Why Yogis Need to Vote in the Fall 2016 Election

Why Yogis Need to Vote This Fall

Subscribe to Outside+ now to get unique access to all of our content, including sequences, instructor tips, video lessons, and much more. Is it possible for yogis to make a difference in this year’s elections? Members of the 50 million-strong well-being community can become a powerful constituency when they band together, according to Kerri Kelly, founder and president of the well-being activist groupCTZNWELL, which recently launched thevoteWELL platform to mobilize yogis and other adherents of a healthy lifestyle to vote in the upcoming midterm elections.

YJ: What was it that spurred you to start CTZNWELL?

The 2012 election provided us with an opportunity to organize this massive community of well-being, which included yogis, people who identify with spiritual practices, people who are passionate about healthy eating, how we are growing our food, taking care of farmers, and protecting the environment, among other things.

We can extend our practice to include the way we care for one another as well as the way we cast our votes.

  • When and why is this particular moment and election more precarious than others?
  • Who we elect — whether on a local or national level — will have an impact on our future course, determining whether we move toward or away from well-being in the long run.
  • Nobody, regardless of their political affiliation (left or right), conservatism or progressivism, Democratic or Republican, can deny that we are very far apart in this country, and that we are perhaps not entirely aligned around the well-being of our country.
  • YJ: So, what exactly is the well-being movement, and why is it important?
  • They spend money on their own well-being, which is a $300 billion industry in and of itself.
  • These individuals are not only aligned in their values, but they are also acting and investing in accordance with those values.
  • Our campaign is not about any particular candidates or political parties.

It is all about how we organize around our values and how we show up for the issues we care about.

This fall, how can the well-being movement make a difference, according to you?

in reality, it is a culture that encompasses many different communities.

Organizing people who have access to well-being in order for them to be advocates for everyone is our goal.

We are bridging different communities in order to promote greater inclusivity, or we are perpetuating the very exclusivity that we are attempting to combat.

Health and well-being in this country come at a high cost, and they come at a hefty premium.

We believe that being healthy should be a human right, not a privilege.

To achieve this, we want the 50 million people who are passionate about their well-being to band together and advocate on their behalf.

YJ: Can you tell me how yogis are particularly influential in this election?

Each time we step onto the yoga mat, we are affirming that we are not separate.

Political participation is a logical extension of our professional practice.

YJ:Do you have a preference for any particular candidates?

The importance of not telling people what to do is important to us; instead, we want to provide them with tools to consider what matters most to them, to find their voice, and to vote based on that.

We will not endorse a candidate, but we will encourage a provocative discussion about who is on the ticket and how they reflect on the issues that matter to them.

In our opinion, voting represents collective care; it is the means by which we take care of one another.

YJ: Kelly: We are encouraging everyone to Pledge to Vote as a demonstration of our collective power and intention to show up in November.

This includes classroom toolkits for yoga teachers, small circle curriculums around issues, debate watching, and voting. And, finally, we want to encourage everyone to speak up and out about what matters in this election. Join the conversation.

Voting on Election Day

Voter guides and sample ballots will provide information on the candidates as well as any state or local propositions that will be on the ballot. Examining them in advance of Election Day might assist you in deciding who to vote for.

Voter Guides

Voter guides give background information on the candidates and ballot initiatives that are on the election ballot. They’ll provide a list of the candidates for each post, as well as information on their qualifications and aspirations. In addition, they will clarify any ballot initiatives, which are particular topics or issues that you may either accept or reject on the ballot. Regional newspapers and issue-specific groups frequently publish voter guides, as do other media outlets.

  • BallotReady.org provides voter guides based on a person’s home address throughout the United States. Online voting allows you to store your choices and then print or email your customised ballot for use while voting in person at the polls.

Sample Ballots

Examples of sample ballots are just a representation of the elections and candidates, as well as any ballot initiatives, that will appear on your actual ballot. They will not give information on the candidates in the same way as voter guides do. Your state may send you a sample ballot, or you may be able to download one from the state’s election website. It is possible that the sample ballot will be identical to the final ballot. Unofficial sample ballots are produced by a number of non-profit groups.

Bringing Notes and Voter’s Guides to Your Polling Place

To the voting booth, you can bring your notes, a voter’s guide, or a sample ballot with you. This relieves you of the burden of memorizing your selections for candidates and ballot measures. Some polling sites prohibit the use of cell phones, so bring paper copies instead of using your phone to cast your ballot. Before you head to the polls, be sure you are aware of the rules in your area. The most recent update was made on October 4, 2021.

Presidential Election Process

Following the primaries and caucuses, the national conventions of major political parties are held.

What Happens at a National Political Convention?

Conventions are when a political party’s presidential and vice presidential nominees are chosen and confirmed. In order to be selected as the presidential nominee, a candidate must normally gain the support of a majority of delegates. This is normally accomplished through the party’s primary and caucus elections. It is then reaffirmed by a vote of the delegates present at the national convention in the following year. However, if no candidate wins the support of a majority of a party’s delegates during the primaries and caucuses, the nominee is chosen by the convention delegates.

Types of Delegates at a National Convention

Delegates can be divided into two categories:

  • Delegates who have pledged or been bound must support the candidate to whom they have been assigned through the primary or caucus process.
  • Unpledged delegates and superdelegates have the ability to support any presidential candidate of their choosing
  • Nevertheless,

Contested and Brokered Conventions

Only in exceptional circumstances does neither of the party’s candidates have a majority of delegates heading into the convention. The convention is seen as “controversial” by some. Delegates will next select their presidential contender through one or more rounds of voting, depending on their party affiliation.

  • When it comes to the first round of voting, pledged delegates are almost always required to vote for the candidate to whom they were assigned at the outset of the convention. Unpledged delegates, on the other hand, do not
  • Superdelegates are unable to vote in the first round unless a contender has already garnered enough delegates through primaries and caucuses to secure the candidacy
  • Otherwise, superdelegates cannot vote. It is deemed “brokered” if no candidate wins in the first round of voting at the convention. Later rounds of voting will allow the committed delegates to select any candidate they like. Later rounds of voting are open to superdelegates
  • Voting continues until one contender achieves the needed majority of votes to be named as the Democratic nominee.

At the convention, the presidential nominee formally declares their choice for vice president running mate, if they have not already done so.

The most recent update was made on January 31, 2022.

Top voting issues in 2016 election

p>The economy and terrorism are the two most important topics for voters this election season. Overall, 84 percent of registered voters say that the economy will be very important to them in deciding who to vote for in the 2016 presidential election; slightly fewer (80 percent) say that the issue of terrorism will be very important to them in deciding who to vote for in the 2016 presidential election. In 2008, substantially more people stated the economy would be very important to their vote (87 percent) than said the subject of terrorism would be very important to their vote (68 percent ).

  1. With a vacancy on the Supreme Court, 65 percent of voters think that nominations to the nation’s top court will be a very significant factor in their choice this fall, according to a new poll.
  2. Abortion (45 percent) and the treatment of gay, lesbian, and transgender individuals (40 percent) are viewed as extremely significant issues by fewer than half of voters, respectively.
  3. Other problems that Trump supporters consider to be of great importance include immigration (which received 79 percent support) and foreign policy (79 percent ).
  4. In addition, the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities is a major concern for Clinton supporters: 79 percent of Clinton supporters say this is extremely important to their vote, compared to only 42 percent of Trump supporters who say the same.
  5. The topic of gun legislation will be extremely important to both Clinton (74 percent) and Trump (71 percent) supporters, according to similar percentages of supporters.
  6. While the environment rates relatively low among all voters as a 2016 concern, Clinton supporters are far more likely than Trump supporters to say it is extremely important to their vote (69 percent) in the presidential election (32 percent ).
  7. There are a variety of viewpoints on the relevance of topics in voting decisions that differ across age categories.

According to the poll, about three-quarters of those aged 50-64 and 65 and above (74 percent each) believe judicial appointments will be extremely significant, compared to 60 percent of those aged 30-49 and just 45 percent of those aged under 30.

Terrorism is a very significant concern to those aged 65 and over (86 percent) and those aged 50 to 64 (85 percent), with slightly smaller majorities among those aged 30-49 (77 percent) and those aged 18-29 (68 percent) saying the same.

According to the poll, about three-quarters of those under 30 (74 percent) believe the treatment of minorities is a very significant issue in their vote, compared to 56 percent of those 65 and older.

In contrast to a number of other top topics, such as the economy, which have remained consistently high in popularity over the course of the previous several election cycles, immigration is an issue that has gained in significance.

Immigration has gained in significance among both Republicans and Democrats in recent years – however Republicans have continuously been somewhat more likely than Democrats to say it is a very significant issue in their voting decisions.

According to a poll conducted four years ago, 47 percent of Republicans and 37 percent of Democrats agreed.

Compared to other members of their respective parties, conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats are both more likely than their counterparts to say that the topics of Supreme Court selections and abortion are extremely important to their 2016 choice.

Additionally, among Democrats and Democratic leaners, liberals (69 percent) are more likely than moderates and conservatives (57 percent) to consider court nominations to be extremely essential to their 2016 vote.

Abortion will be very significant in their 2016 vote, according to around half of liberal Democrats (52 percent); 42 percent of conservative and moderate Democrats feel the same way.

Views of the candidates on the issues

When it comes to deciding which candidate would do a better job handling key issues, voters give Clinton the edge over Trump in a number of areas, including making wise foreign policy decisions and dealing with immigration. Clinton also has a slight advantage over Trump in several other areas, including dealing with the economy. In spite of the fact that Clinton is perceived to have a slight advantage over Trump on a greater number of issues included in the survey, Trump holds a narrow advantage over Clinton when it comes to improving economic conditions and defending the country against future terrorist attacks – two issues that voters rank near the top of their priority list.

Moreover, Clinton has a significant lead over Trump in terms of being the candidate who is more likely to reflect people’ views on abortion (53 percent vs.

More Americans believe Clinton would be better at making good foreign policy decisions than Trump, by a margin of nearly 20 points (54 percent -36 percent ).

With a seat on the Supreme Court currently available, 52 percent of voters believe Clinton would do a better job picking Supreme Court justices, compared to 40 percent who believe Trump would do a better job selecting Supreme Court justices.

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Furthermore, neither contender has a major advantage on gun legislation, a topic that has garnered fresh attention in the aftermath of the nightclub tragedy in Orlando, FL: The strategy taken by Clinton on firearms is preferred by 46 percent of Americans, while Trump’s approach is preferred by 45 percent.

  1. On terrorism, Trump enjoys a similar advantage: 48 percent of voters believe he would do a better job avoiding future attacks, compared to 43 percent who believe Clinton would do a better job preventing future attacks.
  2. In part, Trump’s overall performance on specific subjects reflects some concern among Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters – particularly those who favored another candidate in the Republican primaries – over his competence.
  3. Republicans who said they backed a candidate other than Donald Trump in the Republican primaries believe that Clinton (51 percent) would do a better job on racial relations than Trump (34 percent).
  4. When it comes to decreasing the power of lobbyists and special interest organizations in Washington, Clinton has the lowest level of confidence among Democrats.

Approximately four-in-ten Democrats who supported Clinton in the Democratic primary are not convinced that she would be the best candidate to reduce the influence of lobbyists and special interests: 57 percent believe she would do a better job on this issue than Trump, 22 percent believe Trump would do a better job, and 16 percent say neither would.

When it comes to which candidate would do a better job protecting the country from future terrorist attacks and improving economic circumstances, the differences between Democrats who supported Clinton in the primary and those who supported Sanders are even greater.

The same is true among Democrats who supported Clinton in the primaries: nearly nine in ten (87 percent) believe she would do a better job safeguarding the country from future terrorist attacks; 60 percent believe Sanders would do a better job doing so.

Early In-Person Voting

AlaskaAS §15.20.064, 15.20.045 and 6 AAC 25.500 Fifteen days before election Day of election Elections supervisors’ officesOther locations as designated by election director Varies by location
ArizonaARS §16-541, 16-542 Twenty-six days before election Friday before election Recorder’s officeAny other locations in the county the recorder deems necessary Not specified
ArkansasAR Code §7-5-418 Fifteen days before election 5 p.m. Monday before election Offices of county clerkOther locations as determined by county board of election commissioners Not specified
DelawareDel. Code Title 15, Chapter 54 At least 10 days before an election Sunday before election Designated by state election commissionerAt least one per county and one additional in the City of Wilmington At least eight hours per day. Polling sites must open at 7 a.m. on at least five days of early voting. Closing time is 7 p.m.Includes the Saturday and Sunday before the election
District of ColumbiaDC ST § 1-1001.09 Seven days before election, but in-person absentee voting is available 15 days before Saturday before election for early voting, day before election for in-person absentee Council ChambersOne satellite location in each ward 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m.Sunday excluded
FloridaFla. Stat. §101.657 Ten days before electionMay be offered 11 to 15 days before an election that contains state and federal races, at the discretion of the elections supervisor Three days before electionMay end two days before an election that contains state and federal races, at the discretion of the elections supervisor Main or branch offices ofelections supervisorsOther sites designated by the elections supervisor (locations must provide all voters in that area with equal opportunity to vote) No less than eight or more than 12 hours per dayElection supervisors may choose to provide additional days of early voting, including weekends
GeorgiaGA Code §21-2-380 and §21-2-382 Fourth Monday prior to a primary or election; as soon as possible prior to a runoff Friday immediately prior to a primary, election or runoff Board of registrars’ officesOther sites as designated by boards of registrars (must be a government building generally accessible to the public) Normal business hours on weekdays9 a.m.-4 p.m. on the second Saturday prior to primary or electionElection officials may provide for early voting beyond regular business hours
IdahoID Code §34-1006 and 34-1002 Third Monday before election (in-person absentee) 5 p.m., Friday before election Determined by county clerk Not specified
Illinois10 ILCS 5/19A-15 and 10 ILCS 5/19A-20 Fortieth day before election for temporary polling locations and 15th day before election for permanent locations End of the day before election day An election authority may establish permanent and temporary polling places for early voting at locations throughout the election authority’s jurisdiction, including but not limited to:Municipal clerk’s officeTownship clerk’s officeRoad district clerk’s officeCounty or local public agency officeEarly voting locations must be provided at public universities Permanent early voting locations must remain open from the 15tth day before an election during the hours of8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. or 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on weekdays.Beginning eight days before an election, they must remain open 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. or 9 a.m. -7 p.m. on weekdays,9 a.m.-Noon on Saturdays and holidays, and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sundays.Permanent early voting locations must stay open at least eight hours on any holiday and a total of at least 14 hours on the final weekend during the early voting period.Election authorities may decide the days and hours for temporary early voting locations, beginning the fortieth day before an election.
IndianaInd. Code §3-11-4-1 and 3-11-10-26 Twenty-eight days before election (in-person absentee) Noon, day before election Office of circuit court clerkCounty election board may adopt a resolution to authorize the circuit court clerk to establish satellite offices for early voting The office of the circuit court clerk must permit in-person absentee voting for at least seven hours on each of the two Saturdays preceding election day, but a county with fewer than 20,000 voters may reduce this to a minimum of four hours on each of the two Saturdays preceding election day
IowaIA Code §53.10 and 53.11(b) Twenty days before election (in-person absentee) 5 p.m., day before election Commissioners’ officesSatellite locations may be established by commissionerSatellite location must be established upon receipt of a petition signed by at least 100 eligible electors requesting a specific location A satellite station established by petition must be open at least one day for a minimum of six hours
KansasKSA §25-1119, 25-1122a, 25-1123 Twenty days before election or Tuesday before election (varies by county) Noon, day before election Offices of county election officersCounty election officers may designate satellite locations Not specified
KentuckyKRS 117.085 Thursday before election. Saturday before election. Offices of county clerks or any other locations designated by the county board of elections. Not specified.
LouisianaLRS 18:1303 and 1309 Fourteen days before election Seven days before election Registrars’ officesRegistrar may provide alternate location in the courthouse or a public building in the immediate vicinity thereofOne branch office of the registrar, as long as it is in a public building 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday through SaturdayHolidays excluded
MaineTitle 21-A §753B(2) and 753-B(8) In-person absentee voting available as soon as absentee ballots are ready (30-45 days before election) Three business days before election, unless the voter has an acceptable excuse. Municipal clerks’ offices During regular business hours on days when clerks’ offices are open
MarylandElection Law §10-301.1 Monday, Oct. 26 (2020 only) Monday, Nov. 2 (2020 only) Established by State Board of Elections in collaboration with local boardsNumber required depends on county population and ranges from one to five per county 7 a.m.-8 p.m. (2020 general election)10 a.m.-8 p.m. each day in all other elections
MichiganConstitution Article II, Section 4 (as amended by Ballot Proposal 3 in 2018) In-person absentee voting during the 40 days before an election Day before election At least one location During regular business hours and for at least eight hours during the Saturday and/or Sunday immediately prior to the election.Local election officials have the authority to make in-person absentee voting available for additional times and places beyond what is required.
MassachusettsM.G.L.A. 54 §25B(only available for state biennial elections) Eleven days before election Second business day before election (Friday before) City hall election office and town clerk’s officeAlternate or additional locations may be provided at the discrection of the city or town registrar Regular business hours. City or town clerks may provide additional hours (including weekends) at their discretion.
MinnesotaM.S.A. §203B.081,203B.085 Forty-six days before election (in-person absentee) 5 p.m. the day before election Elections offices or any other location designated by county auditor Monday through Friday regular business hours.10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday before election; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on the day before Election Day.
MontanaM.C.A. §13-13-205 Thirty days before election (in-person absentee) Day before election Elections offices Not specified
NebraskaN.R.S. §32-808,§32-938, 32-942 Thirty days before each election. Election Day County clerk or election commissioners’ offices Not specified
New JerseyN.J.S.A.§19:63-6 Ten days before the election, but in-person absentee voting begins forty-five days before election. Sunday before election Each county board of elections shall designate at least three, but not more than five, public locations within each county, except that the county board shall designate at least five, but not more than seven public locations for early voting if the number of registered voters in the county is at least 150,000 but less than 300,000, and shall designate at least seven, but not more than 10 public locations for early voting if the number of registered voters in the county is 300,000 or more. Not specified
New MexicoN.M.S.A. §1-6-5(G) Third Saturday before election Saturday before election Clerks’ offices and:Class A counties with more than 200,000 registered voters: clerk must establish at least 12 alternate locationsClass A counties with 200,000 or fewer registered voters: clerk must establish at least 4 alternate locationsNon-class A counties with more than 10,000 registered voters: clerk must establish at least one alternate locationNon-class A counties with 10,000 or fewer registered voters: clerk’s office and alternate locations as designated by clerk Hours are set by the clerk, and must begin no earlier than 7 a.m. and end no later than 9 p.m.Each alternate location must be open for at least eight consecutive hours on each day of early voting, and may be closed on Sundays and Mondays
New YorkElection Law Title VI, §8-600 Tenth day before election Second day before an election At least one early voting location for every full increment of 50,000 registered voters in each county, but not more than seven are required. Counties with fewer than 50,000 registered voters shall have at least one early voting location. Counties and the city of New York may choose to establish more than the minimum required. Early voting sites shall be located so that voters have adequate and equitable access. Open for at least eight hours between 7 a.m.-8 p.m. each weekday during the early voting period.At least one early voting site shall be open until 8 p.m. on at least two weekdays in each calendar week during the early voting period.Open for at least five hours between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. on each Saturday, Sunday and legal holiday during the early voting period.Boards of elections may establish a greater number of hours for voting during the early voting period beyond what is required.
North CarolinaN.C.G.S.A. §163-227.2 Third Thursday before election 3 p.m. on the last Saturday before election Office of county board of electionsThe county board of elections may choose to offer additional locations, subject to approval by the state board of elections. All sites must be open during the same days and hours. Monday through Friday during regular business hours at the county board of elections. A county board may conduct early voting on weekends.If the county board of elections opens early voting sites on Saturdays or Sundays during the early voting period, then all sites shall be open for the same number of hours uniformly throughout the county on those days.There are exceptions for counties with islands that contain no bridges to the mainland.
North DakotaNDCC §16.1-07-15 Fifteen days before election Day before election At the discretion of county auditor The county auditor chooses and publishes the hours.
OhioNote: Uniform statewide schedule is set by the secretary of state:2 020 voting schedulehere Twenty-eight days before election (in-person absentee) 2 p.m. Monday before election Main office of board of electionsBoard may conduct voting at a branch office only under certain conditions 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, with some extended evening hours in the week prior to the election8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday1-5 p.m. on the Sunday before Election Day
Oklahoma§26-14-115.4 Wednesday preceding an election (in-person absentee) 2 p.m. on the Saturday before election At a location designated by the county election board. For counties of more than 25,000 registered voters or with an area of more than 1,500 square miles, more than one location may be designated 8 a.m.-6 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday9 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday
Pennsylvania25 P.S. § 3146.2a Fifty days before election (in-person absentee) 5 p.m. first Tuesday prior to day of election Local board of elections During regular business hours
Rhode Island§17-20-2.2 Twenty days before election (in-person absentee) Day before election At local boards of canvassers During regular business hours
South DakotaS.D.C.L. §12-19-2.1 Forty-five days before election (in-person absentee) 5 p.m. the day before the election Office of the person in charge of elections Regular office hours
TennesseeTenn. Code §2-6-102(a)(1) Twenty days before election Five days before election (seven days for a presidential preference primary) County election commission office or other location(s) designated by the county election commission. Offices must be open a minimum of three consecutive hours on weekdays and Saturdays between 8 a.m.-6 p.m. during the early voting period.On at least three days, offices must be open between 4:30-7 p.m., and on at least one Saturday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. in counties with a population of over 150,000.
TexasTex. Elec. Code §85.001and 85.002 Seventeen days before election Four days prior to election In a room in the offices of the county clerk, or elsewhere as determined by the clerkEach county has one main early voting center During business hours on weekdays unless:Fewer than 1,000 voters, in which case three hours per day, or more than 100,000 voters, in which case 12 hours per day during the last week
VirginiaVA Code Ann. § 24.2-701.1 Forty-five days before election 5 p.m. Saturday before election Office of the general registrar. Additional locations in public buildings may be provided at local discretion. Regular business hours.A minimum of eight hours between 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on the two Saturdays before the election. The electoral board or general registrar may provide early voting on the two Sundays before the election, as well.
West VirginiaW.V. Code §3-3-3And SB 581 Thirteen days before election Three days before election Courthouse or the annex next to the courthouseCounty commission may designate additional areas, subject to requirements prescribed by the Secretary of State Must be open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturdays through EV period
WisconsinWis. Code §6.86(1)(b) Fourteen days preceding the election (in-person absentee) Sunday preceding the election Clerks’ offices A municipality shall specify the hours.
WyomingWyo. Stat. §22-9-105 and 125 Forty days before election (in-person absentee) Day before election County clerks’ officesCourthouse or other public building Must be open regular hours on normal business days
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Aakar Patel

It has been a long time since I have visited Uttar Pradesh, and what I am saying is not based on any fresh material or on any groundwork that I have completed recently. However, it is fascinating to look at the voting trends in the state over the previous several years in order to determine what the possibilities are in that state’s next election in the coming months. With a vote percentage of 29 percent in 2012, the Samajwadi Party was able to secure an absolute majority in the state of Uttar Pradesh.

  • The BJP, which was then led by Uma Bharti, received barely 15 percent of the vote at the time.
  • The BJP garnered almost 40% of the vote on its own.
  • The second incident occurred in western Uttar Pradesh, when there was communal rioting.
  • In spite of the fact that the violence continued for a long time, BJP campaigns in both 2014 Lok Sabha and 2017 Assembly elections took advantage of it to mobilize their supporters.
  • An “audio recording of Amit Shah’s meeting with the leaders of the Jat community, which was strategically leaked, had a significant impact on the community,” according to the report.
  • In fact, it frightened the community and convinced at least half of the Jats to support it by the time the Jat-dominated territories went to the polls on February 11, according to reports.
  • Other than the economy, which was expected to play a role in this election, there was nothing else to consider.

However, this did not appear to have a significant impact on the BJP, which maintained its position as the dominant party.

In this election, the Bahujan Samaj Party saw its vote share decline.

This did not occur, as the BJP boosted its vote share to over 50 percent, sweeping the state once more.

The strike on Balakot took place at the end of February, and the vote took place a few weeks later.

Given how much emphasis the BJP placed on communal divisiveness in 2017, we can presume that this is the key engine of its politics and the constituency that it seeks to win over in 2018.

Pakistan is precious to them, and we are willing to lay down our lives for Maa Bharati.” Earlier in the day, Rajnath Singh, the Indian defense minister, had stated, “I do not understand why Pakistan’s founder Jinnah’s name is frequently used during election campaigns.” Those who wish to turn this into a political issue.

  1. Instead, we should speak of sugarcane grown by farmers.” For the BJP, raising the issues of Jinnah, Pakistan, and Muslims is justified by the fact that it has previously worked for them.
  2. According to the general tendencies, the BJP will need to maintain its vote percentage from the last three elections in order to sweep Uttar Pradesh.
  3. The Samajwadi Party looks to be on its way to achieving a new high in terms of vote share, but it is uncertain if even this would be enough to prevent the BJP from winning a second term.
  4. The final step in this process is to determine whether or not there are any external influences at play.
  5. Furthermore, the present agitation against the Union government over the problem of jobs in the Railways and other departments of the Central government is a source of contention.

Will all of this be rendered moot in the face of growing communal polarisation? It seems likely that the outcome of this election will provide us with an answer to this issue.

If You are a Yogi, Should You Vote?

As we prepare for the forthcoming elections, we wanted to offer Swami Satchidananda’s thoughts on yoga and political participation. Even from the first days of his arrival in America, he pushed his students to be responsible citizens and to use their right to vote. Among the questions he received from new students was, “How can Yoga practice be related to political actions?” “You know, in the name of spirituality, we don’t have to disregard the world or run away from the world,” he responded.

  • “Such a person can deal with everything and everything in the world more effectively.” Concerning Social Change In 1977, he was asked about his thoughts on bringing about societal change.
  • Because a yogi is someone who is able to view things clearly while maintaining a neutral mind.
  • He would not just cast a vote based on his political affiliation (Democrat or Republican).
  • Who is the perpetrator?
  • It is the individual who creates the party, rather than the individual creating the party.
  • “Can Integral Yoga assist me in making a decision?” “Well, I think you’ve figured it out,” he said.
  • Integral Yoga practice will bring you to a state of neutrality.

No, it is not because you are a member of one political party or another.

What they did, and what they didn’t do, were both important.

That is why we should vote.” The other one has a 40 percent poor and a 60 percent positive split, or something similar.

By refusing to vote, you are encouraging the undesired person to attend.

Just select the lesser of two evils.

Peace is within our grasp, according to Swami Satchidananda’s book: “We refer to our nation as a democracy, but it is not a true democracy unless and until our elected officials represent the whole population. We must thoroughly analyze our options and vote for the most qualified candidate.”

Uttar Pradesh Assembly polls

The Bhartiya Janata Party’s ability to effectively administer COVID-19 is emerging as a key feature in the party’s electoral appeal in the upcoming Uttar Pradesh Assembly elections, something that the opposition has not been able to successfully rebut aggressively. As part of his preparations for the upcoming Assembly elections, Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath has been visiting COVID-designated hospitals in several districts of western Uttar Pradesh, which will vote in both the first and second phases of the polls.

During political rallies in Bulandshahr and Hapur on Sunday, he stated that, just as the BJP government in the state was able to contain the riots, it would be able to wipe out the coronavirus as well if it worked together.

SP chief’s statement

One of Akhilesh Yadav’s most infamous statements, in which he referred to the COVID vaccination as the “BJP vaccine,” has continued to plague him. Mr. Adityanath stated in Hapur that if the vaccination was provided by the BJP, then more than 90 percent of the state’s people had received it for free and that they would now vote for the party. In accordance with official numbers, more than 70% of the eligible population in the state had got both doses of the immunizations. During a meeting with Mr.

Official documentation state that 23,164 individuals have died as a result of COVID-19, however these statistics are invariably preceded by an asterisk, indicating that the exact death toll will be revealed when a death audit is completed.

Observers believe that increasing the pitch for free immunization and free rations during the second wave was part of the BJP’s election plan to make people forget about the alleged mishandling during the first wave.

The party itself suffered a significant loss of MLAs and employees as a result of the failure to provide prompt treatment.

After losing Chetan Chauhan, MLA from Naugawan Saadat in Amroha in the first wave, and Vijay Kashyap, MLA from Charthwal in Muzaffarnagar in the second wave, the BJP lost ministers Chetan Chauhan and Vijay Kashyap to COVID-19 in western Uttar Pradesh.

Honorarium, incentives

As a result of an increase in their honorarium and incentives in December, he said, the government had been able to halt the mounting discontent among Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHA) and auxiliary nurses, who serve as community leaders and influencers. Rashtriya Lok Dal spokesperson Sandeep Chaudhary stated that when the polls were declared, Mr. Adityanath should refrain from using his constitutional position for electoral benefit, and that his party will bring the problem to the attention of suitable audiences.

  • Chaudhary stated.
  • Those who are financially better situated in villages, regardless of political affiliation, may readily be heard complaining about how the poor had gotten so much that they had to sell some of it.
  • A number of incidents have recently emerged from Prayagraj, Mau, and Aligarh in which persons have acquired vaccination certificates despite not having received the immunization shot.
  • “On April 28, 2021, my older sister died of COVID-19 in a Lucknow hospital during the second wave of the outbreak.

“Surprisingly, the allegation became an actuality for me the day before yesterday.” Mohammed Shameem, professor in the Department of Tuberculosis and Chest Diseases at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, said that while political leaders liked to take credit for the second wave of pandemic influenza, the fact was that it had a devastating effect all over the world, with India being no exception.

“With the third wave, we are more prepared, and the fact that Omicron is not causing serious disease makes things appear to be looking up.” According to Prof.

West UP ground report: Cracks appear in rainbow alliance vote base

Bhupesh Chaudhary, a citizen of the Mant assembly seat in the city of Mathura in the state of Uttar Pradesh, has a long list of concerns for the government that he wants answered. When it comes to the Jats, if the Bharatiya Janata Party is worried about them, why was (Haryana Chief Minister) Manohar Lal Khattar permitted to stay in office following the brutality against them during the 2016 protests?” Why aren’t the Jats included in the central OBC (other backward classes) list of ethnic groups?

Chaudhary is a member of the Jat group, which has a significant vote bank of around 16.5 percent in Mathura alone, and which is being courted by both the BJP and the opposition parties.

In 2016, the demand sparked unrest that erupted across Haryana, with repercussions felt as far away as Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.

Farmers staged a 14-month-long protest, which culminated with the government repealing them late last year.

The BJP has been working overtime to win over the community that supported the party in large numbers in the previous assembly elections as well as the last two general elections, but the community has been vocal about its dissatisfaction with the party in the wake of the farmer protests and has expressed its displeasure with the party publicly.

That is one of the reasons why top BJP officials, including party president JP Nadda and union home minister Amit Shah, have taken to the streets, canvassing support door-to-door in Jat-dominated districts (to be sure, this approach has been forced upon them by Election Commission restrictions on rallies on account of the pandemic, but even then, it is rare for senior leaders to go door-to-door).

  • In this area, the fluoride levels are over the allowable limits.
  • He is dissatisfied that, despite its lofty aspirations, the state administration has chosen to place greater emphasis on matters of identity than on issues that impact people’s everyday lives.
  • Residents have been vocal in their dissatisfaction with the quality of portable water, the availability of energy for farms, the scarcity of fertilizers, and the low monetary compensation for their harvest.
  • However, here in Mathura, the Jats are not buying into the anti-Muslim rhetoric, and as a result, despite the RLD’s affiliation with the Samajwadi Party, they will vote for the combination,” says Rajendra Ferrari, a lawyer and political analyst.
  • Some members of the Jat population in this city still hold the belief that the former ruling party sided with the Muslims during the partition.
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Mant residents who turned out to show support for the SP-RLD candidate Sanjay Lathar said that while the incumbent legislator, Shyam Sunder Sharma (now with the BSP), has a record of winning eight times from Mant, the residents want to vote for the alliance to register their protests against the BJP this time around.

  • Cracks are appearing in the rainbow coalition.
  • The party has formed agreements with OBC groups like as the Apna Dal and the Nishad Party, which represent Kurmis, Kushwahas, Nishads, and many other minorities collectively known as the non-dominant OBCs, as well as with other regional parties.
  • However, fractures are beginning to appear in this illustrious union.
  • It was Modi who granted us samman (respect) by establishing the Ministry of Fisheries, and it was Yogi who provided us with free ration.

After being pressed for further information on what the government might have done to prevent the lockdown, he replies, “I had a Ber (fruit) farm, and during the shutdown I lost approximately half of the harvest because stray cattle are everywhere.” However, we only see livestock damaging our fields despite the fact that the government promises to provide goshalas (cow barns).” In the mandi (local market), an agent who does not want his name published says that the Kushwaha community is divided, with some supporting the BJP while others are concerned that government perks like the free meal scheme would be discontinued after the elections.

His explanation for the slowdown and the free ration is that there is a corona (pandemic) and that there will be elections.

Even in Agra, where a sizable Dalit (scheduled caste) population has a significant impact on electoral outcomes, the face of Jatav (Dalit) leader Baby Rani Maurya (of the BJP) or a list of benefits that the community has received from state and central schemes have not been enough to prevent a division over voting preference among members of the community.

“The BJP has helped us because it has provided us with better working and living conditions.” A large number of Valmikis were registered as BJP supporters in the previous elections.

If we die, there will be nothing the government can do to assist our children in any way.

Despite the fact that the BSP is not considered a strong competitor in the elections that will take place on February 10, its followers admit that they would prefer to vote for members of their own caste rather than for the SP.

“Unemployment, starvation, and the breakdown of the health-care system during the Covid epidemic caused each family to suffer in their own manner,” says the author.

This time around, just the core voter has sided with the BJP; the floating voter has switched sides, and there is no hawa wala (voter who creates a wave) voter present.

However, they have no option because factories have shut down and there is no job for the daily wagers,” she adds.

It may also be difficult to convince Dalits to become a part of the concentrated Hindu vote, according to him. In the appointment of priests in temples or in the solemnization of inter-caste marriages, where is the Hindu pride?”

  • Residents of the Mant assembly constituency in Uttar Pradesh’s Mathura, Bhupesh Chaudhary, have a lengthy list of issues for the government, which he hopes will be addressed. When it comes to the Jats, if the Bharatiya Janata Party is worried about them, why was (Haryana Chief Minister) Manohar Lal Khattar permitted to stay in office following the brutality against them during the 2016 protests? When it comes to OBCs (other backward castes), why are Jats not included? ‘Why did 700 farmers perish before the government repealed the agricultural legislation?’ Chaudhary is a member of the Jat group, which has a significant vote bank of around 16.5 percent in Mathura alone, and which is being courted by both the BJP and the opposition. According to some Jats, the allusion to the chief minister of neighboring Haryana serves to remind them of the bitterness they feel towardthe BJP for not accepting their demand that their community be included on the central OBC list. Several incidents of violence erupted in Haryana in 2016, with repercussions felt across Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. When the federal government enacted three new farm rules in 2020, the outpouring of rage returned. Late this year, the government lifted the regulations following a 14-month farmer-led campaign. They are classified as Other Backward Castes (OBCs) in Uttar Pradesh and are eligible to receive quotas in education and employment. In an effort to win back support from a community that voted in large numbers for the BJP in the previous assembly elections and in both of the most recent general elections, the BJP has gone into overdrive to win back support from farmers who have expressed their displeasure with the party in response to the farmer protests. BJP politicians were met with black flags before the restrictions were removed, and the party is concerned that the wounds would stay long after the laws are repealed. In order to garner support in Jat-dominated districts, prominent BJP officials such as party President JP Nadda and Union Home Minister Amit Shah have taken to the road, visiting homes and businesses door-to-door (to be sure, this approach has been forced upon them by Election Commission restrictions on rallies on account of the pandemic, but even then, it is rare for senior leaders to go door-to-door). Shah even convened a meeting with a group of Jat leaders, which was interpreted as an olive branch, although the attitude in Mathura’s Jat-dominated regions is anything from friendly. Fluoride levels in the water here are higher than allowed.” Chaudhary, an agriculturist, asks, “Have you ever heard anyone talk about that?” In spite of its lofty aspirations, he is dissatisfied with the state government’s decision to maintain an emphasis on identity rather than concerns that impact people’s daily lives. Mathura is one of 60 districts in the state where the water contains excessive fluoride levels, according to statistics published by the Department of Drinking Water and Sanitation in 2019. (it leads to several problems including severe bone disease). A number of residents have expressed concern about the quality of portable water, the availability of energy for farms, the scarcity of fertilizers, and the little monetary compensation they receive for their harvest. “They have kept the rivalry between the Mandir and the Masjid alive.” The 2013 Muzaffarpur riots are brought up on a regular basis in order to prevent the Jats and Muslims from forgetting about the past. However, here in Mathura, the Jats are not buying into the anti-Muslim rhetoric, and as a result, despite the RLD’s partnership with the Samajwadi Party, they will vote for the combined party, according to lawyer Rajendra Ferrari. His allusion is to the riots that occurred under the previous Samajwadi Party government’s tenure, which served to drive a gap between the various ethnic groups. Some members of the Jat population here still believe that the former governing party sided with the Muslims during the partition of India. Earlier this year, the SP and the Rashtriya Lok Dal, now led by Jayant Choudhary, whose grandfather, former Prime Minister Charan Singh, was once the tallest Jat politician in the world, joined forces to fight the election. There is a rising mistrust of the BJP among members of the community, according to Ferrari. Mant residents who turned out to show support for the SP-RLD candidate Sanjay Lathar said that while the incumbent legislator, Shyam Sunder Sharma (now with the BSP), has a record of winning eight times from Mant, this time around the residents want to vote for the alliance in order to register their protests against the ruling party. In addition, there are no subsidies for electricity usage, and the prices of petrol, cooking gas, and cooking oil have risen. ” The administration doesn’t seem to be bothered.” Chaudhary is perplexed. A rift has appeared among the rainbow alliance. It is not only the Jats who the BJP looks to for support in order to increase its share of the votes. A coalition of OBC parties, including Apna Dal and Nishad Party, representing Kurmis, Kushwahas, and Nishads, as well as many other groups collectively known as the non-dominant OBCs, has been formed between the party and the OBC groups. Often, this varied group is referred to as a “rainbow coalition of castes,” which is a play on words. However, fractures are beginning to appear in this storied alliance. Worker from the Nishad community at the local granary in Firozabad are dissatisfied with the government’s policies and claim that their lives have not improved since the administration took office. It was Modi who granted us samman (respect) by establishing the Ministry of Fisheries, and it was Yogi who provided us with free rations. ” We will have to vote for the BJP since our Nishad Party is a member of the sarkar (government),” says Shiv Dutt, a farmer. After being pressed for further information on what the government might have done to prevent the lockdown, he replies, “I had a Ber (fruit) farm, and during the shutdown I lost over half of my harvest because stray cattle are everywhere.” However, we only see livestock damaging our fields despite the fact that the government claims to have goshalas (cow barns) in place. In the mandi (local market), an agent who does not want his name published says that the Kushwaha community is divided, with some supporting the BJP while others are concerned that government perks like the free meal program would be phased out after the election. His explanation for the slowness and the free ration is that there is a corona (pandemic) and that there are elections. In the case of a “kante ki takar” (tight race), Dutt and the Kushwaha agent agree that the BJP’s reputation as a “Hindu party” will give it the advantage over the other parties. Even in Agra, where a sizable Dalit (scheduled caste) population has a significant impact on electoral outcomes, the face of Jatav (Dalit) leader Baby Rani Maurya (of the BJP) or a list of benefits that the community has received from state and central schemes have not been enough to prevent a division over voting preferences among members of the community. BJP has benefited sanitation workers in Ramnagar, according to a sanitation worker in Ramnagar. “The Valmikis constitute 90 percent of the sanitation workforce at the Agra Municipal Corporation, and all you have to do is look at our working and living conditions to understand how the BJP has benefited us.” Before then, Valmikis were counted as supporters of the BJP in previous elections. “Even during the epidemic, we received nothing except shots
  • There were no gloves, no masks, and no insurance.” He does not want to be recognized further: ” If we die, there will be little the government can do to assist our children in their future. In 2005, their leaders came to our town and asked for votes, only to leave us in the dust within a few minutes. There are pockets of BJP support in Jatav strongholds such as Katra Wazir Khan, but overall the community appears to be in favour of the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP). The BSP is not considered a strong competitor in the elections that will take place on February 10 and its followers admit that they would prefer to vote for their own caste rather than for the ruling party SP. While the BJP claims that its policies such as subsidised housing and toilets that benefit marginalized communities regardless of their caste and political affiliations have made it an attractive option for communities such as the Jatavs, who were once considered to be the BSP’s foundation, the party has denied this claim. As a result of the Covid epidemic, each family suffered in their own manner, due to unemployment, starvation, and the collapse of the health-care system.” Individuals who live in rural regions have been particularly hard hit. There is no hawa wala voter (one who creates a wave) this time around
  • Only the core voter has sided with the BJP, and the floating voter has switched sides. According to RK Bharti, a professor at the BR Ambedkar University in Agra, “the BJP is offering free ration, but most people believe that accepting it is beneath their dignity. However, they have no option because companies have closed and there is no job for the daily wagers.” According to him, it may be difficult to entice Dalits to participate in the combined Hindu vote. In the appointment of priests in temples or in the solemnization of inter-caste marriages, where is the Hindu pride?” says one.

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