  • “Dehumanization is the process through which we come to accept abuses of our fundamental human rights.

By engaging in dehumanization, we are inadvertently diminishing our own humanity.” Brené Brown is a motivational speaker and author who lives in California.

We must quit “blowing our unresolved trauma through the bodies of black people” (Resmaa).

We must take responsibility for and repair our separation from ourselves and one another.

It’s possible that one of the reasons individuals hold to their hatreds so tenaciously is because they believe that if they let go of their hatreds, they would be forced to face with suffering.

This makes us feel uncomfortable.

We are suffering as a result of Covid-19’s disruption of our sense of routine.

Learning how to manage oneself and remain interested is something we can learn.

This is something that is conceivable to do.

Reese Menakem is an actress and singer from the United Kingdom.

Awareness of One’s Own Core Ms. Liz Koch is a writer and editor who lives in the United States of America. On Sundays, commencing November 1st, students will study with Lynn Fraser: In Tough Times, Staying Grounded and Strong Practicing in the Present Moment Allowing ourselves three minutes to relax

What do I need for yoga nidra?

Take a look at this list of suggested goods for further information. It is beneficial to have a yoga mat or a soft, supporting place to lay on when doing yoga (like a couch, bed, carpeted flooring, etc.) When preparing for yoga nidra, we want to feel as relaxed and comfortable as possible. It is preferable to carry out the exercise at a place that is calm, where you have solitude, and where you feel at ease. Consider creating a comfortable “nest” for yourself where you may relax and where all of your body’s parts will be supported during the duration of the practice (which can be about 1 hour).

Again, this is a very minimum, and you may easily add more if you find that it would make you feel more supported during the practice.

Last but not least, dress in attire that is loose and comfy (think pajamas, sweatpants, or similar clothes).

What is yin yoga?

In Yin Yoga, we strengthen our connective tissues while giving ourselves permission to do less and just be. It is a simple and approachable yoga practice. We may tap into the subtle patterns that exist in our life, untangle the patterns that no longer serve us, and integrate physical, spiritual, and emotional equilibrium via the practice of Yin Yoga Yogic postures that target the lower body are sustained for an extended period of time (3-5 minutes each position) with the use of props in a yin yoga session.

What do I need for yin yoga?

Take a look at this list of suggested goods for further information. In order to perform yin yoga, it is beneficial to have a yoga mat or other cushioned, supporting surface to work on. It is also beneficial to have a bolster. Instead of a bolster, use one of your large firm pillows from your bed, or a couple soft pillows from your bed (if you don’t have a large firm pillow from your bed). Additionally, it’s helpful if you have a few blankets (for savasana as well as wrapping them up for support in different positions), yoga blocks (or thick books—think Harry Potter or a similar book series), and a few yoga blocks (or thick books).

What is soulful slow flow?

A deep, heartfelt, and embodied yoga practice, Slow Flow enables you to explore on your yoga mat while providing enough support. Slow flow workshops are a great way to connect with other sisters of color while also learning to move through the present moment with self-compassion and acceptance. Slow flow is non-competitive (we are not in competition with ourselves or with others); it is a state of being. We give ourselves permission to allow the practice to meet us where we are, to feel profoundly (if that is what we need), and to breathe deeply to support our nervous system during the practice.

Through slow, deliberate movement, we may increase physical strength and assist ourselves in processing trauma that has been lodged in our bodies. In these seminars, you’ll hear music that will fill your spirit.

What do I need for soulful slow flow?

Take a look at this list of suggested goods for further information. It is necessary to have a yoga mat, a room with enough of space to move around in (around 6 feet in all directions), and clothes that you are comfortable moving around in. As an added bonus, bring a pillow or bolster to sit on, 1-2 yoga blocks (or thick books), a blanket for Savasana (last resting posture), and something to write in, either before or after class, such a journal or pen and paper (I sometimes give journal prompts).

What is Flow + Roll?

Flow + Roll is a technique that incorporates movement, breathing, and myofascial release into a well-rounded experience. An all-levels flow will be taught that will create heat and energy for the aim of strengthening, opening, and purifying both the body and mind during the class’s duration. During the final 25 minutes of class, you will explore and release high-tension areas in the body using the self-massage technique known as myofascial release—which involves the use of therapy balls to release the muscles (myo), hydrate and restore the connective tissues (fascia), and to reduce stress.

Where can I get the balls for Flow + Roll?

When it comes to Flow + Roll, I like to use Wellround balls. If you are interested in purchasing any balls from Wellround, please get in touch with me as I may be able to negotiate a discount at wholesale (resale prices, which is around $28). Alternatively, you may use my discount code: ROLLWITHERIN to purchase your balls kit online and receive $5 off your purchase (making your purchase $45 instead of $50).

What if I don’t have certain “yoga” props, what can I use instead?

For Flow + Roll, I like to use Wellround balls. For anybody interested in purchasing balls from Wellround, please get in touch with me as I may be able to negotiate a discount at wholesale (resale pricing, which are around $28). Alternatively, you may use my discount code: ROLLWITHERIN to purchase your balls kit online and receive $5 off your purchase (making your purchase $45 rather of $50).

  • If you don’t have a yoga block, use a thick book (approximately 2-3″ thick). If you don’t have a headboard, use thick, firm pillows from your bed instead. There will be no MFR balls: Tennis Balls can be substituted for the time being (a balls kit is recommended ultimately)
  • There is no eye pillow: Put rice in a sock with essential oils and knot or stitch the end close, or use a sleep mask to keep the rice warm.

How much is a drop-in class?

My drop-in fees for classes are $10 per class per person. Drop-in costs for community courses at other studios are posted on my website, but you should check with the studio where you want to attend class because fees vary and are subject to change at any time.

What if I want to come to class often?

If you attend class on a regular basis, consider signing up for the $20/month liberated sis membership, which grants you access to an unlimited number of lessons each month. If you want to attend one of my community courses on a regular basis, you should consider purchasing a class pass or a membership with one of the participating studios.

What do I wear to class?

Take advantage of the $20/mo. liberated sis subscription if you regularly attend courses and want access to an unlimited number of lessons each month. For those of you who plan to attend my community courses on a regular basis, I recommend you obtain a class pass or membership with one of the participating studios.

Do I need a yoga mat?

Soulful flow classes need the use of a yoga mat or other supporting surface of comparable design.

Yoga nidra and yin yoga do not necessitate the use of a yoga mat, however they can be beneficial. A yoga mat is required in most of the studios where I teach, with the exception of aerial yoga, which does not require one (the floors are padded like a yoga mat at aerial yoga).

Do I need to sign up for class ahead of time?

Yes! In order to ensure that you receive the connection to the live stream class on time, please sign up for live stream classes as soon as possible. Due to the restricted capacity of certain in-person yoga sessions at other yoga studios, it is recommended that you register for the class in advance.

Can I practice with an injury?

Yes! In order to ensure that you receive the connection for class on time, please sign up for live stream classes as soon as possible. It is recommended that you register for certain in-person yoga sessions at other yoga studios in advance because space is limited.

How do I access class?

Yes! Please register for live stream lessons as soon as possible to guarantee that you receive the connection to the class on time. Due to the restricted capacity of certain in-person yoga courses at other yoga studios, it is recommended that you sign up for class in advance.

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