How Mental Health Professionals Use Yoga to Stay Sane

How Mental Health Professionals Use Yoga to Stay Sane

There’s no entertaining way to put it: While COVID has seen an increase in anxiety and depression rates, pandemic-related mental health illnesses such as persistent anxiety and evenZoom tiredness have exacerbated feelings of depletion, isolation, and worry among those who have been affected. According to Kaiser Family Foundation study, one in every ten persons had symptoms of anxiety or depression a year and a half ago, and today that figure has increased to one in every four, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

For setting limits, maintaining self-care, and preventing burnout, they share their tips on how to use movement, meditation, and yoga philosophy to your advantage.

Rest, and Restorative Yoga, to the Rescue

In all seriousness, there is no entertaining way to put it: While COVID has seen an increase in anxiety and depression rates, pandemic-related mental health problems such as persistent anxiety and evenZoom tiredness have exacerbated feelings of depletion, isolation, and worry among survivors. According to data conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, one in every ten persons showed symptoms of anxiety or depression a year and a half ago, and today that figure has increased to one in every four, according to the research.

For setting limits, maintaining self-care, and keeping away from burnout, they share their tips on how to use movement, meditation, and yogic philosophy effectively.

  • The author of Restorative Yoga for Ethnic and Race-Based Stress and Trauma, Gail Parker, will provide classes on embodied psychology. Classes and trainings with Tracee Stanley, author of Radiant Rest: Yoga Nidra for Deep Relaxation and Awakened Clarity
  • And classes and trainings with other teachers. Ashley Turner, a certified therapist and the creator of Yoga Psyche, will be teaching classes and leading seminars. Yoga Psychology for the Soul is a training program for yoga instructors and therapists. a series of classes and professional trainings with Melody Moore, PhD, a clinical psychologist and yoga instructor who specializes in compassion-focused programs for mental health professionals and yoga instructors

Read All About It

Coral Brown has more than 20 years of experience as a yoga instructor and trainer, as well as a registered mental health counselor. She has worked in both disciplines for more than 20 years. She sees between 20 to 25 clients every week, in addition to maintaining a schedule of online yoga courses and workshops for her students. Brown runs virtually every day as a type of active meditation to help her keep grounded, and she believes that being versed in yoga philosophy helps her be present and resourced for clients, students, and herself as a teacher.

  • The term “practice” is the most important.
  • Even the very first yoga sutra, Atha yoganusasanam, speaks of the need of devotion to practice and lifelong study.
  • Brown cites the ancient tale of a guy who witnesses a snake in the corner of his chamber and spends the rest of the night on high alert, which is taken from the Upanishads, the original yogic literature.
  • According to her, the more time we spend practicing, the more we will see that mindfulness, stopping, and breathing assist us in determining where the line between true danger and pain is drawn.

Here are Brown’s favorite yoga books, which go beyond the Sutra, Bhagavad Gita, and Upanishads to offer yogic insight and a neuroscience approach to embodiment and connection.

  • Licensed mental health counselor Coral Brown has more than 20 years of expertise in both the field of yoga and the field of mental health counseling. During the week, she meets between 20 to 25 clients while also maintaining a schedule of online yoga courses and workshops for her students. Brown runs virtually every day as a sort of active meditation to help her keep grounded, and she believes that being versed in yoga philosophy helps her be present and resourced for clients, students, and herself as a practitioner. In the sacred writings, she explains, “you can see that yoga is an embodiment practice that provides us with the chance to learn self-regulation.” The crucial term here is practice. According to Brown, it takes time and effort to develop the ability to tone your nervous system to the point where you can recognize when you are out of sync with yourself. Dedication to practice and ongoing learning are emphasized in the very first yoga sutra (Atha yoganusasanam). Stress may be dealt with more effectively if your nervous system is toned. This means that your initial response to stress will no longer be a basic fight, flee, or freeze response. Brown cites the ancient tale of a man who witnesses a snake in the corner of his chamber and spends the rest of the night on high alert, which may be found in the Upanishads, the source of yoga. Come morning, he discovers that the snake was nothing more than a piece of string. According to her, the more time we spend practicing, the more we will see that mindfulness, stopping, and breathing assist us in determining the difference between genuine danger and pain. The following are Brown’s favorite yoga books for tapping into yogic knowledge and a neuroscience approach to embodiment and connection, in addition to the Sutra, Bhagavad Gita, and Upanishads

The long-term effects of COVID-19 on your mental health are covered in more detail here (Cedars-Sinai) The consequences of COVID-19 for mental health and substance abuse are discussed below (KFF)

Yoga as a practice tool

What was previously considered a privileged practice for a select few has now become commonplace in the United States: According to a poll conducted by Yoga Journal last year, more than 15 million persons in the United States currently practice yoga, and it should come as no surprise that research has found it to have physical advantages. A number of studies have found that the practice, which combines stretching and other exercises with deep breathing and meditation, can increase general physical fitness as well as strength, flexibility, and lung capacity, while also lowering heart rate, blood pressure, and lower back discomfort.

  1. Several recent research show that yoga can help to enhance social ties, reduce stress, and alleviate symptoms of anxiety, sadness, and sleeplessness, among other things.
  2. “The research shows that yoga is effective in changing people on many levels,” says Kelly McGonigal, PhD, a Stanford University health psychologist and yoga instructor.
  3. In order to help clients manage with stress and anxiety outside of the therapy office, they are promoting yoga as a tool that they can utilize at home or in the workplace.
  4. “Talk therapy can be helpful in finding problem-solving strategies and understanding your own strengths and what’s happening to you, but there are times when you just need to kind of get moving and work through the body,” she says.
  5. 28, No.
  6. Glied, PhD, professor of health policy and management at Columbia University, and Richard G.
  7. These populations had approximately the same percentage increases in the use of psychotropic medications over this time period as did the general population.

Sat Bir Khalsa, a neuroscientist and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston who studies yoga’s effects on depression and insomnia.

48, No.

48, No.

His explanation for this is that it reduces the stress response, which involves the activity of the sympathetic nervous system as well as cortisol levels, which are elevated under stressful situations.

While scientists are still trying to figure out exactly how yoga does all of this, new research is beginning to provide light on the ways in which the practice may have an impact on the brain.

The findings were published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (Vol.

4) in 2007.

Participants in the reading group maintained their GABA levels.

Several studies, including one by McGonigal of Stanford University, confirm Khalsa’s assertions about the social advantages of participation in a yoga session.

20, No.

“I think one of the underappreciated mechanisms that yoga can really help with is giving people a sense of belonging, of being a part of something bigger,” McGonigal says.

Women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who participated in eight sessions of a 75-minute Hatha yoga class experienced significantly reduced PTSD symptoms when compared to those who participated in a dialectical behavior therapy group, according to a pilot study conducted at the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute in Brookline, Massachusetts.

It was only when she started leading the yoga program that she began practicing yoga herself.

It is hoped that body-oriented approaches such as yoga can assist individuals in being more aware of sensations in their bodies, staying more focused on the present moment and, ultimately, empowering them to take productive actions.” In addition, clinical psychologist Richard Miller, PhD, has designed a nine-week, twice-weekly integrative restoration program based on the ancient practice of yoga Nidra that is quickly becoming one of the most frequently used yoga-based trauma therapies.

  1. The Department of Defense began testing iRest in 2006 with active-duty soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan who were suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
  2. They also reported improvements in interpersonal relationships and a greater sense of control over their life.
  3. Miller has also assisted in the development of comparable programs for veterans, the homeless, those suffering from drug addictions, and persons suffering from chronic pain.
  4. Yoga appears to be beneficial for a variety of different mental conditions, according to new studies.
  5. 20 people who participated in a daily 45-minute sequence of Kundalini yoga methods immediately before night for eight weeks reported substantial decreases in insomnia severity when compared to those who were instructed to follow six behavioral suggestions for good sleep hygiene.
  6. Study participants who practiced Iyengar yoga three times a week for eight weeks reported substantial decreases in depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as increases in mood at the end of each session, according to University of California at Los Angeles psychologist David Shapiro, PhD.
  7. 4, No.

Many of the subjects attained remission and also shown physiological changes, such as increased heart rate variability, that were suggestive of a higher ability to regulate their emotions, according to Shapiro.

In spite of her warning against teaching yoga to clients without formal training, McGonigal and others believe psychiatrists might utilize psychotherapy sessions to practice mind-body awareness and breathing methods learned via yoga practice.

“By themselves, they would be called yoga therapies because they concentrate attention to the breath and assist individuals in unhooking themselves from negative or harmful ideas, feelings, and impulses,” she explains.

“By limiting themselves to conversation therapy, psychologists have painted themselves into a corner,” Gevirtz claims.

In reality, some psychologists believe that yoga may not be all that unique when it comes to increasing one’s mental state, and that a variety of types of exercise may be beneficial in this regard, including walking.

Those who participated in planned exercise (usually walking for 30 to 60 minutes) reported a higher mood at night compared to those who did not participate in planned exercise (generally sitting for 30 to 60 minutes) (Journal of SportExercise Psychology, Vol.

6).

“It appears that many types of exercise, particularly non-competitive exercise, are associated with positive mood alteration,” Berger says.

Vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue are likely to have an impact on one’s ability to function, according to a 2007 study conducted by the APA Board of Professional Affairs Advisory Committee on Colleague Assistance of licensed American Psychological Association members.

“If you can achieve a sense of calm with yourself, it is possible that you may radiate more caring toward your patients.” Amy Novotney works as a writer in the Chicago area.

Yoga and mental health services

Indian Journal of Psychiatry, Volume 57, Number 4, October-December 2015, pages 338–340. Several other papers in PMC have mentioned this article in their own work. Our Indian National Wisdom – “Yoga” – was honored by the United Nations and the international community when the United Nations declared June 21 as “International Day of Yoga.” Yoga literally translates as “union,” which refers to the merging of one’s own consciousness with the collective awareness of the universe. Yoga aids in the transition from “I” to “WE,” or from a restricted person to a universal human being, via meditation.

  1. Yoga is a spiritual lifestyle that is applicable to people of all religious backgrounds.
  2. According to these studies, there is a pressing need to incorporate yoga into mental health treatments.
  3. Different kinds of yoga, such as Sudarashankriya, Sahajyoga, and yogasanas, have been researched for their potential efficacy in the treatment of depression with encouraging findings.
  4. After practicing yoga, patients reported lower depression ratings, according to a variety of studies with differing conclusions.
  5. Yogasana-based therapy alone was not enough to bring depression under control to the point of remission.
  6. Kundalini yoga has been used to treat patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder, and the results have been favorable.
  7. The positive effects of yoga on the negative and cognitive symptoms of bipolar disease are well documented.
See also:  Yoga Toolkit: Natural Ways to Beat Anxiety

Because of these positive findings on yoga in schizophrenia, an international guideline has been developed that recommends the use of yoga in conjunction with medicine in the treatment of schizophrenia.

The practice of yoga has also showed potential in the treatment of caretakers of schizophrenia outpatients, according to one randomized experiment.

The use of yoga in various illnesses such as attention deficit hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD) and autism has been reported in isolated studies.

Yoga appears to have a place in this discussion, according to an assessment.

Following a yoga practice, senior individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have reported increases in sleep, cognitive function, and overall quality of life, according to research.

Would using yoga as part of a comprehensive lifestyle package in the elderly help to postpone the onset of dementia?

There is apparently a correlation between the therapeutic advantages of yoga and alterations in specific biological markers.

This physiological measure is “normalized” to a higher value in depressed individuals following three months of treatment with yoga as the only intervention.

Yoga treatment was found to enhance the levels of a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the blood of depressive individuals who, as a group, had lower levels of the protein.

Both of these biological responses were shown to be associated with yoga’s antidepressant properties.

Yogasana-based treatment was found to enhance the levels of the neurotransmitter oxytocin in schizophrenia patients, as well as improve their social cognition.

A number of observations are pertinent, despite the fact that the particular mechanisms by which yoga mediates these therapeutic and biological benefits are not understood.

Would this make it easier for mirror neurons to function?

Yoga techniques are often characterized by the presence of mind throughout the practice, including when executing asanas.

The practice of mindfulness has been demonstrated to have beneficial benefits on neuroplasticity.

According to magnetic resonance spectroscopy, an acute yogasana practice increases the amount of GABA in the brain’s gray matter.

Could there be yet another method by which yoga exerts its therapeutic effects in the treatment of sadness and anxiety?

In the treatment of depression, vagal stimulation is utilized as an invasive therapy.

This is particularly crucial given the fact that yoga must compete with pharmaceutical treatments in an era characterized by evidence-based medicine.

As a result, double-blind clinical experiments with yoga are extremely difficult to conduct.

Thus, it is necessary to investigate the dose-response relationship between yoga and other forms of exercise.

Another issue that modern physicians are concerned about is the effect of religious beliefs.

Such general practices would also allow yoga experts who have had official training (undergraduate and postgraduate) to include them into their therapeutic sessions.

There is a need to scientifically assess yoga treatment in more multicenter studies and to incorporate yoga into clinical practice, both of which are currently lacking. The addition of a yoga therapist to the mental health team may prove to be a very beneficial addition in the future.

REFERENCES

The transition from sickness to wellness: the case of psychiatric care. 1.Porandla K. AP Journal of Psychological Medicine, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 75–84. 2.H. Cramer, R. Lauche, J. Langhorst, and G. Dobos. A comprehensive study and meta-analysis of the effects of yoga on depression. Journal of Depression and Anxiety, Volume 30, Number 10, pages 1068–83. Three (3).Louie L., “The efficacy of yoga for depression: A critical literature review,” in Psychological Medicine, vol. 2014; 35:265–76. Issues in Ment Health Nursing, 2014.

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A case study of yoga therapy as an unique treatment option for somatoform disorders is presented.

Among those who have contributed to this work are Hariprasad VR, Sivakumar PT, Koparde V, Varambally S, Thirthalli J, Varghese M, and others.

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A look at the multiple faces of oxytocin and its implications for psychiatry.

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Strater C, Whitfield TH, Owen L, Rein T, Karri SK, Yakhkind A et al.

A randomized controlled MRS research compared the effects of yoga and walking on mood, anxiety, and GABA levels in the brain.

in 2010 titled “Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.” A pilot research using functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neurohemodynamic consequences of chanting the word “OM.” International Journal of Yoga.2011; 4:3–6.28.

A neurophysiologic model of Sudarshan Kriya yogic breathing in the treatment of stress, anxiety, and depression is presented in Part I.

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5 Big Ways Yoga Improves Mental Health

1 Psychiatric care: from sickness to wellbeing. Porandla K, et al. (2013) 14:75–84 in Asian Pacific Journal of Psychololgy and Medicine. Dobos, H. Cramer, R. Lauche, J. Langhorst, H. Cramer, R. Lauche, H. Cramer, R. Lauche. A comprehensive study and meta-analysis of the effects of yoga on depression (2013) 30:1068–83. Depress Anxiety. 3.Louie L. The efficacy of yoga for depression: A comprehensive review of the research. 2014; 35:265–76. Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 4.Naga N, Janakiramaiah N, Gangadhar BN, Janakiramaiah Harish MG, Subbakrishna DK and Venkatesha Murthy PJ have published a paper in which they discuss their research.

  • When it comes to melancholia, Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) outperformed electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) and imipramine in a randomized controlled trial, according to the researchers.
  • The authors (Gangadhar BN and colleagues; Naveen GH and colleagues; Rao MG; Thirthalli J and colleagues; Varambally S) thank the authors for their contributions to this article.
  • (2013) 55 (Suppl 3): S369–73.
  • Sixth, Kirkwood et al.
  • (yoga for anxiety: a systematic review of the research evidence) have published a systematic review of the research evidence on yoga for anxiety.
  • British Journal of Sports Medicine The seventh member of the DS team is Shannonhoff-Khalsa.
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227–32 in Indian Journal of Psychiatry, 2012.

Thirthalli J.

2013; 6:141–5.

Twelveth, A.Vedamurthachar, Janakiramaiah, N.

Shetty, Subbakrishna DK, Sureshbabu SV, and colleagues.

2006; 94:249–53.

Author: Arasappa R In this exploratory study, we looked into the feasibility and efficacy of using yoga as an add-on intervention for children with ADHD.

Application of integrated yoga treatment to improve imitation abilities in children with autism spectrum disorder (Radhakrishna S., et al., 2014).

International Journal of Yoga The authors, H.

Lauche (with Haller and Dobos), have published a paper in which they discuss their research findings.

Clinical Journal of Pain BN, Sutar R, Desai G, Varambally S, Sutar R, Desai G, Varambally S, Sutar R, Desai G, Sutar R Study of a patient who received yoga therapy as an unique treatment option for somatoform disorders 2:7–10.17 in Int J Public Ment Health Neurosci, 2015.

A randomized controlled experiment was conducted to determine the effects of yoga intervention on sleep and quality of life in the elderly.

Indian Journal of Psychiatry.

Yoga-based intervention in residents of assisted living facilities: Effects on cognitive function, a randomized clinical trial (2013) 55 (Suppl 3): S357–S363.19 Indian Journal of Psychiatry.

Gangadhar for his assistance.

In a 1997 study, Biol Psychiatry 42:740–3.20 Twenty-first century medicine: Thirthalli J.

Rao MG.

Christopher R.

Twenty-first century medicine: Thirthalli J.

Rao MG.

Yoga has been shown to have cortisol-lowering and antidepressant properties.

Indian Journal of Psychiatry.

A comparative evaluation of the beneficial therapeutic and neurotropic effects of yoga on depression.

Indian Journal of Psychiatry.

“Effect of yoga treatment on plasma oxytocin and facial emotion recognition deficiencies in individuals with schizophrenia.” Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol.

John B.

(Zik) Roberts A look at the multiple faces of oxytocin and its implications for psychiatry Research in Psychiatry 226:31–7.24 (Psychiatry Research).

Mehta, Thirthalli J, Aneelraj D, Jadhav P., Gangadhar BN., and Keshavan M.

A thorough review of mirror neuron failure in schizophrenia and its functional consequences.

Schizophr Res.2014; 160:9–19.25.

Strater C, Whitfield TH, Owen L, Rein T, Karri SK, Yakhkind A et al.

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published a paper by Kalyani BG, Venkatasubramanian G, Arasappa RN, Rao NP, Kalmady SV, Behere RV, et al.

2011; 4:3–6.28.

Brown and Paul L.

A neurophysiologic model of Sudarshan Kriya yogaic breathing in the treatment of stress, anxiety, and depression: Part I.

2005; 11: 189–201. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine The use of yoga as therapy in the treatment of mental diseases has been studied in the past, present, and future (29). (2011) 39:60–3 (Biofeedback).

1. It Keeps You Physically Active

While many individuals do yoga as a spiritual exercise, it is also beneficial to the body on a physical level. The practice of yoga is something you can perform anyplace you have a flat surface on which to lie down, and it requires no equipment other than a yoga mat, which is optional in some situations. In addition to being physically active, any sort of exercise is incredibly useful for improving your mental health since getting up and moving around may help you feel more productive and get some momentum going in your day.

2. It Sets the Stage for Meditation

While many individuals do yoga as a spiritual activity, it is also beneficial to the physical health of those who practice it regularly. The practice of yoga is something you can perform anyplace you have a flat surface on which to lie down, and it requires no equipment other than a mat, which is optional in some situations. In addition to being physically active, any sort of exercise is incredibly useful for improving your mental health since getting up and moving around may help you feel more productive and get some momentum started in your day.

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3. It Can Help Relieve Anxiety

The practice of yoga on a daily basis can be beneficial for reducing anxiety levels. The fact that yoga focuses on movement and breath might assist to divert your attention away from worried or obsessive thoughts is part of the reason behind this. However, studies have shown that it might really have an impact on how your body processes stress and pain, which is a positive development. When your body and brain are better equipped to deal with stress, whether it is physical or mental, you will be less impacted by daily irritations and will be able to remain calm and in control of your life.

4. It May Decrease Depression

Yoga as treatment for depression can be effective in a similar way to how it can be beneficial in treating anxiety symptoms. As you engage in the physical motions of yoga, your brain releases more serotonin, which is a hormone that promotes happiness and well-being. This might assist you in elevating your mood and promoting feelings of tranquility. If you suffer from depression and find it difficult to get out of bed in the morning to tackle your daily activities or errands, yoga might be beneficial since it helps you establish a routine.

As a result, your blood flow is stimulated, and you receive the mental lift of having accomplished something worthwhile, which might last throughout the remainder of the day.

5. It Can Help You Learn How to Stay Calm in Stressful Situations

While there are many different types of yoga, ranging from ashtanga and hatha to iyengar and bikram, they are all centered on the concept of breathing. Overall, the goal is to keep motions as fluid and smooth as possible while moving in sync with one’s breathing. When you do the sun salutation, for example, On the inhale, you stretch your arms over your head, and on the exhale, you fold your arms over your head. When performing more difficult or intensive postures, it is common practice to maintain a position for five breaths while breathing deeply and slowly in and out of it.

It also aids in the development of the ability to keep your thoughts quiet, steady, and focused on the present moment.

If you can stop in the middle of a stressful or overwhelming situation, center yourself, and take a few deep breaths, you will be able to make deliberate judgments about how to behave or what to say rather than reacting from a place of emotion.

Incorporating Yoga as Therapy

If utilizing yoga as a kind of therapy seems like something you’d be interested in, the good news is that it’s really simple to get started. As well as being able to enroll in sessions in person or online, there are several websites that provide information on how to get started with a yoga practice. Begin by considering what you hope to gain from your yoga practice and then selecting a yoga style that corresponds with your objectives. In order to be successful, you must approach this with an open mind and recognize that it may take some trial and error until you find something that works for you.

Choosing a rehab that offers yoga therapy as an option can be a terrific way to get your practice started with in-person teaching and guidance on how to apply the things you learn in the physical practice to your mental health.

Get in touch with us now to learn more about our treatment choices and what it’s like to live at FHE Health.

Additional References:

If utilizing yoga as a kind of therapy seems like something you’d be interested in, the good news is that it’s rather simple to begin practicing. As well as being able to enroll in sessions in person or online, there are several websites that provide information on how to get started with a yoga regimen. Prepare for your yoga practice by considering what you hope to gain from it and then selecting a yoga style that corresponds with that goal. It’s critical to approach this with an open mind and the understanding that it may take some trial and error before you find something that works for your personality.

If you’re presently contemplating treatment options, looking for a rehab that offers yoga therapy as an option can be a terrific way to get your practice started with in-person teaching and guidance on how to take the things you learn in the physical practice and apply them to your mental well-being.

Get in touch with us right away to learn more about our treatment choices and what life is like at FHE Health.

  • The relationship between the mind and the body
  • General well-being
  • Physical discomfort
  • Sadness
  • Worry
  • Stress

While both traditional yoga and yoga therapy have the potential to be extremely calming and therapeutic, there are some significant distinctions between the two practices. It all boils down to individual results, ultimately. A traditional yoga instructor will train students in the methods and practices of yoga as they are taught by their teachers. These classes are often intended for a broad range of students. In yoga therapy, on the other hand, the therapist will pay close attention to your specific emotional and physical requirements.

A yoga therapist will analyze your needs prior to a session in order to provide you with the best possible experience. They’ll also go through a variety of therapeutic techniques, including:

  • Yoga postures, guided energy work, meditation methods, breath awareness and control are some of the approaches used.

Sadie Grossman, a licensed yoga therapist, explains that the therapist will choose the appropriate combination of these techniques depending on your specific requirements. A yoga therapist will also provide you with tips on how to practice yoga on your own time and on your own terms. According to Grossman, “I’m a big believer in patients leaving a session with a real intervention that they can apply on their own, therefore empowering them.”

Stress reduction

Speaked certified yoga therapist Sadie Grossman, the therapist will choose the appropriate combination of these techniques for you. You will also receive guidance on how to conduct your own yoga sessions from a yoga therapist as well. According to Grossman, “I’m a strong believer in patients leaving a session with a practical intervention that they can apply on their own, which helps them feel empowered.”

Anxiety relief

Yoga has proven to be effective in reducing anxiety in many people. There’s an excellent explanation for this! The relaxing feelings, concentrated breathing, and gentle movements can all contribute to a reduction in anxiety symptoms. 34 women who were sent to a yoga clinic for anxiety were given the opportunity to practice yoga twice a week for two months, whereas a control group of 31 women did not practice yoga. Following the yoga session, the yoga group saw higher reductions in anxiety levels than the control group.

Improved eating habits

The practices of meditation and yoga both help to promote awareness, and some evidence shows that mindfulness might help people adopt healthier eating habits and live a more fulfilling life. This is why yoga is frequently used in the treatment of eating disorders: it may help you develop a more positive relationship with food and your body. Bonus: Mindful eating can also aid in the regulation of blood sugar levels as well as the maintenance of a healthy weight range.

Better mood

It’s quite OK to be having a bad day. It does happen. Yoga therapy, on the other hand, can assist you in preventing negative emotions from taking hold. It can assist you in slaying those endorphins and leaving you feeling a helluvalot better after doing so. According to a 2017 study, specific yoga positions might help people feel more energetic and confident. A full-fledged yoga treatment session? That’s even better. Depression has the ability to make anybody feel cut off and alone. But keep in mind that you are not alone.

  1. Yoga, according to some research, may be beneficial for your health.
  2. Depression may have a significant impact on your energy levels as well as your ability to focus.
  3. Yoga can also be beneficial on a chemical level, since it has been shown to lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which has been associated to depressive symptoms.
  4. Yes!
  5. But keep in mind that it is not a panacea for all ailments.
  6. PSA: Yoga therapy may be most effective when used in conjunction with other types of treatment.

Yoga therapy may have a significant positive impact on both your mental and physical wellbeing. Here’s a detailed look at all of the advantages and disadvantages to help you determine if it’s appropriate for you.

Pros:

  • It’s quite OK to have a bad day on the job or at school. Every now and again, something like this occurs. Yoga therapy, on the other hand, can assist you in preventing negative emotions from taking hold of you. Endorphins are released when you exercise, and you will feel a whole lot better as a result. According to a 2017 research, specific yoga positions might help people feel more energetic and confident in their own skin and body. A full-fledged yoga therapy session? Yes, please. And that’s not all: Individuals suffering from depression may feel cut off and alone. Don’t forget, though, that you’re not by yourself. Depressive disorders impact around 17.3 million individuals in the United States annually. Yoga, according to certain research, may be beneficial in improving your health. To do so, follow these steps: Depression may have a significant impact on your energy levels as well as your ability to focus. The practice of yoga may provide you with the extra push you’re looking for to go back to work. Additionally, yoga has been shown to be beneficial on a chemical level, since it has been shown to lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which has been associated to depression. When it comes to depression, Grossman recommends attending group sessions since the social environment might make you feel less alone in your struggles. Yes! When it comes to treatment, yoga can be beneficial. However, keep in mind that it is not a panacea for all ailments and diseases. However, while yoga therapy may not be able to completely replace the effects of other therapies (such as medicine or psychotherapy), it is certainly worth a try! PSA: Yoga therapy may be most effective when used in conjunction with other types of therapy. Yoga therapy may have a significant positive impact on both your mental and physical wellness. Here’s a detailed look at all of the advantages and disadvantages to help you determine if it’s the correct choice for your situation.

Cons:

  • Not for everyone
  • It may be difficult on a physical and emotional level
  • It can be expensive (although this varies depending on the studio or therapist)
  • And it is not for everyone.

Yoga: Fight stress and find serenity

Is yoga the correct choice for you? It is if you want to combat stress, get active, and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Staff at the Mayo Clinic The phone on your person is ringing. Your manager has requested to speak with you. In addition, your companion is curious about what you’re having for supper. Stress and anxiety are prevalent throughout society. In the event that they’re getting the better of you, you could want to hop on your yoga mat and give it a shot. The mind-body practice of yoga combines physical postures, regulated breathing, and meditation or relaxation to create a holistic experience.

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And it’s something that practically everyone can do.

Understanding yoga

Among the various forms of alternative and integrative medical techniques, yoga is believed to be one of the most effective. Yoga is a combination of physical and mental disciplines that can assist you in achieving a state of calmness in both your body and mind. This might assist you in relaxing and managing your stress and anxiety levels. Yoga comes in a variety of styles, forms, and intensities. Hatha yoga, in particular, may be a suitable alternative for stress management because of its flexibility and strength.

However, the majority of people may benefit from any form of yoga – it all depends on your own tastes.

  • Poses. Yoga poses, also known as postures, are a series of exercises that are intended to improve strength and flexibility in the practitioner. Pose difficulty ranges from easy to challenging. In a straightforward post, you could find yourself lying on the floor, utterly calm. You may find yourself pushing your physical boundaries while holding a challenging position
  • Breathing. Yoga requires you to be in control of your breathing at all times. Yoga teaches that regulating your breathing may assist you in managing your body and quieting your thoughts
  • Meditation or relaxation are other terms for controlling your breathing. You may add meditation or relaxation into your yoga practice. Meditation may assist you in becoming more conscious and aware of the current moment without passing judgment on yourself or others.

The health benefits of yoga

Yoga has the potential to provide the following health benefits:

  • Stress reduction is important. Yoga has been found in a number of studies to be effective in the reduction of stress and anxiety. Yoga has been shown to improve your mood as well as your general sense of well-being. Yoga may also be beneficial in managing the symptoms of sadness and anxiety that may arise as a result of challenging circumstances.
  • Fitness has been improved. Yoga practice may result in better balance, flexibility, range of motion, and strength
  • However, this is not guaranteed. Chronic illnesses are managed in a variety of ways. Yoga can aid in the reduction of risk factors for chronic diseases such as heart disease and high blood pressure, amongst other ailments. Yoga may also be beneficial in the management of low back pain, neck discomfort, and symptoms of menopause. Yoga may also be beneficial in the treatment of a variety of chronic diseases, including pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, arthritis, and sleeplessness, among others.

Yoga precautions

When done under the supervision of a qualified instructor, yoga is usually believed to be safe for the majority of healthy individuals. Yoga, on the other hand, might be dangerous in some instances. In the event that you have any of the following symptoms, see your doctor before beginning yoga:

  • Herniated disk
  • Increased risk of blood clots
  • And more. Conditions of the eyes, such as glaucoma
  • While yoga is typically safe during pregnancy, there are several positions that should be avoided
  • For example, Balance issues that are severe
  • Osteoporosis that is severe
  • Blood pressure that is out of control

In certain instances, you may be able to practice yoga provided you take precautions, such as refraining from performing particular postures or stretches. If you have any symptoms, such as discomfort, or have any concerns, see your doctor to ensure that yoga is providing you with benefits rather than damage.

Getting started

Despite the fact that you may learn yoga from books and videos, most beginners find it more beneficial to study with an instructor. Classes also provide opportunities for companionship and friendship, both of which are beneficial to one’s general well-being. When you locate a class that looks intriguing, speak with the teacher to have a better understanding of what to anticipate in the session. The following are examples of questions to ask:

  • Is it possible to find out what qualifications the teacher has? Where did he or she get training, and how long has he or she been in the teaching profession? Is the teacher familiar with working with students who have special needs or health issues like yours? What if you have a painful knee or an aching shoulder? Can the teacher assist you in finding positions that will not exacerbate your condition? What is the level of difficulty in the class? Is it appropriate for those who are just starting out? Whether or not it will be simple enough to follow along if it is your first time When it comes to the class, what can you expect? It is oriented at those who wish to reap additional advantages, rather than those who require stress management or relaxation
  • Is it geared toward people who need stress management or relaxation

Achieving the right balance

Every individual has a unique physique with a unique set of capabilities. Yoga poses may need to be modified based on your specific capabilities and limitations. Perhaps your instructor will be able to offer modifications to your positions. It is essential to choose a yoga instructor who is knowledgeable and who knows your needs if you want to practice yoga safely and efficiently. If you practice yoga, regardless of the style, you are not required to perform every posture.

If a posture is painful or you are unable to hold it for the duration of time requested by the instructor, do not perform it. Instructors that are good at what they do will recognize and encourage you to explore — but not go beyond — your own boundaries.

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  1. What you need to know about yoga. Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health). AskMayoExpert. Yoga. Mayo Clinic
  2. 2019
  3. Accessed on December 10, 2020
  4. AskMayoExpert. Selectively and with the use of a yoga program The American College of Sports Medicine is a professional organization dedicated to the advancement of sports medicine. 10th of December, 2020
  5. When choosing an alternative health practitioner, there are six factors to consider. Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health). Goldman L, et al., eds., accessed on December 10, 2020. Complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine are all terms that are used to refer to different types of medicine. 2020. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine, 26th edition, Elsevier Publishing. Yoga for health was last accessed on December 10, 2020. (eBook). Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health). On the 10th of December, 2020, accessed

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Yoga as a Part of Counseling? The Benefits of Yoga for Your Mental Health

Yoga as a component of counseling services? Yoga Has Several Health Benefits for Your Mental Health

Yoga as a Part of Counseling? Benefits for PTSD, Anxiety, and Depression

Yoga is well-known for a variety of benefits, including stress reduction, improved flexibility and attention, and the promotion of a sense of serenity, to mention a few. But did you know that it may also be used to treat emotional trauma? Lingering emotional trauma can emerge as symptoms such as despair, anxiety, hostility, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The fact that trauma is stored in our bodies (through the autonomic nervous system, or ANS), it is critical to discover a method of releasing it.

In addition, I frequently advocate yoga because it may aid in the release of trapped emotions and energy that has been held in the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which is where your body accumulates trauma.

When you have a well-functioning system, you are more relaxed and less stressed.

Yoga can also be beneficial if you are experiencing continuous environmental stress, such as work stress or family stress.

How do we know yoga helps?

Many people who practice yoga are aware that it is effective because of the way they feel afterward. Yoga, on the other hand, has been shown to have several health advantages in scientific studies. For example, studies have discovered that both yoga and meditation can assist to enhance heart rate variability in healthy individuals (HRV). What is the significance of HRV? Increasing your heart rate variability (HRV) is beneficial since it measures the distance between one heart beat and the next.

When you are calm or engaged in deep breathing, there is greater space between each pulse, resulting in an increase in your heart rate variability (HRV).

It is significant because when you have a well-balanced and well-regulated autonomic nervous system, you have greater control over how you react to little disappointments or pressures in our daily lives, which is vital.

People with poorly controlled autonomic nerve systems are more susceptible to being thrown off balance on both a mental and physical level than others.

Furthermore, reduced HRV has been shown to be associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as well as with anxiety. In order to alleviate the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or anxiety, it is necessary to enhance your heart rate variability (HRV).

But what if I am not a “yoga” person?

Many of my customers are scared by yoga because they believe they must be ultra-flexible or as rigid as a pretzel in order to do it. This isn’t the case at all! There are many different styles of yoga that may be tailored to your degree of comfort. Which sort of class should you enroll in and why? Despite the fact that there are many different styles of yoga (for example, vinyasa, hot, yin, yang, hatha, bikram, etc.), all of them include a mix of pranayama (breath techniques) and asana (postures) (postures).

  • You can select the best kind for you by experimenting with different options.
  • Some people may experience more peaceful sleep or some other advantage as a result of their efforts, which may encourage them to continue.
  • Exercise and yoga, whether as a stand-alone treatment or in conjunction with EMDR, counseling, or CBT, can help you feel better about yourself.
  • We all experience mental health symptoms at some point in our lives, whether they are emotions of worry, sadness, or general stress.
  • Yoga may be a wonderful complement to counseling and therapy since it will help you feel better throughout the process.
  • Yoga for the Treatment of Emotional Trauma Van derKolk is a fictional character created by the author of the novel Van derKolk (2014).

Want to learn more techniques on how to reduce emotional trauma? Contact Dr. Hutchinson today »

The Honorable Tracy Hutchinson, M.D. 2019-01-25T17:42:27+00:00

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