How Phillip Esteban Shifted His Business to Feed Those in Need

One Chef’s Pandemic Pivot: Feeding Those in Need

A randomized controlled trial conducted on patients with life-threatening cancer found rapid and sustained symptom reduction following psilocybin treatment for anxiety and depression. S. Ross et al., “Rapid and sustained symptom reduction following psilocybin treatment for anxiety and depression in patients with life-threatening cancer,” Journal of Psychopharmacol., vol. 30, no. 12, pp. 1165–1180, 2016; S. Ross et al., “Acute and sustained reductions in loss of meaning and suicidal ideation following psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy for psychiatric and existential distress in life-threatening cancer,” ACS Pharmacol.

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One meal at a time

When Esteban and his colleagues realized they had access to a commercial kitchen, they rolled up their sleeves and got to work. In the end, they went with an idea that the chef had been thinking about commercializing for a long time: Filipinosilogbowls, a classic morning dish of fried rice, frequently with grilled veggies, on top of which an egg is cooked. Silog is comfortable at any time of day and is simple to travel, according to Esteban, so they prepared the bowls in large quantities, adding gourmet touches such as sous-vide eggs and smoked salmon.

  • Due to the complications of delivery, Esteban and business partner chef Marcus Twilegar requested the help of friends to drive the goods to their destination.
  • The next month, he made contact with Tim Kilcoyne, the head of chef operations at World Central Kitchen, a worldwide organization founded by chef José Andrés, a Nobel Peace Prize contender.
  • After 40,000 meals had been provided by the end of summer 2020, Esteban and the Craft Meals team increased their total to more than 100,000 by January 2021.
  • A trial initiative to assist San Diego’s fishing sector was launched because restaurant closures had also harmed the ecosystems on which farmers and food purveyors rely.

Fisheries to Families has cooked 15,000 meals and used 10,000 pounds of fish to feed local families and laid-off industry workers in the first six months of operation, and they have received enough financing from the San Diego Foundation to continue operations until the end of 2021.

Food for the soul

As soon as they gained access to a professional kitchen, Esteban and his colleagues rolled up their sleeves and started preparing meals. In the end, they went with an idea that the chef had been thinking about commercializing for a long time: Filipinosilogbowls, a typical morning dish of fried rice, frequently with grilled veggies, on top of which an egg was poached. Esteban explains that because silog is soothing at any time of day and is portable, they prepared the bowls in large quantities and added gourmet touches such as sous-vide eggs.

  1. When faced with the challenges of delivery, Esteban and business partner chef Marcus Twilegar recruited the help of friends and family to drive the goods.
  2. At the beginning of April, he made contact with Tim Kilcoyne, the head of chef operations at World Central Kitchen, a worldwide nonprofit organization founded by chef and Nobel Peace Prize contender José Andrés.
  3. After 40,000 meals had been provided by the end of summer 2020, Esteban and the Craft Meals team increased their efforts to more than 100,000 by January 2021.
  4. A trial initiative to assist San Diego’s fishing sector was launched because restaurant closures had also harmed the ecosystems that farmers and food purveyors relied on.
  5. Fisheries to Families has cooked 15,000 meals and used 10,000 pounds of fish to feed local families and laid-off industry workers in the first six months of operation, and they have received enough financing from the San Diego Foundation to continue operations through the end of 2021.

How Chef Phillip Esteban Adapted and Expanded His Businesses During a Pandemic

Thank you for joining us for another half hour of happiness! Chef Phillip Esteban, a National City native who has worked at David Chang’s Momofuku Ssäm Bar in New York City and, most recently, as the research and development chef for Consortium Holdings, joined us this week. Our initial plans were for Phillip to appear on the podcast back in March to talk about his forthcoming culinary ventures in National City, which were highlighted in the April issue’sNeighborhood Guide. However, things fell through.

  1. What we can expect when the shop opens this autumn and how the restaurant is taking form in preparation for a 2021 launch are some of the topics he discusses.
  2. Phillip and I had a wonderful talk about the redevelopment efforts in National City, his experiences as a Filipino American in San Diego, and how Filipino food is still underrepresented in the region and throughout the United States.
  3. Besides the rice bowls (if you prefer pork, try the lechon), Phillip has partnered up with World Central Kitchen to assist distribute meals to health-care professionals across the country.
  4. Rice Bowls for All is a website where you may browse the menu and place orders.
  5. First and foremost, we discuss the need of bars closing their doors once more.
  6. In addition, we discuss Encinitas’ decision to close a piece of its main roadway downtown to allow for additional outdoor eating options.
  7. The boozy popsicles and cioppino atSmall Bar come highly recommended by David, while Troy raves about the empanadas atEmpanada Kitchen and I prefer the brisket atCoop’s West Texas BBQ.
  8. Thank you so much for taking the time to listen and for sticking with us.
  9. Is there a particular person you’d like us to bring on the show?
  10. Do you need a suggestion for a takeaway restaurant?
  11. Please let us know.

Note from the editors: We recorded this episode on Tuesday, June 30, just before Governor Newsom ordered the suspension of in-room eating in 19 counties around California.

How Chef Phillip Esteban is Delivering Meals with Sustainability in Mind

Greetings and welcome back to the Happy Half Hour! Our guest this week is Chef Phillip Esteban, a National City native who has worked at David Chang’s Momofuku Ssäm Bar in New York City and, most recently, as the research and development chef for Consortium Holdings, among other places. Phillip was originally scheduled to appear on the show back in March to discuss his forthcoming culinary initiatives in National City, which were highlighted in the April issue’s Neighborhood Guide. As soon as the program was back up and running, we spoke with him on the progress of his future Filipino restaurant and culinary bookshop, Well Fed, which will be located in the new Market on 8th development in downtown National City.

  • A Chopped episode is scheduled for Tuesday, July 7, and we will have to check in to see what he has in store for us!
  • His catering company Craft Meals grew in the wake of the March shutdown, and he explains how he channeled his energies into expanding it to produce Filipino silog (rice bowls) for take-out and delivery.
  • During the month of March, he and his crew collected and distributed 40,000 meals.
  • In this episode, we bring back the Hot Plates feature, in which we analyze the most recent restaurant news from across the region.

Afterwards, we examine eateries that have established or grown as a result of the pandemic: A new brewery and restaurant, Puesto, is set to open in Mission Valley; Michelin-starred chef Akira Back has openedLumi, a big rooftop restaurant in the Gaslamp Quarter; and La Puerta, a renowned Mexican restaurant in downtown, is planning a second site in Mission Hills.

  1. After that, we have our revamped Takeout for Two section to round out the episode!
  2. In addition to coffee from Provecho, Phillip recommended three other restaurants, all of which are tiny enterprises that have just started and are now providing delivery: Tijuana-style burritos fromLongplay Studio and Mexican seafood fromMariscos Tone Camarón.
  3. Let us know what you think.
  4. Possibly a subject that should be investigated further.
  5. What question do you want to put forward to Troy today?

Alternatively, you may phone us at 619-744-0535 and leave a voicemail, or, if you’re feeling bashful, you can send us an email at [email protected] We recorded this episode on Tuesday, June 30, just before Governor Gavin Newsom announced the suspension of in-room eating services for 19 counties around California.

Meet Chef Phillip Esteban

Esteban is a career culinary expert who has worked at a variety of establishments including Eleven Madison Park, Per Se, and Momofuku Ssäm Bar, among others. However, during the majority of his professional life, he did not prepare Filipino food. For many Filipino-American cooks, this is not an unusual occurrence. If you compare Filipino food and restaurants to other Southeast Asian cuisines such as Thai or Vietnamese, Filipino restaurants and cuisine are underrepresented in the American culinary landscape.

  • For many, being “too Filipino” carries with it a social stigma and a sense of unease in their own skin.
  • This is a story that Esteban is familiar with.
  • Cooking, music, and painting were all pastimes, not long-term professions.
  • Many Filipino-Americans and minorities who want to pursue a career in such fields face additional challenges as a result of a lack of role models and avenues to success.

OpenGym is Giving Back with Meals

A dinner delivered to a hospital by Esteban (on the right). They have contributed more than 100,000 meals to communities in need as a result of a cooperation with José Andrés’ World Central Kitchen (WCK), which he founded. In addition to Craft Meals, Chef Esteban owns and operates White Rice, a Filipino breakfast and rice bowl business that aims to introduce and educate clients about Filipino food. Filipino breakfast is dominated by meat, with dishes such as sweet longanisa sausage served with savory garlic rice, both of which are topped with a fried egg.

  1. Esteban is really passionate about promoting Filipino tastes, and this is one of the reasons why he started the restaurant.
  2. Why shouldn’t Filipino cuisine have a place at the table among other cuisines such as Korean and Thai cuisines?
  3. “There’s an element of thrill in just trying something new,” Esteban explained.
  4. “This is a step toward closing that gap.” Esteban’s work is motivated by a desire to strike a balance between community, Filipino culture, and environmental sustainability.
  5. It has always been a stopover employment for many people in the food sector, a transitory post before they embarked on another professional path.
  6. It is the nature of the work that has altered for certain restaurant employees, such as Esteban, in recent years.
  7. In Esteban’s instance, his culinary endeavors have raised questions about the existing quo.
  8. every day since the outbreak began speaks much about their commitment to achieving a more sustainable work-life balance.
  9. “There’s a concept we learn in school called bayanihan, which literally translates as ‘community spirit,'” explained Esteban.
  10. It was simply a case of being Filipino.”
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How You Can Support

Food from Craft Meals Catering or White Rice may be ordered if you are in the San Diego region. You can also purchase sweatshirts from the OpenGym x Mikkeller Super Cozy line. Now is the time to shop. As part of our Brands Giving Back Series, we’ll bring you the latest information on companies that are giving back to the community, as well as information on how you can support them by purchasing online.

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National City Native, ‘Chopped’ Chef Gives 100 Free Meals to South San Diego Families

Texas Wine and the Hill Country: A Guide to the Region; The NFT Restaurant, owned by Gary Vaynerchuk, will open in New York City in 2019. In this episode of Broken Bread, chef Roy Choi talks about the new season. In 2022, the following are the five most significant food trends to watch. In March, TikTok ‘Ghost Kitchens,’ which will serve viral foods, will open.

The Scene

Continue reading more stories from The Scene San Diego. Esteban, in collaboration with the San Diego Fisherman’s Working Group, operates a program called Fish to Families to help feed the hungry. You can find out more about his work with that initiative by listening to ourScene in San Diego podcast, which you can find below or here. You may listen to or subscribe to the Scene in San Diego podcast to stay up to date on the newest local lifestyle stories as well as news from our local food and beverage scene.

We’ll keep you informed about how those changes will affect the activities you like doing in our community in the coming months.

Filipino Chef Phillip Esteban Wants to Dramatically Change Kitchen Culture

Chef Phillip Esteban had never truly prepared Filipino food for anybody other than his immediate family before the year 2019. That this is the case may come as a surprise given that all of his new businesses are celebrations of his Fil-Am heritage. There’s White Rice, a fast-casual restaurant in San Diego where bowls of crispy pig belly (also known as lechon kawali) are served amid heaps of purple ubepandesal (a kind of rice). Next month, he’ll host a pop-up with DC Filipino concept, Pogiboy, where he’ll serve ube brioche burgers and other treats.

  • Despite this, he spent the most of his career preparing different types of cuisine.
  • You start working at other restaurants and you’re simply putting the skills that you’ve learned to any cuisine you want, whether it’s modern American, Japanese, Korean, or whatever you want,” he explains.
  • Who am I as a Filipino-American who has worked as a chef for 18 years now?
  • “There is no one who wants to leave San Diego.
  • As opposed to continuing to make the same burgers and garlic aiolis every day, he went on a cooking tour up and down the West Coast until settling in New York in 2010.
  • “Expecting to go always represented a chance to go study and gain perspective from new cultures and different experiences.” “I brought those memories back with me, such as the hustle and bustle of New York City and the drive,” he adds.
  • Instead of considering back-of-house personnel as disposable, Esteban decided to take it upon himself to teach and educate these individuals.

“It was necessary to burst that bubble.

According to him, “a young cook working double shifts from 8 a.m.

at night only to pay rent does not have a high quality of life.” I began to consider the reasons for why individuals make the decisions that they do, such as why there is a high rate of drunkenness, drug addiction, and sexism.

Along with his commitment to empower kitchen staff, Esteban is now completely immersed in his Filipino-American identity, which he embraces wholeheartedly.

According to him, “I tailor the recipes to the Filipino palate since Filipinos adore sweet foods,” but he aspires to make them more available to people of other generations and socio-economic backgrounds as well.

His true north star, though, is kababayan, which is Tagalog for “countrymen” (countrymen).

“Even if the translation is a fellow countryman or townmate, it”s about respect for community and cultural unity—helping each other flourish,” he says with a grin on his face. “I’m just being myself, being Filipino, being bayanihan,” I say. “I’m not trying to be someone else.”

“What’s Missing is Middle Ground Filipino Food” (A Q&A with a Culinary R&D Chef in San Diego)

chef phillip esteban’s website (Image courtesy of Kim Marcelo.) Phillip Esteban works as a Research and Development Chef with CH Projects, a firm that aspires to build more than simply restaurants and bars, but “incubators for meaningful encounters” through their work. In San Diego, the firm is working on 12 projects (which they prefer not to refer to as restaurants and bars). For this article, we drew on Phillip’s culinary experience (which included a kitchen stint at David Chang’s famed Momofuku Ssäm Bar) as well as his research and development background to learn more about the Filipino cuisine scene in America’s Finest City.

  1. More information regarding your Filipino ancestry will be appreciated by MFB.
  2. My father enlisted in the United States Navy and assisted in the immigration of our entire family to the United States.
  3. PE: I was born in the California city of San Diego.
  4. Because of the linguistic barrier, my grandpa encountered bigotry when he first arrived in our country.
  5. As a result, we were unable to become fluent in Tagalog or Ilocano throughout our stay.
  6. One of my first recollections as a youngster was of spending time with my grandma, who taught me how to cook and bake.
  7. PE: My first work in a professional kitchen was as a prep cook at The Firefly Restaurant at the Dana Hotel in Mission Bay, where I met my wife.

CH Projects’ Research & Development Chef, MFB: Please inform us about your responsibilities at the company.

In addition to working with our chefs on menu creation and inventiveness, I am also involved in the development of our business culture, the training of our new cooks, and the leadership of our rising management teams.

Photo courtesy of San Diego.org PE: The Filipino culinary scene in San Diego is crowded with “point point” establishments, as the saying goes.

To be quite honest, my main fear is that the Filipino culture is likewise deeply based in the pursuit of bargains and discounts.

In contrast, either Filipino food is presented in a very plain manner or it is served at a high level of fine dining.

The wonderful thing about San Diego is that there are many Filipino Chefs who are doing exceptionally well in the community and who are working hard to promote and improve our cuisine in the United States.

The perfect Filipino dish, in your opinion, is.

My favorite cuisine is kare-kare, a classic Filipino delicacy of braised oxtail stew with peanut butter sauce, which is a personal favorite of mine.

Qui Restaurant (by Chef Paul Qui, a Filipino and Top Chef winner) in Austin, Texas, (formerly Kuneho) had a well-executed tasting menu that was influenced by Filipino cuisine and was favorably received.

Bridging the gap between people through food and storytelling Like us on Facebook/Follow us on Twitter for more information.

Phillip Esteban

Originally from National City, Phillip Esteban is an award-winning chef who has toured the world in order to perfect his culinary art form. After coming home, he has focused his efforts and attention on providing locations for the community to get together and share meals that are bold, real, and easily accessible. Phillip Esteban’s professional career began after he graduated with honors from the Arts Institute of San Diego with a degree in Culinary Arts. Soon after, he assisted in the opening of The Guild, where he began working as a sous chef in his first post.

  • In order to further his culinary education, he relocated to New York City and began working at the Momofuku Ssäm Bar, where he has been since 2011.
  • Phillip returned to Southern California with both the culinary and operational knowledge he had garnered during his time in the Philippines.
  • When Phillip was given the opportunity to assist with the debut of The Cork and Craft, it was the perfect opportunity to convey his vision of not just a creative place, but also a caring and educational one.
  • He has finally taken the plunge and opened Well Fed, a contemporary take on Filipino cuisine with a focus on his hometown of National City as its cornerstone.
  • The establishment of WellFed has resulted in the expansion of programs such as Open Gym, Craft Meals, Wordsmith, White Rice, and Wildflour in San Diego.
  • He has supplied more than 250,000 meals throughout the counties of San Diego as a result of his efforts.
  • The overarching goal of the development and extension, in collaboration with the creative team Open Gym, is to effect good change via the establishment of venues to serve underserved populations that are empowering, uplifting, and encouraging of empathy and understanding.

At the intersection of craft and culture, chef Phillip Esteban finds home

Originally from National City, Phillip Esteban is a multi-award-winning chef who has toured the world to perfect his culinary skills. After coming home, he has focused his efforts and attention on establishing locations for the community to get together and share meals that are bold, real, and affordable. Obtaining a degree in Culinary Arts from the Arts Institute of San Diego was the starting point of Phillip Esteban’s professional life. His first sous chef role came shortly after, when he assisted in the opening of The Guild.

  • In order to further his culinary education, he relocated to New York City and began working at the Momofuku Ssäm Bar, where he has been since 2009.
  • Phillip returned to Southern California with a wealth of culinary and business knowledge garnered during his time abroad.
  • Phillip saw the opportunity to assist with the debut of The Cork and Craft as an excellent opportunity to share his vision of not just a creative place, but also a caring and educational atmosphere with the community at large.
  • He has finally taken the plunge and opened Well Fed, a modern take on Filipino cuisine with a focus on his hometown of National City as its home base.
  • Since the inception of WellFed, programs such as Open Gym, Craft Meals, Wordsmith, White Rice and Wildflour have seen a surge in popularity around the city.
  • He has supplied more than 250,000 meals throughout the counties of San Diego as a result of these initiatives.

It is the goal of the overall growth and extension, in collaboration with the creative team Open Gym, to effect good change via the establishment of venues to serve underserved populations that are empowering, uplifting, and empathic in nature.

Finding himself

The middle child of seven children, born at Balboa Hospital to a Navy father and a nursing mother — “your conventional Filipino family,” Esteban remarked, laughing. “I grew up in the middle of the family.” He realized early on that cooking and food would play a significant part in his future life. “I grew up in a food-centric environment,” said Esteban, who grew up in National City and Paradise Hills, districts peppered with mom-and-pop Filipino bakeries and point-and-shovel restaurants (the English translation of the Tagalog phrase for fast-food eateries known asturo-turo).

  • “I have photographs of my grandma and myself in the kitchen, preparing food.
  • My mother grew tired of my asking her for it on a daily basis, so she gave me the recipe and showed me how to make it.” Having spent years working in San Diego, Los Angeles, and New York, Esteban is now beginning on a series of new initiatives at the age of 39, following years of experience.
  • As a member of a new generation of Filipino chefs, he has no qualms about putting Filipino cuisine where they believe it belongs: on mainstream restaurant menus.
  • And with a specific goal in mind.
  • Not only does he want to see Filipino food served on restaurant tables, but he also wants to see Filipinos working in the kitchen.
  • There was no one who was brown, and there was no one who had a flat nose.” It is estimated that there are only a handful of Filipino cooks working in San Diego kitchens, with even fewer serving as executive chefs.
  • “There were no resources that suggested I could do this for a job” while he was attending Morse High School, he recalls.
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As a result, I never imagined myself being able to make a livelihood from cooking.” The tattoos on Chef Phillip Esteban’s fingertips serve as a constant reminder to “hold tight and keep the course” when the going gets tough.

Cepeda of the San Diego Union-Tribune) After starting at San Diego Mesa College with the intention of going to the University of California San Diego, he left out in 2003 to pursue a culinary degree at the insistence of a roommate.

In any case, it was an adventure he was looking forward to beginning.

After returning to San Diego, he worked for a while at Jason Knibb’s Nine-Ten in La Jolla before establishing his own restaurant, The Cork and Craft.

Even in the midst of a pandemic, he was chosen chef of the year by San Diego Magazine in 2020.

After all of that time, Esteban couldn’t seem to get rid of a nagging sense that kept bringing him back to his own country.

“And that void in the market is filled by my own culture — things that I was raised with and were familiar with.” Not to disparage any of the other Filipino chefs or their work, he continued, “but what they’re doing and what they’re doing is really incredible.” Particularly today, in the midst of all the talks about equality and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, “I believe there is a great opportunity” to place Filipino culture front and center, according to the author.

Esteban’s next major project is Well Fed, an elevated-dining Filipino restaurant he plans to launch in 2022 under the aegis of Open Gym, a hospitality and leisure firm he founded with partners in 2019.

With Well Fed, Esteban is abandoning the usual San Diego eating establishments in favor of his hometown of National City, where he grew up.

Once it opens, Well Fed is planned to serve as a focal point for revitalization efforts in National City, which will include a public market called Market on 8th, where Esteban hopes to establish a second Weapon Ramen, a gourmet shop and bookshop called Wordsmith, and a second Weapon Ramen location.

No matter how many plaudits I receive or how good the cuisine I prepare, I believe that the most important thing is that I am now able to provide the item I lacked for the next generation,” she says.

Having recently opened two restaurants in Liberty Station, chef Phillip Esteban is now concentrating his efforts and energy in National City, where his family is from. (Photo courtesy of Nelvin C. Cepeda of the San Diego Union-Tribune)

Perfect time

Initially, conversations with Esteban may revolve around food, but they ultimately devolve into something much larger than food, something far larger than him and his life. Given his background and current position, he believes there is “a broader purpose of developing a pipeline for the future generation of chefs that look like us, that look like me.” He hopes that this ethos, which exists at the nexus of craft and business, as well as culture, continues to develop. He believes that being a chef carries with it a certain amount of duty, which is heightened even further when one is a chef of color.

When I was growing up, it was critical for all newcomers to learn English first, thereby blotting out our own culture.” Then he went on to say, “All of this trauma (comes from) what our parents taught us because they wanted us to live a normal life and become Americans.” In a way, we lose our sense of ourselves.” “As I talk to more and more Filipinos, I realize that they share my desire to discover their own identity and to discover where they come from.” Esteban views the process as a personal one.

“We’re taking this thorough dive into everything,” Esteban explained before opening White Rice and as he prepares to launch Well Fed.

He provides Filipinos and Filipino-Americans with a physical flavor of home through the rice bowl idea.

As he explained, “We’ve been so accustomed to assimilating into American society that even for me — who cannot speak or understand Tagalog — this is an exploration of my own identity, a genuine exploration of my own identity via cuisine.” Moreover, Well Fed is “that enormous hope” for filling the gap in fine dining options for Filipino food in National City: “There is no good dining in National City.” That is to say that, if you’re going anywhere, you’ll probably end up at Villa Manila, Zarlitos, Erlinda’s, or Tita’s.

Turo-turo is something you obtain from your local mom-and-pop stores. However, if you’re seeking to take your family out to experience Filipino cuisine and culture in a manner that you haven’t before, you won’t find it here. “I believe that we are in the midst of that ideal period.”

Honoring his heritage

According to Esteban, who studied culinary arts at the Art Institute of San Diego in Mission Valley, “you’re taught to write (profit-and-loss statements) and business plans.” He’s written numerous business plans that have outlined “eight concepts that have stuck,” including early versions of White Rice and Well Fed. In school, he learned about the importance of being able to cook and grasp different culinary concepts. As he put it: “Today’s world demands that you speak eloquently, have a distinct personality, and be able to deal with the strain of being on television.

“I graduated from culinary school with a $72,000 debt.

“How do you pay for culinary school while working at a minimal wage?” “Having worked in this sector for 18 years, I’ve witnessed things that happen on a regular basis in our profession – poor pay, long hours, mental health issues, suicide, and alcoholism, for example.” “There are a plethora of diverse options.” Esteban believes that this does not have to be the case, and he is committed to becoming a part of the solution.

As a result, under the auspices of Open Gym, Esteban and his partners are placing a strong emphasis on “the value of family and mental health,” according to Esteban.

Throughout the city, he is utilizing his voice by participating on boards of directors, including the Filipino advisory group to National City Mayor Alejandra Sotelo-Solis.

“We’re dabbling in spaces outside of food that can create true positive change and impact within San Diego — within our backyards, communities, and neighborhoods,” said Esteban, who champions causes such as AAPI representation and food insecurity and serves on the board of the nonprofit (ARTS).

“I’ve had the pleasure of knowing him for more than a decade and can state without hesitation that he is a ‘complete package’ culinarian in every way.

It’s just one of the numerous ways Phil distinguishes himself.

“Himself and his tribe — his family and friends — are at the center of his work, and this is my favorite aspect of how he does it.

As a foundation, Phil’s pride in his cultural history, as well as his desire to share the flavors of his ancestors with others via the use of excellent ingredients and creative cooking techniques, serve to create delectably strong outcomes.”

What It Takes For Filipino Food To Finally Have A Seat At The Table

Currently, Chef Philip Esteban is working with friends to bring Filipino food to the forefront of San Diego’s culinary scene. He is also the founder of Open Gym, a nonprofit that offers meals, community programming, and services to neglected neighborhoods. The board of directors for A Reason to Survive, a nonprofit creative initiative that provides an outlet for poor youngsters, is comprised of Esteban, who also serves on the mayor of National City’s Filipino Advisory Board. One idea he is actively striving to advance is the establishment of a Filipino Cultural Center in his birthplace of National City, often known as San Diego’s Filipino Town, where tourists can learn about and enjoy Filipino cuisine culture.

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A culinary shop and bookshop called Wordsmith will open in the near future.

On how the pandemic motivated him into taking action

Food sector was severely devastated by the epidemic, not just from the perspective of the chefs in restaurants, but from the standpoint of the whole ecosystem — from drivers to enterprises and products, to produce, and even the fishermen and women. As a result, Open Gym became a requirement. We formed a partnership with fishermen and then utilized our catering company, Craft Meals, to seek for grants and raise funds to help feed families in need in the local community. Because we’re friends from various sectors who were attempting to find out how we could develop systems and places within the community that would assist elevate marginalized groups and increase the visibility of people of color, we named it “Open Gym” to signify our collective effort.

  1. The vast bulk of our financing comes from generous individuals and grant writers.
  2. So I contacted my attorney and inquired as to whether Open Gym, as a non-profit organization, would be able to write grants and then contract with restaurants to provide the meals.
  3. My culinary experience spans around 18 years, during which I’ve worked in three Michelin-starred restaurants.
  4. As the epidemic began to spread, we considered how we may be able to use our catering company to assist first responders and supply food.

Because I am Filipino, I was aware that half of the nurses in the field were also Filipino, making it simple to prepare silog rice bowls as a meal alternative. Every meal that was purchased resulted in a meal being donated to the local community.

On helping to combat food insecurity

While growing up in National Community, a tiny city west of San Diego with around 60,000 residents, I discovered that social fairness and opportunity are not as widespread as they are in more affluent locations. There are many individuals who lost their employment as a result of the epidemic in National City, and this is where a lot of the food insecurity occurs, as well as in other nearby communities. It was already happening there before to the pandemic, but people just became hyper-aware of it as a result of the epidemic.

  1. And it is one of the goals of Open Gym as well as the Fish to Families meal distribution program, which we established in 2010.
  2. Because of all of the community work we were doing at Open Gym, the San Diego Fishermen’s Working Group came out and stated that there is a protein shortfall in underprivileged populations, particularly among the food insecure, and that we should consider providing protein supplements.
  3. After that, we formed a distribution partnership with 12 other NGOs in San Diego to provide home and door deliveries as well as walk-ins.
  4. There are never any questions asked – if you’re hungry, we’ll provide you with a meal.
  5. We also brought in contributions of food goods, toys, and other items to assist them in getting through this difficult time.
  6. Since the beginning of the epidemic in March, they had not received a single meal, a single package of vegetables, or any other sort of aid from the local, state, or federal governments.
  7. As a result, we completed our one-for-one program and preserved all of the meals, after which we gave 700 meals to the inhabitants.

On having great mentors and serving as a role model to the next generation

I’ve been cooking for nearly 18 years and have experience working in three Michelin-starred restaurants, hotels, privately owned restaurants, and catering establishments. I’ve also been all around the world and across the United States. And the bad aspect is that when I first started cooking, there was no one else in the field who looked like me to emulate. I had incredible mentors, but I didn’t have any mentors who were Filipino, and I didn’t know any Filipino cooks when I started out. In the workplace and at home, I would always prepare Filipino food for my family and friends, but I would never serve it in a restaurant setting.

  1. However, you must now be familiar with social media, television, and writing.
  2. Then I thought about what it is that I’m putting into the food business, my local community, and the next generation of cooks and chefs that look like me.
  3. I believe that a lot of it has to do with the way that we see our own culture and the way that we portray it on the inside.
  4. The problem is that you now have to grasp social media, television, how to write, and a slew of other things.
  5. I believe it has been a long time in the making.
  6. Being able to receive notes from culinary mentors over the years in which they express delight in the work that I am doing is quite rewarding.
  7. After that, he says something like, “Hey Chef Phil.
  8. It has everything to do with it.

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In order to avoid the possibility of the eggs rolling around and shattering, you need invest in this set-up, which allows you to nestle 18 eggs in the machine at the same time.

Get it for $7.99 from Amazon., credit: Amazon, width:1462, height:1361, ops:, title: An egg steamer rack, width:1462, height:1361, ops:, width:1462, height:1361, ops:, title: An egg steamer rack, cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null, width:1490, height:1500, credit: Amazon, type: picture, caption: Have you ever had the patience to wait until your Instant Pot’s inner pot was totally cool before pulling it out?

No, we didn’t think so either.

A pair of mini silicone mittens for $9.99 may be purchased from Amazon., credit: Amazon, width:1490, height:1500, ops:, title: Mini silicone mitts to assist you in grabbing the hot inner pot, cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null, width:1640, height:924, credit: Amazon, type: image, common:, caption: Metal utensils can scrape the coating off your Instant Pot.

Some of our personal favorites are as follows: For $17.40, you can get a lid cleaning brush.

Find a spoon spatula on Amazon for $7.20., credit: Amazon, width:1640, height:924, ops:, title: Tools that won’t ding up the inside of your Instant Pot, type: image, meta:null, summary:null, badge:null, cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null It is available in three different sizes, is dishwasher safe, and is free of PTFE and PFOA.

(Please continue reading for a storage lid, because you will require one!) Buy a 3 quart Instant Pot for $19.99, nbsp; $22.99, or $32.99 for a 6 quart or $8 quart on Amazon., credit: Amazon, width:1385, height:1252, ops:, title: And a stainless steel inner pot, type: image, meta:null, summary:null, badge:null, cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null As a result, you may transfer your cooled pot directly to the refrigerator, where it will be easier to store.

Get it for $13.06 at Amazon, credit: Amazon, width:1485, height:1331, ops:, title: A silicone cover for convenient storage This cheesecake is legendary among HuffPost colleagues, and she swears that this pan is one of the secrets to its greatness., type: image, meta:null, summary:null, badge:null, cta, width:1500, height:992, credit: Amazon, type: image, common:, caption: A HuffPost colleague is legendary among cheesecake, and she swears that this pan is one of the secrets to its greatness.

Particularly well-suited to the IP is Fat Daddio’s 7×3-inch pan with a detachable bottom (don’t bother with any other brand or model).

It is available for $12.59 on Amazon., credit: Amazon, width:1500, height:992, ops:, title: The perfect pan for making IP cheesecake, type: image, meta:null, summary:null, badge:null, cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null Simply place it on top of your Instant Pot and allow it to do its magic!

nbsp; Obtain it for $62.95., credit: Amazon, width:1498, height:1500, ops:, title: An air fryer attachment that saves you a significant amount of counterspace , cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null, width:1500, height:1089, credit: Amazon Because most individuals don’t have containers to cook the yogurt in, most people never utilize the yogurt-making feature of their Instant Pot.

You can purchase the set from Amazon for $9.99., credit: Amazon, width:1500, height:1089, ops:, title: Yogurt cups!, type: image, meta:null, summary:null, badge:null, cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null, width:1500, height:921, credit: Amazon, type: image, common:, caption: There’s nothing more frustrating than trying to You can simply take your meal from this silicone version without dropping it or scorching yourself.

This version is compatible with both the 6-quart and the 8-quart cookers, respectively.

Your soup will be buttery smooth in minutes once you wave its magic wand around the interior of your pot.

It’s available on Amazon for $25.99., credit: Amazon, width:1137, height:1198, ops:, title: A hand blender for all you soup-making enthusiasts, type: image, meta:null, summary:null, badge:null, cta:, textWrap: noWrap, provider:null, width:1499, height:1500, credit: Amazon, type: image, common:, caption: Egg bites are popular However, if you have an Instant Pot, you can make them even more quickly and easily than you would otherwise.

Cleanup will be a breeze, and getting ready in the mornings will be a breeze.

You can get it for $14.44 on Amazon.

cough, cough, cough, cough, cough, cough, cough For $66.32 (for the 3 quart size), $89 (for the best-selling size), or $99 (for the larger capacity), you can get the Instant Pot Duo from Amazon (8 quart).

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Accessories You Need For Your Instant Pot

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