How Yoga Helped My Mental Health

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  • What Is Substance Abuse Treatment and How Does It Work? A Booklet for Children and Their Families This program was developed for family members of those who suffer from alcoholism or drug addiction difficulties. Questions regarding substance abuse, including its symptoms, different forms of therapy, and rehabilitation are addressed in this section. This publication addresses the issues of children whose parents have drug misuse or addiction disorders. Addiction to alcohol and drugs may occur in even the most loving of families. This book describes how alcohol and drug addiction have an impact on the entire family. He describes the process of drug and alcohol addiction therapy, how family interventions may be a first step toward recovery, and how to assist children in homes afflicted by alcoholism and drug misuse. It’s Not Your Fault (National Association of Colleges and Employers) (PDF | 12 KB) Assures kids who have parents who misuse alcohol or drugs that “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone in their struggles with substance addiction. A resource list is provided, which encourages kids to seek emotional assistance from other adults, school counselors, and youth support organizations such as Alateen, among other places. It Hurts So Much: It Doesn’t Have to Be This Way The organization provides information on alcohol and drug addiction to youngsters whose parents or friends’ parents may be struggling with substance misuse issues. The author encourages young people to look out for one another by talking about their problems and joining support organizations such as Alateen. When There Has Been an Attempt: A Guide to Taking Care of a Family Member Once you have received treatment in the emergency department, Aids family members in dealing with the aftermath of a relative’s suicide attempt by providing information and resources. Provides an overview of the emergency department treatment procedure, a list of questions to ask regarding follow-up care, and information on how to limit risk and maintain safety while at home. Family therapy can be beneficial for people who are recovering from mental illness or substance abuse. This course examines the function of family therapy in the treatment of mental illness and substance misuse. A family therapy session is described in detail, along with the people that conduct them. It also includes information on the usefulness of family therapy in the rehabilitation process. Please visit the SAMHSA Store for further resources.

How Yoga Helped My Mental Health

Why Do People Seek Help for Substance Abuse? A Family-Friendly Guidebook This program was developed for family members of those who struggle with alcoholism or drug addiction. Questions regarding substance abuse, including its symptoms, different forms of therapy, and rehabilitation are addressed in this article. Provides answers to the questions and concerns of children whose parents have drug misuse or addiction issues. Even in the most loving of families, alcohol and drug addiction may develop.

He describes the process of drug and alcohol addiction therapy, how family interventions may be a first step toward recovery, and how to assist children in families afflicted by alcoholism or drug addiction.

  1. 12 KB) It’s not your fault (NACoA) Assures kids who have parents who abuse alcohol or drugs that “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone in their struggles with alcohol and drugs.
  2. Although it feels terrible, it is not necessary.
  3. The author encourages young people to look out for one another by conversing about their problems and joining support organizations such as Alateen.
  4. The procedure of receiving emergency department care is described, as are the questions to ask concerning follow-up therapy, as well as how to limit risk and maintain safety at home.
  5. The function of family therapy in the rehabilitation from mental illness or substance misuse is explored in this book.
  6. It also includes information on how effective family therapy is in helping people heal from their problems.
  • What is Substance Abuse Treatment and How Does It Work? A Booklet for Children and Their Parents This program was developed for family members of those who suffer from alcoholism or substance misuse disorders. Questions concerning substance misuse, including its symptoms, different methods of therapy, and recovery, are answered. This publication addresses the concerns of children whose parents have substance misuse or dependence issues. Addiction to alcohol and drugs may strike even the most loving of families. The effects of alcohol and drug addiction on the entire family are discussed. He describes the process of drug and alcohol addiction therapy, how family interventions may be a first step toward recovery, and how to assist children in families afflicted by alcoholism and drug addiction. It’s Not Your Fault (NACoA) (PDF | 12 KB) It’s Not Your Fault Assures kids who have parents who abuse alcohol or drugs that “It’s not your fault!” and that they are not alone in their struggles with alcohol or drugs. A resource list is provided, which encourages kids to seek emotional assistance from other adults, school counselors, and youth support organizations, such as Alateen. It Hurts So Much: It Doesn’t Have To Be Like This Provides information on alcohol and drug addiction to youngsters whose parents or friends’ parents may be struggling with substance misuse issues. The author advises young people to look out for one another by discussing about their problems and joining support organizations such as Alateen. After a Suicide Attempt: A Guide to Taking Care of Your Loved One Following treatment in the emergency department Specifically designed to assist family members in dealing with the aftermath of a relative’s suicide attempt. The author covers the emergency department treatment procedure, provides a list of questions to ask concerning follow-up care, and discusses ways to limit risk and maintain safety at home. People in recovery from mental illness or addiction might benefit from family therapy. This course examines the role of family therapy in the recovery from mental illness or substance dependence. A family therapy session is described in detail, along with the people that conduct them. It also includes information on how beneficial family therapy is in the rehabilitation process. Additional resources can be found in the SAMHSA Store.

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Join Yoga Journal*Outside subscriptions are invoiced once a year on a monthly basis. Print subscriptions are only accessible to citizens of the United States. Your subscription may be terminated at any time, but no refunds will be granted for any payments that have already been made. Following cancellation, you will continue to have access to your membership until the end of the paid-for year. Bipolar disorder was diagnosed when I was 17, in my senior year of high school.

  1. I was continuously plagued by a sense of impending dread and apprehension about the unknown.
  2. After that, I was in and out of the hospital for the next many years, alternating between medicine and no medication.
  3. I began doing yoga while I was pregnant.
  4. When I was done, I felt like a completely different person, both physically and psychologically.
  5. After I had my daughter, my yoga practice had fallen by the wayside, and I had to return to drugs.
  6. The class began with 20 minutes of yoga and 5 minutes of meditation, and then progressed from that point.
  7. When I meditated, I noticed that I was less impulsive and reactive.

I had reached a point in my mental health journey where seeing healers helped me accept where I was at that time.

After she stated to me that it was my job to debunk the myths around depression and anxiety so that others may be empowered, I realized I had to tell my experience.

It was also important to me to reveal my bipolar diagnosis with the entire group of thirty other participants, which was something I’d never done before.

As I delivered my narrative, fireworks erupted outside the studio windows, illuminating our sleepy mountain village.

A total of 1,500 hours of yoga teacher training were completed between 2008 and 2019.

Today, I am able to recognize when I need to get on my mat in order to shift energy and release worry.

And it gives me a sense of security, like if everything is going to be OK and everything is well with the world.— According to Julie Kiddoo, author of Bye-Polar, who spoke with Caitlin Carlson.

This article is a part of Yoga Journal’s Special Report: “Yoga in the City.” In What Ways Can Yoga Benefit Your Mental Health? More information may be found at:

  • Subscriptions to Yoga Journal are invoiced on a yearly basis. Only residents of the United States can purchase print subscriptions. Your subscription may be terminated at any time, but no refunds will be given for any payments that have already been made. Your subscription will be active until the end of the paid-for year after your cancellation. For more information, please see the following link: When I was diagnosed with bipolar illness, I was 17 years old and in my senior year of high school. I was continuously plagued by a sense of impending dread and apprehension about what was ahead for me. I couldn’t sleep well because I couldn’t keep my appetite under control. My medicines and hospitalizations were in and out of my life for the following many years. Because I wanted to become pregnant, I decided to discontinue my medication in 2002 after consulting with my doctor about it. My yoga practice began throughout my pregnancy. The pregnant yoga videos by Shiva Rea were on repeat four days a week, so I would roll out my mat four times per week and practice. My physical and emotional state was completely transformed by the time I ended. Depression crept back into my life over time. After giving baby, my yoga practice was put on hold, and I was forced to return to medicine. A buddy persuaded me to enroll in a local “40 Days to Personal Revolution” program, which I found to be effective. Starting with 20 minutes of yoga and 5 minutes of meditation, the class gradually increased in length. I noticed a difference in my sleep quality during the first week. My meditation practice helped me become less reactive. Eventually, in 2010, I made the decision to stop visiting a psychiatrist and instead speak with a clairvoyant. In my mental health journey, I had reached a point where seeing healers was beneficial in helping me accept where I was. If I was not feeling any unpleasant side effects from my meds, she assisted me in accepting that it was okay to continue taking them. After she stated to me that it was my job to debunk the myths around depression and anxiety so that others may be empowered, I realized I had to tell my experience. The very following day, I began a new “40 Days” program with a different group of people. Another reason for sharing my bipolar diagnosis with the entire group of 30 people was something I’d never done before. The race in my heart was accelerating, but I knew it was necessary to complete this task in order to be free. The town of our small mountain town was lighted up by fireworks as I delivered my narrative outside the studio windows. It was like receiving a spiritual pat on the back for having the courage to speak out about my experiences. A total of 1,500 hours of yoga teacher training was completed between 2008 and 2019. I also started my first yoga studio, which was in 2012, when I was 23 years old. Today, I am able to recognize when I need to be on my mat in order to shift energy and rid myself of stress. Body, mind, and soul are all connected via yoga. Moreover, it instills a sense of security in me, as if everything is going to be OK and all is well with the world. Julie Kiddoo, author of Bye-Polar, shared her story with Caitlin Carlson. This article is a part of Yoga Journal’s Special Report: “Yoga for the Rest of Your Life,” which is available online. What Yoga Can Do for Your Mental Well-Being For further information, please see this link:

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5 Ways Yoga Can Benefit Your Mental Health

Why Yoga may be as as effective as medication in some cases Images courtesy of Pexels A few of the many possible benefits of yoga include: stress reduction; increased flexibility and attention; and generating a sense of calm and tranquillity, to mention a few of the benefits of yoga. In addition to its physical advantages, however, experts are beginning to get a better understanding of yoga’s therapeutic benefits for those suffering from mental health issues. In fact, some evidence suggests that yoga can be an effective “prescription” for a wide range of the most frequent reasons why individuals seek psychotherapy, including anxiety and depression.

  • As a strategy to promoting mental health and well-being, yoga is no longer regarded simply “holistic”; in recent years, it has developed a scientific following and has a large body of research to back up its claims.
  • Yoga has also been demonstrated to reduce verbal hostility in people who practice it regularly.
  • Yoga was found to reduce anxiety among teenage musicians when they performed in groups and solos, according to a 2013 research.
  • 3.
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms: According to a study conducted in 2014 on adult women diagnosed with PTSD, yoga was found to significantly lessen PTSD symptoms in women who underwent a 10-week yoga therapy compared to women who received a control group of no yoga treatment.
  • In addition, studies have indicated that yoga can assist to lessen depression as well as enhance mood and lower perceived stress levels.

For example, in a research conducted with a jail population in 2013, a 10-week yoga program was found to boost positive affect while simultaneously decreasing perceived psychological stress. Yoga Is Beneficial for Your Heart Images courtesy of Pexels

Why Does Yoga Work? Yoga Helps the Heart

Because they feel good after doing yoga, many people who practice it believe it has a positive effect on their health. However, scientific evidence supports the physiological benefits of yoga, which may assist to explain why it is beneficial for mental health difficulties and emotion management. In particular, yoga’s capacity to enhance heart rate variability (HRV) is at the root of this phenomenon. Increased heart rate variability (HRV) relaxes the autonomic nerve system, which is where the body accumulates trauma.

  • What is the significance of HRV?
  • Aiming for higher HRV has been demonstrated to be beneficial in terms of calming your autonomic nervous system and regulating your emotions.
  • In some cases, your heart may be pounding rapidly and your breathing is shallow.
  • When you are calm or engaged in deep breathing, there is greater space between each pulse, resulting in an increase in your heart rate variability (HRV).
  • Anxiety, stress, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and rage are all associated with decreased heart rate variability.
  • People with poorly controlled autonomic nerve systems are more susceptible to being thrown off balance on both a mental and physical level than others.
  • By engaging in activities that enhance your heart rate variability (HRV), such as yoga, you may help retrain your heart and physiology, which can result in improved emotion regulation and a more relaxed state.
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Fortunately, there is no need for a formal prescription!

Some people prefer the more physically active kinds of yoga (yang), such as vinyasa or bikram.

In any case, no matter the style of yoga you do, the multiple physical and psychological advantages it provides can make it a valuable element of your healing process.

References Afonso, R.

H., Oliveira, D.

Leite, J.

Afonso, R.

H., Oliveira, D.

(2012).

Menopause, volume 19, pages 186–193.

R., Raghuram, N.

R., Raghuram, N.

A randomized control experiment was conducted to determine the impact of yoga on verbal aggression in healthy volunteers who were otherwise normal.

76–82 in the International Journal of Yoga.

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Khalsa, B.

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KHLSA, S.

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B., Dalpiaz, N.

G., Sperb, W., Hertzberg, J., and Olivera, A.

Menezes, C.

R., Kiesow, L.

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Review of key psychological effects and their physiological correlates in the context of yoga and emotion control.

Psychology and Neuroscience, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 82-101. . van der Kolk, B. A. van der Kolk, B. A. (2014). The score is kept by the body: The role of the brain, the psyche, and the body in the healing of trauma. Viking Publishing Company, New York, New York, United States

Can yoga help improve my mental health?

Forms of yoga have long been recognized as valuable partners in the quest to manage the mind and cope with stress. Science has demonstrated that it may be used to treat depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among other conditions (ADHD). The effectiveness of mind-body techniques as treatments is difficult to assess because clinical trials cannot be conducted in a blinded fashion. However, single-blinded trials, open-label studies, and studies of comparative responses to mass trauma provide a substantial scientific basis for advocating yoga as a complementary and alternative medicine treatment.

  • When these symptoms are present, it is recommended that you exercise extra caution.
  • Before beginning a yoga program, people with chronic medical issues and those who are pregnant should consult with their doctor.
  • A well-trained yoga instructor may be a tremendous asset in assisting students to get the most out of their yoga practice.
  • Yoga can be beneficial to both persons who suffer from mental health disorders and those who do not have them.

Benefits of Yoga for Mental Health

Yoga has long been recognized as an ally in the process of managing one’s mind and dealing with stress in its various forms. Several studies have shown that it is beneficial in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia as well as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (ADHD). Mind-body techniques are difficult to evaluate as treatments because it is not possible to conduct clinical trials with double-blinding. However, single-blind trials, open-label studies, and studies of comparative responses to mass trauma provide a substantial scientific basis for recommending yoga as a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) intervention.

Individuals who exhibit these symptoms should exercise extra vigilance.

Prior to beginning a yoga program, those with chronic medical issues and women who are pregnant should consult with their doctors.

In order for people to obtain the most benefit from yoga, they need to be guided by a qualified yoga instructor. Everyone can benefit from exercises such as stretching, breathing, and relaxing. Individuals suffering from mental illnesses, as well as those who are not, can benefit from yoga practice.

Psychological Benefits of Yoga

Yoga has long been recognized as an ally in the process of conquering the mind and managing with stress. Science has demonstrated that it can be beneficial in the treatment of depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among other conditions (ADHD). Mind-body techniques are difficult to evaluate as treatments because it is not possible to conduct double-blind clinical trials; however, single-blind trials, open-label studies, and studies of comparative responses to mass trauma provide a substantial scientific basis for recommending yoga as a complementary and alternative medicine treatment.

  1. When these symptoms are present, it is recommended that you proceed with caution.
  2. Before beginning a yoga program, those with chronic medical issues and women who are pregnant should consult with their doctors.
  3. A well-trained yoga instructor may be a tremendous asset in ensuring that students get the most out of their yoga practice.
  4. Yoga can be beneficial to both persons who suffer from mental illnesses and those who do not.

How to Use Yoga to Improve Your Mental Health

The most effective approach to learn yoga is to work with a certified instructor, either in a private session or as part of a group class. A yoga instructor may help you correct your postures and show you how to adjust them if required, according to your needs. Some stances can be made simpler by using props like as blocks, belts, and other such materials. Yoga can also be practiced on a chair rather than on the floor if desired. Yoga may also be learned via a book or a DVD, or it can be done online.

Once you’ve mastered the fundamentals, you may use books and videos to assist you in your practice.

If you feel comfortable practicing yoga at home, you can do it whenever you are experiencing increased stress, insomnia, or other difficulties in your life.

Risks of a Yoga Practice

Yoga is a low-risk practice, although it can result in injuries, the most common of which being sprains and strains. Injuries can occur as a result of poor technique, pre-existing problems, or simply trying too hard. Some injuries may be attributed to teachers who have received insufficient training. The possibility of harm does not deter most yoga practitioners from participating in their practice. Fewer than 1 percent of people who have been injured while doing yoga have given up the practice.

If you are experiencing injuries while exercising, you should consult with your doctor about your fitness routine. Additionally, yoga practice should never be used as a substitute for medical attention.

How Can Yoga Help My Mental Health?

Skip to the main content A person’s mental health may be improved via the participation in two vital activities: exercise and meditation, which are both advised. What if there was a way to combine them in a practice that allowed you to practice meditation and deep breathing while also building strength, endurance, and flexibility all at the same time? Yoga is a simple remedy that is already available: it is a form of meditation.

Yoga for mental health

Yoga, which derives from the Sanskrit word yog, which means union, seeks to restore and/or deepen the connection between the mind, body, and spirit via a variety of practices. In a regular yoga practice, you move from one posture to the next while being directed by the inhales and exhales of the breath throughout the session. Breathing with intention may assist in deepening a stretch, maintaining balance, transitioning out of or into a pose, and relaxing all of the muscles after a particularly tough hold of position.

Yoga, in reality, offers a slew of advantages for one’s mental health.

Following psychological benefits such as calming the mind, attuning people to their surroundings, improving concentration and mental clarity, reducing stress and anxiety, encouraging positive thoughts and self-acceptance, and promoting flexibility, there are spiritual benefits such as awakening the spirit, developing healthy spiritual awareness, promoting interdependence between mind, body, and spirit, enhancing the concept of oneness of all things, and enhancing the concept of oneness of all beings.

Reducing stress and anxiety

Yoga raises the amount of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, a natural chemical that is produced to promote feelings of peace and wellness, hence lowering stress and anxiety levels in the body. Yoga, because of its reliance on breathing methods, contributes to an even greater sensation of tranquility. Taking deep breaths is one of the most effective methods of relaxing the mind, and it’s often the first thing people say when attempting to help someone through a period of panic or high anxiety.

When you take a deep breath, you boost the flow of oxygen to your brain, which enhances feelings of clarity and minimizes the impact of stress on your brain and body.

Enhance sleep

Getting adequate sleep is not only vital for taking care of your physical body (a lack of sleep may significantly impair one’s immune system’s ability to operate properly), but it is also essential for maintaining one’s mental well-being. Practicing yoga can help you sleep better at night by improving the quality of your sleep, making it easier to fall asleep, and helping you return to sleep if you wake up during the night. An actual nationwide survey found that 55% of yoga practitioners reported improved sleep quality after incorporating the practice into their daily routine.

Enhance concentration and mental clarity

Meditation is an essential part of yoga, since it has the benefit of mixing both yoga and meditation. This includes improved attention as well as mental clarity and clarity of thought. In order to successfully complete a balancing posture or proceed through a standing position, you must maintain an awareness of the connection between the body and the breath. It is sometimes necessary to maintain higher focus in order to avoid falling over. A meditation practice that complements this mental centering on the present moment is mindfulness meditation.

Their presence has no effect on you; they are simply present for the sake of being there.

Relieve pain

As an important component of yoga, meditation provides advantages that are similar to those provided by the practice of yoga and meditation. This includes improved attention as well as mental clarity and clarity of thought and speech. During a balancing posture or when moving through a standing position, you must maintain your attention on the interconnectedness of your body and breath. Increased focus is often required simply to keep from falling over. A meditation practice that complements this mental centering on the present moment is mindfulness meditation.

Because they happen to be present, their presence has no effect on you in any manner.

In different styles of yoga, this is included more consciously, but it is also incorporated more broadly throughout each practice, such as while maintaining a challenging posture while allowing your breathing to lead you and support you through it despite your difficulties.

Yoga as a supplement to mental health treatment

In many treatment clinics, yoga is being used to treat mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, and even drug use disorder since it is a comprehensive, non-invasive, and restorative exercise. Make an appointment with Tapestry now at 828-490-4032 to begin your treatment journey with holistic choices such as yoga. Adult Programs | AshevilleTapestry Adult Programs | BrevardTapestry Adult Programs | FletcherTapestry Adolescent Program | Fletcher a link to the page’s load

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The Benefits of Yoga: How It Boosts Your Mental Health

Yoga is being used in many treatment institutions as a holistic, non-invasive, and restorative exercise for mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and even drug use disorder. Contact Tapestry now at 828-490-4032 to begin your treatment journey with holistic choices such as yoga. In addition to the Tapestry Adolescent Program in Fletcher, there are Tapestry Adult Programs in Asheville and Brevard. a link to the page load

Yoga’s physical benefits to the brain and body

Yoga has been demonstrated to reduce stress hormones in our body while simultaneously enhancing good brain chemicals such as endorphins and GABA. Yoga is a low-impact type of exercise (gamma-aminobutyric acid). These feel-good molecules aid in the reduction of anxiety and the improvement of mood. As a result, Dr. Keenmon believes that yoga’s benefits will help to reduce the natural aging process since there will be less shrinkage in the parts of the brain that process information and store memories as a result of regular practice.

According to Dr.

The parasympathetic nervous system is activated during yoga, which helps to reduce the fight, flight, or freeze response.

Even the inflexible can practice yoga

The practice of yoga, as a low-impact exercise, has been demonstrated to reduce stress hormone levels in our bodies while concurrently raising good brain chemicals such as endorphins and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid). In addition to reducing anxiety and improving mood, these feel-good molecules have other benefits. Since a result, Dr. Keenmon believes that yoga’s benefits will help to reduce the natural aging process, as there will be less shrinkage in the parts of the brain that process information and store memories as a result of the practice over time.

A 45-minute yoga session was compared to a sedentary method of relaxation such as listening to music or reading, in which the researchers examined brain imaging and chemical data between the two groups.

Keenmon, persons who practice yoga have higher quantities of beneficial brain chemicals.

The parasympathetic nerve system is activated during yoga, which helps to reduce the fight, flight, or freeze response. Yoga can also help to reduce negative emotions such as melancholy, worry, and rage, according to her.

How to start yoga and ways to continue

COVID-19 carried with it nearly two years of greater isolation and social alienation, which continued after the outbreak ended. It became more difficult, if not impossible, to book in-person yoga sessions. Yoga, on the other hand, develops synergy even when practiced electronically, with friends, strangers, or under the guidance of a single instructor. Dr. Keenmon’s favorite YouTube yoga channel, “Yoga With Adriene,” has videos for people of all fitness levels. Beginners, seasoned yoga enthusiasts, and athletes of all levels may all find something to their liking in a brief session.

  1. People seeking for something a little more high-energy and involved should check out the subscription app Obé Fitness (Obefitness.com), which offers several different styles of yoga courses.
  2. Starting a yoga practice is the beginning of a journey toward betterment.
  3. The simple act of exercising for 10 minutes a day can help enhance mood, lessen anxiety, and reduce emotional reactivity – something that everyone going through COVID, round 4, can certainly appreciate.
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Yoga For Mental Health

Regular visitors to my website are aware that I publish an advice piece titled “Ask Dr. Dombeck” on a regular basis. What I hear over and over again is “How can I best manage my (condition)?” This is a common question I get asked. Because I strive to provide ethical advice, and because there are significant limitations to the information available in the online question and answer format, I typically recommend that the writer consult with his or her doctor to obtain an accurate diagnosis of the problem, and then follow the doctor’s treatment recommendations.

  • There is just no alternative for developing a personal relationship with one’s own physician, psychologist, or psychotherapist on a one-on-one basis.
  • I like to advocate things that have been shown to be generally beneficial in boosting mental health and peace of mind, such as socializing, physical activity, and relaxation.
  • Yoga?
  • Yoga is something that almost everyone has heard of, but not everyone is fully aware of what it entails.
  • During the second century BC, it was institutionalized in the form of the Yoga Sutras, which are credited to the philosopher Pantanjali.
  • Yoga might be compared to a type of prayer that serves a similar function, except that prayer is often vocal, whereas Yoga is more likely to incorporate physical movement.
  • One of the things that has successfully made its way to America is a highly developed disciplined system of physical exercise that provides numerous advantages to people who practice it (physical, social, psychological, and’spiritual’ benefits).

Yoga has been secularized, and while this is undoubtedly considered an abomination by many yogis in India, it has made a set of potent practices for actual self-improvement available to the general public that would otherwise be inaccessible through religious means.

When it comes to Hatha Yoga, it is primarily focused with the study of specific physical postures that are often called after the ways in which animals and buildings move.

For example, although very basic practice may concentrate on learning specific poses, more experienced students learn to link diverse postures together so that they flow seamlessly into one another and, as a result, enhance one another’s abilities.

Yoga is naturally non-competitive due to its nature.

There are no Yoga belts to be earned in this game.

Each posture or stance is intended to assist the individual practicing them in improving their physical strength, their physiological flexibility and range of motion, and their overall balance to a varying degree.

Those same characteristics assist us in being more physically healthier, concentrating better, relaxing more fully, and gaining more control over our emotions in the United States of America.

When I propose Yoga as a fantastic practice to engage in in order to maintain one’s health, I’m referring to the mental advantages of the practice rather than the physical ones, though both are present and beneficial as well. Yoga, in my opinion, has the following advantages:

  • Practicing yoga has been shown to have health benefits similar to that of physical exercise. Moderate exercise has long been recognized by psychologists as beneficial for treating depression and anxiety. Yoga practice is a great place to find this type of training. Exercises such as yoga poses are intended to increase physical strength, flexibility, and balance. The cardio/heart advantages of yoga are well documented, and your heart rate is typically elevated when executing poses, just as it would be if you were participating in a more traditional type of exercise. Despite the fact that yoga raises your heart rate and gets your endorphins running, it also includes several relaxation moments. These rest times impart a soft character to the conditioning that makes it easier to sustain than a’marathon’ form of exercise would otherwise be possible. It is rare that you feel as if you are unable to continue. Practicing Yoga, which emphasizes moderate stretching of the joints and spine, helps to enhance range of motion and improve joint health. Muscle kinks and small difficulties that may otherwise result in back discomfort or stiffness can be worked out with this technique. Yoga, in addition to promoting joint and spinal flexibility, appears to promote a sense of mental freedom
  • There is a distinct sense of mental ease and comfort that you experience at the end of a Yoga class that appears to be linked to being free to move muscles that were tight before the class started. It doesn’t always stay for long, but when it does, it is quite genuine and extremely calming to be around. Yoga practice, like any physical activity, requires you to focus your attention on the physical sensations you are experiencing as well as the correctness of the postures you are performing. Yoga’s immersed concentration component might be a beneficial tonic for persons who suffer from anxiety and obsessional tendencies. Yoga (or virtually any other physically demanding activity) may be an excellent distraction from stress because it causes the mind to pay attention to the body and the breathing
  • The present moment
  • Yoga Promotes Relaxation and Emotional Control Yoga promotes relaxation and emotional control Despite the fact that mental health professionals tend to stress language and verbal expression (as well as the blunt hammer of Valium) as the most effective means of dealing with emotional difficulties, body-based therapy interventions also have a place in the treatment of emotional disorders. After all, the fight or flight reflex – the physical preparation of the body to protect or escape – is the starting point of the’stress reaction’ that so many anxious and depressed individuals experience begins with the fight or flight response. In the body, chronic stress manifests itself as persistent muscular tension and stiffness, and this very stiffness and tension appears to be responsible for part of the anxiety and discomfort that anxious and stressed-out people experience as a result of their stress. In terms of stress reduction and relaxation, yoga is a very useful therapy. Muscle groups and joints must be tensed and stretched before being relaxed in order to perform various postures, which successfully generates relaxation in a similar fashion to that produced by massage or Progressive Muscle Relaxation (a technique employed by behavioral psychologists). Yoga practice also brings the practitioner’s attention to his or her breathing, which results in a peaceful and relaxing state of mind. Exercise and yoga for stress reduction and self-soothing are generally less expensive than other types of medical treatment and therapy (Yoga can be done for free if you know what you’re doing, and classes are no more expensive than group psychotherapy prices), and they are generally considered to be safe, without side effects, and more empowering when compared to medication alternatives. More theoretically, leading therapists have discovered in the last decade that combining a self-soothing, relaxation-inducing group of techniques with action oriented (cognitive behavioral) therapy frequently produces better results for difficult-to-treat patient populations than action-oriented therapies alone. To provide two examples, Linehan’s Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (which is primarily directed at patients with Borderline Personality Disorder) and Hayes’ Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (which is focused at patients with depression). These newer therapeutic approaches make good use of yoga techniques that promote relaxation, self-soothing, and body awareness skills. These techniques may be particularly useful in enlisting the participation of impulsive and chaotically driven patients in the structured tools and techniques of cognitive therapy that may be beneficial to their progress. Practicing yoga provides a structured social environment. With all due respect to the caricatures of yogic mystics sitting cross-legged in glorious seclusion on a mountain top, the majority of Yoga in the west (and I assume the majority of Yoga in the east) is done in classroom settings. A big social opportunity arises as a result of the regular practice of Yoga, which is as important as anything else. There is no guarantee that you will get to know everyone or that you will do so quickly, but if you commit yourself to the practice of Yoga, you will quickly discover that you recognize faces in the class and that you will, sooner rather than later, end up making friends unless you take steps to prevent this from happening. The bonds of our infancy were forged in just this type of group crucible
  • Nevertheless, only this one is open to adults today. But, even if it isn’t required, I’ll say it anyway (smile! )
  • Involvement in social activities can help to alleviate the symptoms of depressed withdrawal.

Not Suitable for Everyone Yoga, as it is performed in the Western world, is essentially a type of exercise. As psychologist Kate Hayswill explains, many of the benefits of yoga that are associated with improved mental health may be obtained through other types of physical activity. This is crucial to remember since not every personality will mesh well with the practice of yoga. I believe that yoga is most beneficial for those who are nervous or sad or frantic or impulsive or obsessional and who are searching for stress reduction, self-soothing, and a peaceful approach to get in some mild exercise are the ideal candidates for yoga.

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If you’re thinking about taking a yoga class, here’s what you should know.

  1. Consult with your physician before attending. Because Yoga is a kind of exercise, it is recommended that anybody considering enrolling in a Yoga course consult with their physician beforehand to ensure that they are physically well enough to engage in such a program safely. Those who have a pre-existing medical condition should be very cautious about using this product. Selecting the Proper Type of Yoga Class The number of various types of Yoga available today is almost as many as the number of people who teach them. Some Yoga forms are more safe and gentle than others, while some are more challenging. I’ve had extremely positive encounters with both Iyengar style and Kripalu style Yoga teachers in my own personal practice. Because Astanga “Power” Yoga, any yoga that takes place in a “hot” room, and especiallyBikram Yoga, are extremely physically demanding, caution should be exercised when practicing them. Classes are listed in databases that may be found on the Internet in a variety of places, such as this one provided by Yoga Journal. Look for a yoga instructor who has been teaching for a long and who has been certified by a nationally or internationally renowned Yoga institution if you want the greatest results (like theKripalu Centerin Lenox, MA or theIyengar Foundation). Make it clear to the instructor that you are interested in ‘gentle beginning hatha Yoga’
  2. Be Cautious! Yoga, like any other physical activity, may be harmful if it is not performed properly. The risk of physical injury is increased if you follow poor instruction (for example, if your instructor forces you to perform something improperly) or if you push yourself too hard (which is more prevalent). During good Yoga practice, you should push yourself a little bit (in order to see development), but never so hard that you injure yourself or suffer severe discomfort. If what you’re doing is hurting you, stop what you’re doing.

Anecdote to Bring the Discussion to a Close One of the aspects of my own Yoga practice that I like the most is how it has assisted me in developing patience. When I initially started courses in the Spring of 1997, I couldn’t even reach my toes with my fingers. This infuriated me since so many others in my immediate vicinity were able to do so. At the time, I had a smart teacher named Stella, and I recall her observing how hard I was trying to get to the floor when I was in first grade. Yoga was something she talked about with me one night, telling me that it was more about experiencing where you are right now than about being somewhere you should be.

Sure enough, it was confirmed a few weeks later.

16 Science-Based Benefits of Yoga

While modern media and advertising may lead us to believe that yoga is solely about physical postures, the practice of yoga encompasses a wide range of contemplative and self-disciplinary practices, including meditation, chanting, mantra, prayer, breath work, ritual, and even selfless action, among other things. The term “yoga” derives from the root word “yuj,” which literally translates as “to yoke” or “to bind” in English. The term itself has a variety of connotations, ranging from an astronomical conjunction to nuptials, with the underlying notion of connectedness running through them all.

  1. In spite of the fact that the scientific study on yoga’s health benefits is still in its early stages, much of the data to date supports what practitioners have evidently understood for millennia: yoga is extremely good to our general health and well-being.
  2. Yoga Journal and Yoga Alliance, two of the world’s largest yoga organizations, performed a worldwide study in 2016, looking at a range of facts regarding yoga in an attempt to quantify its worth in the face of growing popularity.
  3. Physical health necessitates the ability to move with ease and flexibility.
  4. Flexible training has been demonstrated to be effective even with the lowest intensity types ( 2 , 3 ).
  5. Age-related decreased flexibility is a natural part of life, and a 2019 study indicated that yoga both slowed down the loss of flexibility in older persons and enhanced flexibility in these individuals ( 4 ).
  6. As a result, it’s not surprising that stress relief was the second most often reported reason for practicing yoga.
  7. But keep in mind that the physical practice of yoga is only one component of the overall discipline.
  8. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is considered to be one of the most common mental health problems in the world, affecting around one in every 100 people.
  9. In studies, it has been demonstrated that both movement-based yoga treatments and breathing-based practices may dramatically reduce depression symptoms ( 9 ).
  10. Inflammation for an extended period of time is associated with numerous diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and many more ( 10 ).

One analysis evaluated 15 research papers and discovered a similar finding: yoga, in all of its forms, intensities, and durations, lowered biochemical markers of inflammation across a wide range of chronic illnesses (11).

5. Yoga will likely increase your strength

However, while modern media and advertising may lead us to believe that yoga is solely about physical poses, the practice of yoga encompasses a wide range of contemplative and self-disciplinary practices such as meditation, chanting and mantra, prayer, breath work, ritual, and even acts of selflessness. YOGA derives from the root word “yuj,” which literally translates as “to yoke,” “to tie,” or “to bind oneself.” Its connotations range from an astrological conjunction to nuptials, with the underlying concept of connectedness running across them all.

  • Now, let’s take a closer look at 16 of the numerous advantages of yoga.
  • Increased flexibility was the most often mentioned reason for persons choosing to practice yoga (1).
  • The practice of yoga is diverse, with levels of intensity ranging from extremely intense to moderately intense and gentle.
  • In those 65 and older, yoga appears to be particularly beneficial for increasing flexibility.
  • According to a recent report by the American Psychological Association, 84 percent of American adults are experiencing the consequences of persistent stress (5).
  • Yoga, and particularly its asanas, have shown to be effective stress-relieving techniques, which is fortunate ( 6 ).
  • Exercises such as meditation, breath exercises, and auditory rituals such as chanting and sound baths have all been demonstrated to considerably reduce tension and stress ( 7 ).
  • A 2017 meta-analysis of 23 interventions that looked at the effects of yoga-based therapies on depressive symptoms came to the overwhelmingly positive conclusion that yoga may now be regarded an effective alternative treatment for MDD, according to the findings ( 8 ).
  • Chronic inflammation is frequently identified as a precursor to disease.

When a review of 15 research papers was conducted, they discovered a similar finding: yoga (of varied styles, intensities and durations) lowered biochemical markers of inflammation across a wide range of chronic illnesses (11).

6. Yoga may reduce anxiety

According to a recent report by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety disorders may be the most frequent mental health illnesses in the United States (15). Anxiety disorders include a variety of diverse conditions such as generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and particular phobias. Even long-term stress can be classified as an anxiety disorder in some circumstances. There have been a number of studies that show yoga asana may be useful as an alternative treatment for anxiety disorders, while some of the researchers have asked for more repeated studies before making a definitive statement to that effect ( 6 , 16 ).

7. Yoga may improve quality of life

“An individual’s view of their place in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live, as well as in connection to their objectives, expectations, standards, and worries” is how the World Health Organization defines quality of life (QOL) ( 18 ). Relationships, creativity, learning opportunities, health, and material pleasures are just a few of the variables that influence quality of life. For decades, researchers have regarded quality of life (QOL) as a significant predictor of people’s lifespan and the chance of patients’ improving when they are treated for a chronic disease or injury ( 19 ).

Stress can have a harmful impact on your immune system if it is ongoing ( 21 ).

Yoga, on the other hand, is regarded a scientifically validated alternative treatment for stress, as previously described.

Due in part to yoga’s capacity to combat inflammation and in part to the improvement of cell-mediated immunity, this has been seen to be the case ( 22 ).

9. Yoga can improve balance

Balance is vital in many situations, not only while trying to balance on one leg in Tree Pose in yoga class. It’s also required for ordinary everyday activities such as picking something up off the floor, reaching for something on a shelf, and descending a flight of stairs. Yoga has been demonstrated to improve athletes’ balance as well as their overall performance ( 3 ). Similarly, according to a review of research done on healthy populations, most people’s balance may improve as a result of frequently practicing yoga ( 23 ).

  1. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, falls among older persons in nursing homes are quite prevalent, and even the most minor of mishaps can result in an increased risk of mortality (24).
  2. More research with larger sample sizes, on the other hand, are required before a general conclusion can be reached.
  3. Adaptive yoga, often known as chair yoga, can be especially beneficial for older persons or those with injuries who are less mobile or have difficulty maintaining their balance.
  4. It is also known as “yogic breathing.” According to the Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine, a review of 1,400 papers was conducted to determine the overall effects of pranayama.

More specifically, the research presented in the review discovered that managing the tempo of breathing had a significant beneficial effect on the cardiovascular system, as demonstrated by favorable changes in heart rate, stroke capacity, arterial pressure, and contractility of the heart (28).

  • When studying sleep, experts examine a person’s capacity to fall asleep as well as his or her ability to remain asleep.
  • Yoga has been demonstrated to increase both the speed with which people fall asleep and the depth with which they remain asleep.
  • Numerous studies have found that yoga nidra is particularly beneficial for enhancing sleep, in addition to (or maybe because of) its ability to reduce anxiety ( 31 ,32).
  • The good news is that a number of recent studies have demonstrated that yoga can be effective in enhancing self-esteem and perceived body image in these individuals ( 33 , 34 ).
  • The length of the muscles holding the stance does not vary even if they are completely engaged in many yoga poses, which is known as isometric contractions in this context.
  • The lead leg in Warrior II is bent at both the hip and the knee, and you maintain this posture throughout the game.
  • Yoga asanas may also be effective in reversing bone loss linked with osteoporosis and osteopenia.

While this is the case, it’s also crucial to remember that the studies on yoga’s influence on bone density have been variable, and hence inconclusive, thus far (38).

An apparent pattern emerged, however, in a recent assessment of 34 research studies: yoga enhanced brain functioning in the areas of the brain responsible for interoception (recognizing the feelings in your body) and posture ( 39 ).

Practicing yoga positions during pauses in your workouts might also help you maintain a more upright posture.

According to the findings of the above-mentioned review, practicing yoga engaged regions of the brain responsible for motivation, executive functioning, attention, and neuroplasticity, among other things ( 39 ).

The findings of a recent study on burnout among hospice workers during the COVID-19 pandemic revealed that yoga-based meditation therapies helped greatly minimize the impacts of burnout by strengthening interoceptive awareness ( 41 ).

However, despite the fact that the research is still young (especially when compared to how long people have been practicing yoga), the results are encouraging and confirm what yoga practitioners and students have been saying for thousands of years: yoga is beneficial to our overall health and well-being.

Even karmic or humanitarian deeds can be considered yoga practices!

Yoga is a practice that may be done on a daily basis since it is not restricted to physical action. Decide on the yoga style that is most effective for you, and remember that investing in your yoga practice is an investment in yourself!

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