How Dr. Gail Parker Embraces Life at Every Stage

The Golden Age of Dr. Gail

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. In Rhinebeck, New York, the weather was just beginning to warm up in the spring of 2017. I had traveled with a colleague to the Omega Institute, a holistic retreat center, in order to give a presentation at the Yoga Service Council (YSC) Conference. We were a pair of unknowing academics in the midst of a constellation of yoga superstars. The setting sun filtered into an open room filled with well-known figures from the world of yoga on the first evening of the conference: researcher Sat Bir Khalsa, PhD; clinical psychologist Melody Moore, PhD; Leslie Booker, cofounder of the Yoga Service Council; spiritual activist Teo Drake; and yoga and Buddhism teacher Jacoby Ballard, to name a few.

Everything about her looked to be composed of light: she was draped in delicate layers the colors of clouds, and her attire matched her silver locks that were fastened into a ponytail at her side.

I don’t recall her saying anything, but she exuded a strong sense of power.

And: I aspire to be someone like that.

  • In the yoga community, she is referred to as “Dr.
  • She has presented an endless number of presentations, courses, and workshops throughout the years.
  • Dr.
  • In Hindu culture, one welcomes each stage, lives it to the maximum extent possible, and then gracefully passes on to the next.
  • Parker spoke at the YSC conference about her transition from psychotherapy to teacher and mentor.
  • At a time when the world was in severe need of insight on the issue, her book Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma, was published in 2020.
  • Parker is in a great position today, at the age of 75, to impart the life lessons he has gained through study and experience.

Dr. Gail Parker has more to say: How Restorative Yoga Can Aid in the Healing of Racial Wounds On this day in 1968, Parker comes from a yoga session at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Photograph courtesy of Gail Parker is a freelance writer based in New York City.

Brahmacharya: The Student

Parker’s yoga adventure began at the Detroit Institute of Arts, which seemed like an odd place to start. According to her, “I have no idea how I ended myself in a yoga class.” The event took place one year after the Detroit riots rocked the country to its foundations. “The long hot summer” had left Parker, then 22 years old, fresh out of college, freshly married, and working as a social-welfare case worker in a city that had only recently begun to recover from the social unrest and smoldering racial tensions of “the long hot summer.” According to her, “there were no yoga studios in those days.” Yoga mats, yoga trousers, yoga podcasts, playlists, and YouTube channels are all things that are popular right now.

  1. There are no such entities.
  2. “We were instructed by a gentleman named Mr.
  3. “To instruct class, he dressed in a black suit and tie.” In front of me, she holds out a faded black-and-white photograph of her instructor.
  4. Years later, she learned that he was a direct disciple of Paramahansa Yogananda, who had taught him.
  5. Parker was a dedicated student who attended Mr.
  6. When he started a weekly meditation session, she started going as well.
  7. The book “went over my head,” she admits after attempting to read it.

When class was complete, she returned to her life as a young bride and a busy social worker, assisting single mothers, individuals who were trying to find job, and others who were trapped in a system that she knew was not meant to assist them in getting out of their circumstances of poverty.

She could scarcely confess it to herself.

She didn’t say anything about it to anyone.

It affects you as well, since you’re willing to put up with it.

She didn’t say anything, but for some reason, he didn’t strike her that day, and he never touched her again after that.

That stage of her life had come to an end.

“I had taken control of my destiny.” According to her, the sense of tranquility she had in her yoga session served as a wake-up call to the reality that her home life was anything from tranquil.

Grihastha: The Householder

In addition to telling Parker to go, the same voice gave her precise instructions on what she should do next: ‘You need to get a divorce, you need to go back to school, and you need to go on with your life,’ says the entity, according to her. “I couldn’t just turn around and leave,” she adds. For those who are in abusive relationships, this is practically difficult, and in some cases, dangerous. ‘I needed to properly organize my departure,’ I explained. She submitted an application to graduate school and got admitted.

  1. She booked a studio apartment for the duration of her stay.
  2. Along the way, she discovered a new love in the form of a dashing doctor.
  3. She continued to practice yoga as a solitary home practice until the 1990s, when the first yoga studios opened their doors.
  4. When she was younger, she practiced Ashtanga Yoga, followed by Anusara Yoga “before anyone really even understood what it was” (and well before its founder was embroiled in scandal).
  5. The reason she wasn’t teaching yoga to her customers, she explains, was that “they weren’t coming to me for that.” I understood how to instruct them on how to deepen their breathing if they were practicing high-chest breathing, though.
  6. She learnt about restorative yoga while she was there, which helped to bring her professional and personal lives even closer together.
  7. “You will begin to recognize and realize that you are so much more than all of the external things that you’ve become attached to.” Many of Parker’s clients were struggling with the unique stressors that come with being a member of a disadvantaged community.
  8. She had first-hand knowledge of what she was talking about.

The first Black woman on university, she recalls, “I was the first Black person to dwell in the dorms and the only Black lady on campus.” She no longer speaks the name of the university since she found the experience of being isolated so painful: “It was a horrible four years.” Restorative yoga evolved into a technique to assist her in healing racial and emotional traumas, as well as those of her students.

The knowledge she gained from her studies in yoga therapy programs, from colleagues at the Symposium on Yoga Therapy and Research (SYTAR), from instructors at the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance (BYTA) Conference, and from anyplace else she could was passed on to others.

Photograph courtesy of Lorenzo Wilkins is an American football player who plays for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Yoga as a Peace Practice is a program meant to help individuals heal from trauma and the consequences of violence in their communities.

“Activism is a lot of work,” Parker admits. “It’s impossible to accomplish it without engaging in restorative practices that keep you healthy.” She no longer sees herself as a frontline combatant, but rather as a caretaker for those who are on the front lines.

Vanaprastha: The Sage

An unexpected sewage overflow forced Parker out of her psychotherapy business in 2015. She had been contemplating shutting down her practice when the storm occurred. Her desire for encouragement to close the door was fulfilled, yet her schedule is as hectic as ever these days. Aside from serving on the Board of Directors of the Black Yoga Teachers Association, she is enjoying the popularity of her book and is working on a companion how-to guide for reducing race-based stress and trauma via yoga.

In the words of Pamela Stokes Eggleston, the founder of Yoga2Sleep, “She’s a fantastic mentor.” In 2010, when Eggleston was appointed as co-executive director of the Yoga Service Council, Parker assisted her by providing “quite intelligent guidance and counsel,” according to Eggleston.

Sannyasa: The Seeker of Enlightenment

Parker and her husband now split their time between Michigan and California, the latter of which is warmer and allows Parker to be closer to her son, who is now an immigration attorney. She is in the fortunate position of being in excellent health, confident in her love, generally regarded, and lacking any need to prove anything to anyone. She chooses the projects she works on based on her position in the organization. She schedules time for reflective practice as well as time to ponder the events and serendipities that have brought her to this point in her journey through life.

According to her, “I recognized that I’m also a role model for what aging can genuinely look like, feel like, and be, and I’m not just talking about physically.” “I’m referring to the process of accepting, embracing, and cherishing one’s adulthood.” Photo courtesy of Nolwen Cifuentes Finding balance is essential in yoga, as it is in everything else.

“I’m 75 years old,” I say.

“As I grow older, I discover more and more of myself.

RestorationRevival

Gail Parker knows the therapeutic power of rest and relaxation. She has dedicated her life to it. It is not true that nothing is occurring just because you are not doing anything, according to her. “Have faith in your body’s ability to operate properly and restore itself to equilibrium. “As long as the nervous system remains calm, the body has the ability to function as a self-healing organism,” she explains. Tamara Y. Jeffries, RYT-200, is a senior editor at Yoga Journal and a certified yoga instructor.

You may follow her on Instagram. In addition to being a photographer and filmmaker who was born and bred in Southern California, Nolwen Cifuentes currently resides and works in Los Angeles. Nolwen is one of the photographers featured in the book The 30: New and Emerging Photographers to Watch.

Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma: An Interview with Gail Parker

Lacey Gibson Ramirez RYT-200 is a RYT-200 certified instructor. The most recent update was made on October 18, 2020. Original publication date: August 29, 2020 The Dr. Gail Parker (Ph.D., C-IAYT, E-RYT 500) is a nationally and internationally recognized thought leader in the field of psychology, certified yoga therapist, and E-RYT 500 certified instructor. In this interview, Yoga U contributing writer Lacey Gibson Ramirez speaks with Gail about her new book, Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma, which she co-wrote with her husband, David.

  • What was it that spurred you on to begin practicing yoga?
  • Because of a stroke of luck, I happened to come across a yoga class being offered at the local art museum.
  • My teacher taught a very gentle form of postural yoga, as well as a Sunday service in which he would read from Paramahansa Yogananda’s Sunday Service lectures and then lead us in meditation, both of which I found to be extremely beneficial.
  • Yoga has assisted me in healing my body, mind, heart, and spirit for more than five decades.
  • I wasn’t aware of it at the time, but my yoga teacher was widely regarded as one of Yogananda’s most important disciples; I was being introduced to yoga through the teachings of a great spiritual leader.
  • To have been able to establish a personal home practice from the very beginning proved to be a blessing in disguise.
  • Lacey Gibson Ramirez is a model and actress.
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Gail Parker (interviewer): I’ve returned to my regular home practice schedule.

Your relationship to the physicality of yoga shifts as a result of this.

Your spiritual practice was being supported by the postures, which were simply there to assist you in going deeper into it.

Lacey Gibson Ramirez is a model and actress.

Gail Parker (interviewer): When I decided to pursue yoga teacher training, I was already working as a licensed psychologist.

Restorative Yoga was first introduced to me at this location.

Through personal experience, it encourages people to recognize that “Oh, my feelings are in my body, my stress is in my body, not in my mind,” as the saying goes.

It’s not a fabrication on your part.

Restorative Yoga has the potential to aid in the development of an inner gaze, and it has the ability to impact the nervous system in a way that brings it back into balance, resulting in an experience of equanimity.

Lacey Gibson Ramirez is a model and actress.

The technique assists me in identifying the areas of my body where I am contracted, the areas of my body where I feel a sense of release and relaxation, as well as the areas of my body where I feel a sense of peacefulness, calm, and restfulness.

There are five aspects to one’s being that can be integrated with this technique: one’s physical being, one’s breath being, one’s emotional being, one’s intuitive being, and one’s spiritual being.

Due to the fact that you remain still throughout the practice, you have the opportunity to delve deeper into the silence.

Even though there were times when I wanted to jump out of my skin, the practice helps you learn to be comfortable with remaining still, even when you are feeling uncomfortable.

I recall a period of my life during which I was plagued by feelings of fear and anxiety in abundance.

Nothing worked.

One day, I realized I couldn’t do it any longer and decided to give up.

My mind recalls being in Savasana and feeling a burst of energy rush through my body.

And then it was no longer there.

In the years since then, I haven’t had much reason to be afraid.

How did you get the idea for Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma in the first place?

The decision to close my practice occurred at the same time as Michael Brown’s death.

The need for interventions was urgently needed to assist people in coping with their own stress and trauma, as well as the genuine fear and vulnerability that people felt in the wake of these racially motivated violent acts.

However, there has been no research or trauma-informed yoga therapy practices that I am aware of to support recovery from Race-Based Traumatic Stress (RBTS).

The primary stressor associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a life-threatening event.

The most important stressor in the development of Race-Based Traumatic Stress is any external race-related event that results in emotional harm.

The responses to the emotional injury are not regarded as disorders, but rather as normal responses to an emotionally painful experience, according to the literature.

A publisher approached me in 2018 after I delivered a plenary speech and led a workshop at the International Association of Yoga Therapists’ annual Symposium on Yoga Therapy and Research conference on the topic of yoga therapy’s potential to support stress reduction and recovery from Race-Based Traumatic Stress.

  1. As a result, my book, Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma, came to be published.
  2. In writing Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma, what was the most difficult aspect to overcome?
  3. As I shared experiences of racial wounding I’ve had — some from the past, some from the present — and that other people have also had, it brought up painful memories for me to be open, honest, and authentic.
  4. Lacey Gibson Ramirez: What do you hope that readers take away from Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma?
  5. I’ve gotten a lot of feedback, and the feedback that I’m getting from people about what they are getting out of this book is that it’s all deeply personal to them.
  6. If it’s your experience, it’s real, and you know it’s real.
  7. Because it’s your experience.

That, I think, is an important lesson.

Lacey Gibson Ramirez is a model and actress.

Gail Parker: When I began to practice yoga, it was not an industry.

So, when I’m teaching, I’m sharing a practice.

When it is a complete practice, when you’re following the yamas and the niyamas, when you’re doing breath practices, when you’re meditating, and you’re practicing some form of asana, you’re taking really good care of yourself.

I do not have any insight into the future of yoga as an industry.

Gail Parker: I’m glad that the conversation is opening so that we can begin to talk about and validate one another’s experiences.

We have fantastic tools that we can utilize to help each other in our feeling of wellness to establish welcoming communities to support each of us in being who we are.

That, in my opinion, is what yoga should be about.

Gail Parker, Ph.D., C-IAYT, RYT-500, is an author, a psychologist, a trained yoga therapist, and a lifetime practitioner of yoga.

in psychology and a certification in yoga therapy.

Her attempts to integrate psychology, yoga, and meditation as effective self-care practices that help improve emotional balance and contribute to the general health and well-being of practitioners have earned her widespread recognition.

Lacey Gibson Ramirez is an ERYT-200 yoga instructor and freelance writer residing in Boston, Massachusetts.

Prenatal Yoga and Barre certifications, as well as trauma-informed yoga trainings, are among Lacey’s many accomplishments.

In addition, she possesses a Master of Science in Global Health and Population from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where she studied public health policy. Visit her website, laceygibson.com, to discover more about her and to connect with her.

Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma – Kindle edition by Parker, Gail, Ross, Justine, Raheem, Octavia F., Wheeler, Amy. Health, Fitness & Dieting Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

Dr. Parker has given the world a beautiful and compelling book that is full of insights, challenges, and rays of hope. She brilliantly ties together the realms of yoga, healing, trauma, and culture in a way that is both straightforward and compelling. The techniques provide you with a fresh perspective on the term “yoga.” You’re not addressing the kleshas of culture, are you? Then go out and buy the book! – Matthew J. Taylor, PT, PhD, C-IAYT, director of SmartSafeYoga, past president of the International Association of Yoga Therapists, and international authority on pain and yoga safety.

  • Gail Parker has done throughout her career.
  • Everyone who is interested in health, healing, and harmony will find this book to be a riveting read!
  • Later, in her professional life as a psychologist, she grew to appreciate the therapeutic potential of Restorative Yoga’s silence.
  • It requires that we be honest with ourselves and with others, and that we no longer suppress or repress our own or others’ sorrow.
  • The author of Laughing in the Dark, Patrice Gaines, says it best: Dr.
  • Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race Based Stress and Traumais a comprehensive resource that educates instructors and practitioners for the spiritual process of healing racial traumas.
  • – Desiree Cooper, author, Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist, and fighter for women’s rights and equality.

When it comes to race-based microaggressions and bigger traumatic incidents, Dr Gail Parker provides an interesting explanation of the cumulative impact that they may have on the nervous system and state of mind.

Podcast hosted by Rane Bowen and Jo Stewart, The Flow Artists A contemporary and profound search for commonality in a racist society that is full of divisions.

Accepting our inner connectivity and challenging the personal and social ideas that separate us are necessary steps toward healing.

Let’s get this dialogue started!

in Architecture This is a transformational book that is not only for yoga practitioners.

Gail Parker explains how we all contribute to and suffer from racial trauma via the lens of yoga philosophy, research, and personal experience.

– Helen Avery, yoga instructor and journalist who covers diversity and inclusion Simply expressed, Dr.

Empowering.

Life-changing!

Parker has given us a gift that will last a lifetime!

See also:  Talking Clean Beauty with YJ Makeup Artist Beth Walker

Afterwards, she leads us down a road of HOPE, one that is based in the inner labor of “self-study” and the “healing balm” of Restorative Yoga, both of which she teaches.

Parker.

Despite the fact that I could connect with her anguish, I was equally affected by her compassion, exceptional insights, and the wisdom she willingly shares with others.

Gail Parker is a gifted speaker with an intuitive and open heart.

Power Your Heart, You Power Your Mind: Self-Study Then Build a Bridge to Someone Else, by Paula Christian Kliger, PhD, psychologist, psychoanalyst, and organizational consultant, author of Power Your Heart, You Power Your Mind: (SEDA Press, 2018) In a time when we are all involved in a crucial discourse, Gail Parker’s significant work offers a welcome entrance into that conversation.

  • Editor in Chief of Yoga Therapy Today (Laurie Hyland Robertson) Since 1992, Gail Parker has been a dependable and valued colleague of mine.
  • With this book, she brings together decades of experience to provide a roadmap for yoga teachers and practitioners on how to change yoga into a welcoming environment for everyone.
  • Jackson, says: With her expertise as a psychologist, researcher, yoga trainer and storyteller, Dr.
  • She encourages people to address their own racial wounded while also drawing attention to the need for deep healing among those who perpetrate race-based violence against others.
  • The Executive Director of the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance, Jana Long, says: This book, which is both powerful and compassionately written, seeks to break the silence that our culture maintains on issues of race, ethnicity, oppression, and other forms of inequality.
  • Gail Parker seamlessly weaves together scientific research, psychological theory, yoga philosophy, and spiritual action to demonstrate the need of racial unity in a diverse society, as well as the value of performing the inner work that helps us attain it.
  • It is a must-read for everyone, including those who have benefited from privilege and those who have suffered from it.

– Bo Forbes, Psy.D., is a psychologist, yoga instructor, and author of Yoga for Emotional Balance (Yoga for Emotional Balance).

Parker has provided a succinct, open, and yet non-confrontational look into the matter.

A book on how the tools of yoga may help heal race-based stress and trauma is not all that this book is – it is also an invitation to dig into our own psyche and heart, as well as the shoes of others, in order to see clearly through the veils of illusion.

Additionally, I strongly suggest this book for any yoga instructor, since it is critical to understand where students may be coming from and how to assist in supporting wholeness rather than adding to separation and suffering, whether deliberately or unwittingly.

Parker writes from the perspective of a lady who grew up during the Jim Crow era, which was characterized by some of the cruelest, harshest, and most unjust moments in American history.

A meditation and yoga instructor, she has a lot of experience.

She is a truth-seeker who wishes for everyone of us to discover our own truth.

We should all express our gratitude to her for guiding us along this path.

Boone of the Richmond Free Press says: Our racially segregated society has harmed not only people of color, but all of us as well.

In this book, she asks us to face our race-based stress and trauma—without guilt or blame—and then offers compassionate, scientifically-based healing solutions.

– Tamara Jeffries, yoga instructor, journalism professor at Bennett College, and former executive editor of Essence magazine.

But, when Dr.

For everyone who is dedicated to any level of social justice, this book is a must-read in order to heal not just oneself, but also to assist in the healing of others.

Dr.

Dr.

This is the book that we have all been looking forward to reading.

A love giving of simple life-changing skills to help us heal and improve ourselves and our communities, this book is a gift from the author to you. Dr. Terry Harris, Co-founder of The Collective STL- The term “paperbackedition” is used in this work.

Book Description

Provides a therapeutic approach to yoga that is informed by race- The term “paperbackedition” is used in this work.

Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma: Parker, Gail: 9781787751859: Amazon.com: Books

Dr. Parker has given the world a beautiful and compelling book that is full of insights, challenges, and rays of hope. She brilliantly ties together the realms of yoga, healing, trauma, and culture in a way that is both straightforward and compelling. The techniques provide you with a fresh perspective on the term “yoga.” You’re not addressing the kleshas of culture, are you? Then go out and buy the book! – Matthew J. Taylor, PT, PhD, C-IAYT, director of SmartSafeYoga, past president of the International Association of Yoga Therapists, and international authority on pain and yoga safety.

  1. Gail Parker has done throughout her career.
  2. Everyone who is interested in health, healing, and harmony will find this book to be a riveting read!
  3. Later, in her professional life as a psychologist, she grew to appreciate the therapeutic potential of Restorative Yoga’s silence.
  4. It requires that we be honest with ourselves and with others, and that we no longer suppress or repress our own or others’ sorrow.
  5. The author of Laughing in the Dark, Patrice Gaines, says it best: Dr.
  6. Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race Based Stress and Traumais a comprehensive resource that educates instructors and practitioners for the spiritual process of healing racial traumas.
  7. – Desiree Cooper, author, Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist, and fighter for women’s rights and equality.

When it comes to race-based microaggressions and bigger traumatic incidents, Dr Gail Parker provides an interesting explanation of the cumulative impact that they may have on the nervous system and state of mind.

Podcast hosted by Rane Bowen and Jo Stewart, The Flow Artists A contemporary and profound search for commonality in a racist society that is full of divisions.

Accepting our inner connectivity and challenging the personal and social ideas that separate us are necessary steps toward healing.

Let’s get this dialogue started!

in Architecture This is a transformational book that is not only for yoga practitioners.

Gail Parker explains how we all contribute to and suffer from racial trauma via the lens of yoga philosophy, research, and personal experience.

– Helen Avery, yoga instructor and journalist who covers diversity and inclusion Simply expressed, Dr.

Empowering.

Life-changing!

Parker has given us a gift that will last a lifetime!

Afterwards, she leads us down a road of HOPE, one that is based in the inner labor of “self-study” and the “healing balm” of Restorative Yoga, both of which she teaches.

Parker.

Despite the fact that I could connect with her anguish, I was equally affected by her compassion, exceptional insights, and the wisdom she willingly shares with others.

Gail Parker is a gifted speaker with an intuitive and open heart.

Power Your Heart, You Power Your Mind: Self-Study Then Build a Bridge to Someone Else, by Paula Christian Kliger, PhD, psychologist, psychoanalyst, and organizational consultant, author of Power Your Heart, You Power Your Mind: (SEDA Press, 2018) In a time when we are all involved in a crucial discourse, Gail Parker’s significant work offers a welcome entrance into that conversation.

  • Editor in Chief of Yoga Therapy Today (Laurie Hyland Robertson) Since 1992, Gail Parker has been a dependable and valued colleague of mine.
  • With this book, she brings together decades of experience to provide a roadmap for yoga teachers and practitioners on how to change yoga into a welcoming environment for everyone.
  • Jackson, says: With her expertise as a psychologist, researcher, yoga trainer and storyteller, Dr.
  • She encourages people to address their own racial wounded while also drawing attention to the need for deep healing among those who perpetrate race-based violence against others.
  • The Executive Director of the Black Yoga Teachers Alliance, Jana Long, says: This book, which is both powerful and compassionately written, seeks to break the silence that our culture maintains on issues of race, ethnicity, oppression, and other forms of inequality.
  • Gail Parker seamlessly weaves together scientific research, psychological theory, yoga philosophy, and spiritual action to demonstrate the need of racial unity in a diverse society, as well as the value of performing the inner work that helps us attain it.
  • It is a must-read for everyone, including those who have benefited from privilege and those who have suffered from it.

– Bo Forbes, Psy.D., is a psychologist, yoga instructor, and author of Yoga for Emotional Balance (Yoga for Emotional Balance).

Parker has provided a succinct, open, and yet non-confrontational look into the matter.

A book on how the tools of yoga may help heal race-based stress and trauma is not all that this book is – it is also an invitation to dig into our own psyche and heart, as well as the shoes of others, in order to see clearly through the veils of illusion.

Additionally, I strongly suggest this book for any yoga instructor, since it is critical to understand where students may be coming from and how to assist in supporting wholeness rather than adding to separation and suffering, whether deliberately or unwittingly.

Parker writes from the perspective of a lady who grew up during the Jim Crow era, which was characterized by some of the cruelest, harshest, and most unjust moments in American history.

A meditation and yoga instructor, she has a lot of experience.

She is a truth-seeker who wishes for everyone of us to discover our own truth.

We should all express our gratitude to her for guiding us along this path.

Boone of the Richmond Free Press says: Our racially segregated society has harmed not only people of color, but all of us as well.

In this book, she asks us to face our race-based stress and trauma—without guilt or blame—and then offers compassionate, scientifically-based healing solutions.

– Tamara Jeffries, yoga instructor, journalism professor at Bennett College, and former executive editor of Essence magazine.

See also:  Scott Shute: Align Your Work With Your True Purpose

But, when Dr.

For everyone who is dedicated to any level of social justice, this book is a must-read in order to heal not just oneself, but also to assist in the healing of others.

Dr.

Dr.

This is the book that we have all been looking forward to reading. A love giving of simple life-changing skills to help us heal and improve ourselves and our communities, this book is a gift from the author to you. In the words of Dr. Terry Harris, co-founder of The Collective STL:

Book Description

Provides a therapeutic approach to yoga that is informed by race.

Dr. Gail Parker On How Yoga Can Help Heal Racial Trauma

When I discovered yoga more than 14 years ago, my practice immediately evolved into a vehicle for personal growth and development. Because embodied white supremacy disconnects us from ourselves, yoga continues to center me while I manage racism in the United States. Yoga is the only way I can maintain self-connection in the face of racism. However, at the heart of my practice is a profound dedication to co-creating places for other Black people to flourish via the practice of yoga and dance. It is my belief that healing and inner change begin when we are able to process our experiences, reconnect with ourselves, and breathe in a safe and comfortable environment.

  • Having said that, it gives me great comfort to know that I’m a member of a long line of Black and brown yoga instructors in the United States who have utilized their practice to assist people reconnect with their own identities.
  • When Dr.
  • It was 1968, only a few months after the Detroit riots and the killing of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Doctor Parker describes his experience as “tuning into that higher dimension of being and freedom that dwells inside.” “I’m sorry, but I can’t describe it any better than that.” Articles that may interest you As a therapist, Dr.

However, while her first book, Transforming Ethnic and Race-Based Traumatic Stress with Yoga, is primarily concerned with the theoretical impact of racism on people’s lives, her most recent book, Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma, provides readers with practical steps to relieve race-based traumatic stress in the body.

  • Parker’s work teaches us how to make room for discomfort since acknowledging and experiencing all of our emotions is an important part of the healing process.
  • Parker, who spoke about her 40-year yoga practice, the role of silence in healing, and the necessity of both personal development and community care.
  • Gail, your research focuses on the use of yoga to reduce the effects of trauma.
  • Dr.
  • Some describe it as having a twisted stomach or feeling like they’ve taken a gut punch.
  • Rather than denying or avoiding the discomfort in your body by self-medicating, the goal is to feel whatever you are experiencing in your body.
  • Self-care is not a sign of being self-indulgent.

-Gail Parker, PhD, author Is it possible to use quiet to aid us in our healing process?

As a result, we have become acclimated to the situation and are unaware that we are under stress in the first place.

We are retraining the nervous system to feel comfortable in the presence of silence.

Under order to avoid becoming overstimulated, it is done in low light conditions.

Conscious breathing in stillness activates the parasympathetic nerve system, which is the component of our bodies that helps us slow down and relax, bringing us into a state of rest and comfort.

What function do affirmations have in your healing practice and how do you use them?

You are under no obligation to accept it.

Just keep saying it, just keep saying it, just keep saying it.

And ultimately, you’ll experience an energetic internal resonance that will take you off your feet.

It is not a mental process; rather, it is a visceral sensation of upliftment.

What is the significance of self-care, particularly for Black women?

We look after everyone and everything else while neglecting to look after ourselves since we don’t have the time to do so.

But here’s what I have to say: Self-care is not a sign of being self-indulgent.

If I’m looking for myself and you’re looking after yourself, we’re both contributing members of the community.

Take all you have and fill yourself to bursting, and then offer from a position of energy where, you know, when I have more than enough to give, I will give it.

You already are, regardless of who you’re attempting to become.

For the sake of clarity, this interview has been trimmed and condensed.

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Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities

Greg has been actively involved in the Wisconsin Youth Leadership Forum for many years and is a recent graduate of Partners in Policymaking (formerly known as Partners in Government). He formerly served as the town administrator of Monico and is presently a volunteer fireman. In my case, I have a disability, but I have chosen not to let my condition to rule my life. Barbara Beckert is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and Disability Rights As the Executive Director of Disability Rights Wisconsin, Barbara has spent many years campaigning for people with disabilities in her role as an advocate.

“All of us have a role to play in assisting persons with disabilities to lead fulfilling lives!” kevin coughlinDepartment of Health Services, University of Wisconsin Kevin is a Policy Initiative Advisor with the Division of Medicaid Services, where he has worked since 2007.

The opportunity to serve on the Board of Directors and cooperate with the numerous partners to improve services for our Wisconsin people is an honor for me.

Milwaukee Patrick is a strong advocate for himself.

He would like to expand the number of people that support him.

Desi is resolved to live a totally self-sufficient existence in the future.

Ashley is a disability advocate who has given speeches all throughout the state of Wisconsin on behalf of people with special needs and disabilities.

“Cross out the Dis and Embrace the Ability,” she says in her credo.

In addition to serving as the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction’s associate director of special education, Daniel Parker also serves as the Board’s point of contact with the Department of Public Instruction.

As a Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Nathan helps people find jobs.

She is also a former participant in the Partners in Policymaking program.

In addition, I would want to see services expanded in rural areas throughout the state.” george zaske is a fictional character created by author George Zaske.

“I want to raise awareness among the general public about how much persons with disabilities can contribute to the well-being of our communities,” says the author.

Gail Bovy is a parent of a kid with special needs and an outspoken disability advocate on a national scale.

Pam works as a financial expert, is the mother of a kid who has a developmental impairment, and is an advocate for people with disabilities.

Cheryl Funmaker Wisconsin Dells is a popular tourist destination.

My mother is of Ho-Chunk descent, while my father is of Standing Rock Sioux descent.

In collaborative initiatives that help individuals with disabilities, I will continue to fight for cultural sensitivity and equity lenses, which I believe are essential.

PADRES E HIJOS EN ACCION is the organization he founded and serves as its Executive Director.

“I view the Board of Directors as a chance to achieve this objective.” Andy Thain has cerebral palsy and is a self-advocate in the disability community.

The caregiver shortage, as well as difficulties around integrated employment for individuals with disabilities, are two topics that he is particularly interested in.

Amy Whitehead is a writer who lives in New York City.

“I became interested in this topic as a result of my own experience as the mother of a child with a developmental handicap.

I hope that my personal experience as a caregiver and family member of someone who has a handicap would enable me to advocate on his and others’ behalf as a result of my own experience.

As a member of the BPDD board, Sydney represents the interests of self-advocates.

She is a graduate of Partners in Policymaking, and in December of this year, she began working as a crisis counselor with Crisis Text Line.

kedibonye carpenterla crosse kedibonye carpenterla crosse Kibonye is the mother of a disabled kid and works as an investigator for the Wisconsin-based disability rights organization Disability Rights Wisconsin.

She thinks that by working together and identifying our shared causes, we can accomplish great things.

Meredith works as a workforce development specialist for the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.

“I realized that strong advocacy and self-determination skills are extremely crucial for those with impairments,” says the author.

She serves as a self-advocate on the Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities, where she represents her community (BPDD).

In the context of my personal disability-related life experience, I contribute my distinctive voice and viewpoint to this platform, which I will put to good use as a spokesman for my community.” Tricia serves on the Board of Directors as a family member/caregiver representative.

She has a thorough understanding of the difficulties that persons with disabilities and non-traditional caregivers may face from time to time.

It’s a part of the state that, in my opinion, is sometimes underestimated or underappreciated. Concerning disability policy, my particular favorite areas include ADA compliance, transportation challenges, and the caregiving dilemma, among others.

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